Author Topic: Gouda Trial and Error #2  (Read 835 times)

Offline Mike Richards

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Gouda Trial and Error #2
« on: August 04, 2012, 10:29:16 PM »
Gouda #2 for me today didn't work out as I had hoped.  Before I put down what I did, I'd like to mention the chart that I've attached.  I plotted my pH curves for both of my Goudas and for the Peter Dixon recipe and the recipe from Washington Cheese Guild.  My question is why do both of my cheeses have a precipitous drop in pH and the two recipes don't?  Here's my make:

                                                                    Temp        pH
0940   Add 1/8 tsp MM100, 1/8 tsp FD               88            6.68
1010   add 1/4 CaCl    (slow pH drop?)              87            6.67
1044   add 1/8 tsp double strength rennet          87            6.62  (still above 6.55 recommended, but I got impatient...64 minutes?)
1105   finally floc... 20 min x 3 = 60 min
1145   cut --let rest
1155   stir
1223   pH still above target (6.4-6.45) but I didn't write down how much above....wait
1318   target reached, wash curds, stir               88            6.45
1355   surprised by pH drop, press in whey        100           6.15
1410   press in press                                                       5.65
1423   move to cave...
1542   check pH, oh...brine                                              5.26

I'm going to try again tomorrow.  Though, I'm not really sure what to do about that pH drop.

Mike
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Offline Mike Richards

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Re: Gouda Trial and Error #2
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2012, 09:27:59 PM »
I opened Gouda #2 a few days ago, kept half of it to eat and bagged the other half for a while longer.  While it doesn't taste to me like what I think of when I think of Gouda, it's my first semi-hard cheese to taste like...well...cheese.  My wife, in fact, said, she liked it--which, also, is a first.  With most of my aged cheeses, she has lied to me say, "No, really, it's good." But this time, she actually means it.  So, while I'm not totally satisfied with the results, I'm pleased.  Hopefully the others will be as good and better...

Here is a picture.  The texture was good--pliable, easy to slice (didn't "gum up" like others I have made).  I don't have the experience or the vocabulary to describe the flavor.  If I were to try, I'd include "a little buttery" and "a tiny bitter aftertaste".  I was surprised by the holes.  I thought I had done a good job of pressing under the whey.  I'm not good at distinguishing between gas holes and mechanical holes, but I presume these are mechanical.
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Offline mightyMouse.tar.gz

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Re: Gouda Trial and Error #2
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2012, 09:35:26 PM »
What software did you use to make that plot?
// bad cheese exception handling
try { Cheese myCheese = new Gouda(); } catch (NastyCheeseException e) { throw new CultureContaminationException(); }

Offline Mike Richards

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Re: Gouda Trial and Error #2
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2012, 09:40:54 PM »
I used excel to make the plot, copied and pasted it into power point and saved the slide as a JPEG--there's probably a more direct way to get a jpg of an excel plot, but I don't know of one.  Here's the excel file if you'd like to mess with it.  I've added the Joy of Cheese Making's Gouda recipe pH profile to the chart, as well, though it's not annotated.
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Offline mightyMouse.tar.gz

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Re: Gouda Trial and Error #2
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2012, 09:50:37 PM »
Hey, it looks great in my opinion!
// bad cheese exception handling
try { Cheese myCheese = new Gouda(); } catch (NastyCheeseException e) { throw new CultureContaminationException(); }


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Gouda Trial and Error #2
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2012, 10:19:15 PM »
Yes, mechanical. And based on flavor description, try it in another 4-6 weeks. Should be surprised at improvement. Looks like a nice cheese. Awesome job :)

to answer your question
Quote
why do both of my cheeses have a precipitous drop in pH and the two recipes don't?
Have found this to be a consequence of size and scale. Measuring tiny amounts of DVI and doing smaller batches makes it hard to dial in the acidity, and oddities happen such as longer lag times.
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Offline Mike Richards

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Re: Gouda Trial and Error #2
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2012, 10:56:57 PM »
Thanks, Mighty mouse.

Pav,

Thanks for the reply.  I've started using a scale to measure out my cultures, so I can at least be a little more consistent.  Do you have any idea at what size things become more manageable?  I'm setting up a turkey roaster vat (as described by Yoav) that will let me do 4 (5 if I push it) gallon batches.  I've only used it a couple of times--would you expect that size to be more easily controlled, or still too small?

I'll report on the other half in 4-6 weeks.  Thanks, again.
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Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: Gouda Trial and Error #2
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2012, 11:11:31 PM »
It is also the case that real world acidification doesn't always follow the recipe. This is why we use indicators (I use visual indicators, that's how I learned. most use pH because it's easy) to tell us when a recipe reaches its proper acidity for the next step. Environmental factors can affect the workings of the culture -things like air temp, humidity, and pressure and elevation.

here is a link to the culture I use. look at the curve there, it takes a nice plunge during the time of the make, and another sharp super sharp plunge during the pressing (which is why it's important to keep heat in this cheese while you press)
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CCEQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.agroscope.admin.ch%2Fkaese%2F04408%2F04428%2Findex.html%3Flang%3Dde%26download%3DNHzLpZeg7t%2Clnp6I0NTU042l2Z6ln1acy4Zn4Z2qZpnO2Yuq2Z6gpJCDeYR_hGym162epYbg2c_JjKbNoKSn6A--&ei=4bmIUOjqHOXzyAGHtIHgDA&usg=AFQjCNHiRGZbRfzR6WWJgGNNkYziTymWNg

I wouldn't fret too much about that curve of yours, unless it forces you to work way ahead of schedule.

And those are mechanical holes, see how choppy their shape is? gas holes would be smooth and mostly round. Either your curd was a little harder than the recipe intended, and so didn't press well under the weight, or you just plain pressed too light. Won't hurt anything, just doesn't look as nice and may cause problems when it comes to slicing.
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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Gouda Trial and Error #2
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2012, 11:18:24 PM »
Quote
Do you have any idea at what size things become more manageable? 
Hard question to answer succinctly. FD is fermented all together as undefined strains, then lyophilized. MM is defined strains cultured separately and reblended then packaged. In that mixing process, it sometimes happens that within a pouch, the distribution is a bit uneven. That's not the only factor. DVI in general follows that type of behavior where the lag is longer.

What I have seen work better is to start adding the DVI when milk hits 72F on its way up during your heat period. The wake-up is more gentle then. And yes, using microscales does help.
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