Author Topic: Freeze skyr for later culturing?  (Read 642 times)

Offline kstaley

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Freeze skyr for later culturing?
« on: August 19, 2012, 04:42:08 PM »
Does anyone have any experience with freezing skyr for later culturing?  I've just brought home from Iceland some traditional farmstead skyr. In addition to eating some with cream and milk, I'm making my first batch of skyr with it tomorrow.  It is unlikely that I will keep it in continuous production at home.  Could I freeze a small amount for later use?  As I understand it, the primary bacteria are streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.  Thanks!


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Offline sigurdur

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Re: Freeze skyr for later culturing?
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2012, 04:00:10 PM »
I think you should be OK with freezing skyr.

I don't have any experience in freezing skyr since I simply take a 2 minute walk to the superstore to buy some ;-)

You can perform an experiment with it, freeze some for a week and try to re-culture it after the weeks time.
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Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: Freeze skyr for later culturing?
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2012, 09:29:49 PM »
It will need to be reactivated before it will make a proper batch. This is generally how a frozen culture works.

This is a simple process, just take the frozen sky and mix it with a small amount of milk and treat like you would to make yoghurt. It is weak, so it will not work very strongly and make a thin yoghurt, but this can then be used as culture for skyr or cheese, or whatever you wish to make.
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