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    Wiki: White Mould Defects, Blooming

    This Wiki article addresses blooming phase defects special to “White Mould” type cheeses such as Brie & Camembert which are generally made by adding Penicillium candidum. In addition to all the normal Coagulation, Surface, Aroma, Body, and Flavour defects, white mold cheeses also have their own special set of problems. This article is divided into the following sections:

    Blooming – Slow Bloom

    Description

    • White mould does not completely cover cheese in normal 12-14 days after making.

    Causes & Remedies

    • Ripening/aging humidity is too low, retarding bloom of white mould.
    • Ripening/aging temperature of cheese is too low, retarding bloom of white mould.
    • If dry salting formed cheese, excessive salting retarding or halting bloom of white mould.
    • If inoculating milk with Penicillium candidum, temperature of milk was too low, retarding bloom of white mould.

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    Blooming – No Or Non-Uniform Bloom

    Semi Lactic At 12 Days Uneven Mold Bloom - CheeseForum.org

    Semi Lactic At 12 Days Uneven Mold Bloom - CheeseForum.org

    Description

    • No or non-uniform/uneven bloom of white mould on whole surface of cheese.

    Causes & Remedies

    • If on bottom, bottom of cheese is in draining whey, mould will not bloom if it has it’s “feet in water”, keep drained whey away from bottom of cheese and turn more often.
    • Uneven, too much or too little salting of surface of cheese, retarding or halting bloom of white mold in certain areas or of whole cheese.
    • If applying Penicillium candidum to surface of cheese (vs to milk), uneven application.
    • Competing pathogen.
    • Antibiotics in the milk.
    • Wrong acidity.

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    Blooming – Thick Bloom

    Semi-Lactic At 20 Days, Excessive Bloom - CheeseForum.org

    Semi-Lactic At 20 Days, Excessive Bloom - CheeseForum.org

    Description

    • Thick layer of white mould on surface of cheese. If left uncontrolled will result in “slip skin” or “toad skin” where it will slip off the body of the cheese.

    Causes & Remedies

    • Excessive mould development from either excessive amount of Penicillium candidum used or cheese not wrapped as soon as white mould had completely covered the cheese.

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