Author Topic: Butterkase #1  (Read 3763 times)

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #15 on: August 24, 2012, 02:27:00 PM »
Thanks Sailor.  Yes, there are so many things to take into account.  I'm playing with the ripening time in my recent batches to see how things change as a result.  Whether what works for me with my set up (frozen ice cubes of starter ; homognized/pasturized milk ; etc) will translate well to someone elses situation is hard to predict.  Unfortunately, with pH meters running well over $300 here, I'm not likely to get one soon, so I can't be sure where in the pH curve I am at any point.  I have to experiment to see what effect that has on the end result.  But, I do take into account the advice from those more experienced than I am when I start to tweak things.

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Offline Shazah

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #16 on: August 24, 2012, 04:34:00 PM »
Whether what works for me with my set up (frozen ice cubes of starter ; homognized/pasturized milk ; etc) will translate well to someone elses situation is hard to predict.  Unfortunately, with pH meters running well over $300 here

Hi Jeff

I'm not sure if you know but our Farmhouse brand (purple label, silver top) is non-homogenised.  It's slightly more expensive, but I often get it on special at Pak'N Save.
I also purchased a small pack of PH strips from our local brew shop for $5.00.  I haven't used them yet, and I can see they won't give as precise a reading as a PH Metre but will be better than nothing for my first experiment (and Yoav didn't scream No, No, No when I told him I was going to use them)... phew that was a relief  >:D

Cheers
Sharon
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― Anthony Bourdain

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #17 on: August 24, 2012, 04:41:31 PM »
I do have to add, when using Mother Cultures, even from frozen cubes, these are not as big an issue. The bacteria are already rehydrated and ready to go. So, it doesn't take long for early mesos to kick in.
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #18 on: August 24, 2012, 11:11:17 PM »
Hi Shazah,

Yes, the silver top is very good for cheesemaking.  I've used it a few times.  It's higher fat content as well.  I've found Home Brand Standard works fine as well, although it is homongenised. 

Hi Sailor,

So is the issue with the dry culture just mostly getting the time for it to get going?  With cubes, etc, wouldn't ripening time still affect where you are on the acidity curve because the cultures are still mutlipliying over time, etc.?  Or is it that since the mother cultures just get to work, they tend to produce enough meso culture even in a short time?

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline bbracken677

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2012, 12:19:41 PM »
A picture of the "boys"...

So far, so good. I take them out for some air, brine wash and room temp for a couple hours every couple of days or so. They are looking good, nice dry rind and delicious aroma so far.


Offline bbracken677

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2012, 04:00:40 PM »
Classic Butterkase uses just a thermo culture so heating to 102F is perfect. However, several people on the Forum have been adding Mesos to the mix. That's fine, but if you want much effect, 102F is too warm for the initial addition of Meso starter.

I think I will try another make soon and use just thermo....is there a recommended one?

I have ALP D and Choozit SU Casu (Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus helveticus)...Would one be more appropriate than the other?


Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #21 on: August 30, 2012, 04:37:05 PM »
Thermos are generally not used as a single culture solution. The classic combination is Streptococcus thermophilus (like TA-61), which is the primary acidifier, and  something like LH-100 with Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus lactis. These two complete the lactose conversion. I have not used Su Casu but it does contain what you need. However, the ratios of the 2 sets of bacteria can have a big effect on flavor and texture. For example, I use a 50/50 blend of TA-61 and LH-100 with Swiss and a 20/80 blend with Parmesan. With a one packet multi species culture, you don't have the ability to change the ratio.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #22 on: August 30, 2012, 04:41:36 PM »
Thanks Sailor!  You have given me much to consider. I think I may try a small make with the Choozit CASU and see how it compares with the previous make once ripened.

Looking for the right texture and that buttery, creamy taste!   


Offline bbracken677

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2012, 12:01:21 PM »
Question: I noticed that with swiss cheeses you apparently (after about 10 days) remove them from the cave (once the rind has formed) and let them age at room temp for about another 10 days to form the eyes.
Is this something that would be done with a butterkase? I didn't see anything about that in the recipe notes.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2012, 12:04:56 PM »
With Swiss, the room temp period is to activate the Propionic shermanii. That produces CO2 to form eyes, and it produces propionic acid which contributes to the Swiss flavor. There would be no reason to do room temp for Butterkase.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #25 on: September 10, 2012, 12:07:30 PM »
I put LM57 in it...which produces some CO2, and the butterkase I have eaten had small eye formations in them.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #26 on: September 10, 2012, 02:21:04 PM »
Propionic shermanii needs room temp to activate. The Leuc m. cremoris in LM57 does not.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline bbracken677

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Re: Butterkase #1
« Reply #27 on: September 10, 2012, 02:22:13 PM »
ahh...ok Thanks!