Chinese (Simplified)EnglishFrenchGermanHindiItalianPortugueseRussianSpanish

Articles By Category

Article's Tag Cloud

Recent Comments

    Wiki: Limburger Cheese Making Recipe

    This is a generic recipe for making Limburger. Limburger is famously stinky but a delicious tasting cheese.

    Ingredients – Metric

    Makes ~0.45 kg of Limburger Cheese:

    • 4 litres fresh whole cow’s milk.
    • Optional: Calcium Chloride if using store-bought pasteurized milk, amount as per manufacturers directions or your experience.
    • 60 ml of homemade or your choice of manufactured Mesophilic Starter Culture, amount as per directions.
    • Optional: Annatto Cheese Colourant, amount as per directions or your experience, diluted in ~50 ml water.
    • Brevibacterium linens.
    • Optional: Penicillium candidum or a piece of rind from a Camembert cheese as an inoculant. If spraying on P candidum, 16 hours before use, melt 0.6 ml salt and 0.6 ml sugar in 250 ml water then dilute in 0.6 ml P candidum, pour into atomizer, and place in fridge to reactivate before use.
    • Rennet, your choice of type, amount as per your experience or package directions, diluted in ~125 ml cool water.
    • Salt

    Ingredients – American

    Makes ~1 pound of Limburger Cheese:

    • 1 US gallon fresh whole cow’s milk.
    • Optional: Calcium Chloride if using store-bought pasteurized milk, amount as per manufacturers directions or your experience.
    • Brevibacterium linens.

    • 2 fluid ounces of homemade or your choice of manufactured Mesophilic Starter Culture, amount as per directions.
    • Cheese Colourant, amount as per directions or your experience, diluted in ~1/2 cup water.
    • Brevibacterium linens diluted in 1 quart water or per package directions.
    • Optional: Penicillium candidum or a piece of rind from a Camembert cheese as an inoculant. If spraying on P candidum, 16 hours before use, melt 1/8 tsp salt and 1/8 tsp sugar in 8 oz water then dilute in 1/8 tsp P candidum, pour into atomizer, and place in fridge to reactivate before use.
    • Rennet, your choice of type, amount as per your experience or package directions, diluted in ~4 ounces of cool water.
    • Salt

    Directions

    Making

    1. Pour milk into stockpot, warm to 30-33°C / 86-92°F.
    2. Optional, if adding Calcium Chloride, do so here and stir in.
    3. Add lactic starter culture and thoroughly stir in.
    4. Optional, if adding Brevibacterium linens directly to milk, do so here by stirring in.
    5. Optional, if adding Penicillium candidum directly to milk, do so here by stirring in.
    6. Optional, if adding diluted colourant, do so now and thoroughly stir in.
    7. Add diluted rennet, whisk in for 1 minute, cover and set aside for curd to set.
    8. After ~45-60 minutes, check for clean break, if not good, wait another ~15 minutes and check again. If good, cut curd into 1.25 cm/0.5 inch cubes.
    9. Stir gently for ~10 minutes.
    10. Increase temperature slowly to 33°C / 92°F over 15 minutes, then stir slowly for another 20 min at 33°C / 92°F until sufficiently firm.
    11. Let curds settle for 5 minutes then drain off whey.
    12. Optional, wash cut curds with weak brine to lower curd’s acidity.
    13. Place 2 small preferably square or rectangular cheese hoops (round Camembert hoops will work) on mats on draining board beside sink, then gently ladle cut curds into hoops.
    14. To create same height cheeses, ensure curd height is same in each hoop.
    15. Turn hoops while gravity draining until firm enough to retain shape. Note, a light weight board can be used as a light weight.
    16. Remove cheeses from hoops and cut to desired rectangular brick size.
    17. Salt the cheeses either by rolling in salt, or rubbing with salt, or by bathing in brine.
    18. Optional, if applying Brevibacterium linens here to surface, dilute in water and spray/mist onto all surfaces.
    19. Optional, if applying Penicillium candidum here to surface, dilute in water and spray/mist onto all surfaces.

    Aging

    1. Age the cheese at 10-15°C / 50-60°F and relative humidity of 90% for ~2-3 weeks. As the cheeses cure, slime forms on the surface and the rind acquires a reddish-yellow colour. For first 10 days, every other day turn cheeses and gently wash with light brine and brush to smear the bacteria. For second 10 days smear every 3-4 days. Note, in factories, the older Limburgers are rubbed or washed before the younger thereby inoculating the younger cheeses.
    2. After 2-3 weeks, wrap Limburgers in parchment or waxed paper, then in foil.
    3. Age for another 3+ weeks at 4-10°C / 40-50°F.

    Consuming

    1. Less than 1 month age the cheese is firm, crumbly, and salty with an acidic flavor similar to Feta Cheese.
    2. At 1.5 months age, the cheese is a “Beginner Limburger” or “affiné” (refined) and is firm with crumbly center and soft outer edge as the bacteria works from rind to inside and has an acidic flavor.
    3. At 1.5-2 months the cheese is “à point” and is soft almost to center, and has a slightly sweet and earthy flavor.
    4. At 2-3 months the cheese soft and spreadable, the salt has blended in, and the cheese is sweet strong flavor.
    5. At 3+ months the cheese is only for die-hard Limburger-lovers with an intense very strong and pungent almost bitter aroma/flavor.

    Tricks & Traps

    • If curds stick to mats, use thin blade knife to separate.
    • If using Penicillium candidum, there are some special safety concerns especially if using raw milk because the acidity decreases (pH increases) dramatically due to the white mould which can allow pathogens to survive and then grow when the pH increases during ripening. To mitigate this, curing rooms must be cleaned and sanitized regularly.

    Comments are closed.