Author Topic: Curd Cheese Making Recipe - Fresh/Unriped  (Read 815 times)

Offline brentphx

  • New Cheese
  • *
  • Location: Phoenix, Az
  • Posts: 3
  • Cheeses: 0
  • Default personal text
Curd Cheese Making Recipe - Fresh/Unriped
« on: August 27, 2012, 05:43:38 PM »
I've read almost every post going back months on this forum, but I finally made a batch of curds yesterday from a cheddar recipe (basic recipe from the wiki here).  I can't recall reading any dealing with curds intended for eating, not pressing.  We can't really get curds here in Arizona so I figured I'd just have to make them myself.  It was an experiment to see how my local homogenized/pasteurized store milk would perform (wasn't super accurate on measurements, no ph meter or litmus paper).  I really wanted to test my stove/equipment before  I spend $10/gal on raw cow or a bit less for raw goat that I can get locally and outfit the kitchen with new toys. 

It went great, heated, added 1/8 tsp starter (meso, thecheesemaker.com, 60min), added just shy of 1 tsp CaCl dissolved,  then rennet (veal rennet per label, thecheesemaker.com), 15 min floc time, clean break in 45 after that.  I cut curd, waited, held at 102 for just over an hour, drained, and salted/stacked at 102 for ~ an hour flipping/rearranging every 10.  I only did a light dusting of salt and only for the first 3 flips.  It didn't really say how long to do this step for.  I could've gone longer, but I was in a hurry to eat some!!

The curds were just a bit too moist to be squeaky but tasted almost like what I remember from the tilamook factory but just a bit more bland and spongy.  I added a pinch more salt dusted over the whole batch and put them in plastic containers (thought I'd share with work/family).  This morning, they weren't quite as good as last night... and this afternoon they're definitely not as good.  They have gotten more moist to the point where some whey has developed in the container, they're sweating just a bit.  That said, I have a feeling that if I had a press this would've made a decent cheese- it's decently firm and tasty, just too moist.

Here's where my question comes in- To get them drier on the next batch, should I A ) cheddar them longer, B) raise the water bath temp when cheddaring, C) more salt, or D) All of the above?   Or, is it something I haven't thought of yet... could my issue be caused before that point- related to not stirring enough during the cooking of the curds? 

Is there a good way to stop the development at the curds stage just to eat a batch (understanding that store milk will not have the same quality curds as raw and that pasteurization is a good idea when eating raw)?  I'm driving my wife nuts reading so much about cheesemaking before ever actually making any, but I love the chemistry of it and that's just how I work!!  I'm trying not to test too many variables at once, scientific method and all- just looking for an informed opinion since we definitely have some chemists on this forum! I can post pics or specifics on any step if it would help anyone diagnose!


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline bbracken677

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Dallas, Tx
  • Posts: 1,166
  • Cheeses: 16
  • I love me some cheese!
Re: Curd Cheese Making Recipe - Fresh/Unriped
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2012, 06:46:12 AM »
I am not sure you can just stop the development of the curds entirely, but you could try raising the temp of the curds to 108 with a hot water bath, stir for a few minutes, let rest and then perhaps after draining off some of the whey/water hit it with cold water to drop the temp back to inside the 70s (cold as in 60F or less). Then perform your milling and salting of the curds...perhaps try just a tad bit more salt as well...that will draw some of the whey out.

There are more knowledgeable people out there who may have a better idea but in all honesty, I dont know that you can just stop the curds from developing further.

Offline george (MaryJ)

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Rhode Island
  • Posts: 520
  • Cheeses: 22
  • Home of the Velcro Ocelot
Re: Curd Cheese Making Recipe - Fresh/Unriped
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2012, 07:50:27 AM »
A while back LB posted a recipe/link to his fresh curd recipe (I think it was buried inside another thread, not a thread all on its own).  Anyway, dthelmers took that and ran with it to create a recipe for a fast-ripening cheddar - that thread, if you're interested, is here:

http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,9225.0.html

Helpfully, he also posted the link to the original fresh curd recipe in his thread ... and 'tis thusly:  http://wacheese.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80:fresh-cheddar-curd-extended-shelf-life&catid=43:moderate-cook-temp&Itemid=66

 Thus ends the exercise of my freakish memory.  :)
If I have to be a grownup, can I at least be telekinetic too?

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,515
  • Cheeses: 125
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Re: Curd Cheese Making Recipe - Fresh/Unriped
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2012, 08:21:38 AM »
108F will kill the mesos.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline brentphx

  • New Cheese
  • *
  • Location: Phoenix, Az
  • Posts: 3
  • Cheeses: 0
  • Default personal text
Re: Curd Cheese Making Recipe - Fresh/Unriped
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2012, 02:37:39 PM »
Well, I do believe I'll be trying that recipe... and maybe heating the curd a bit hotter! Thanks for the replies!!


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline MrsKK

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Wisconsin
  • Posts: 1,867
  • Cheeses: 61
  • Default personal text
Re: Curd Cheese Making Recipe - Fresh/Unriped
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2012, 07:42:13 AM »
I just posted the recipe that I use in my cheesemaking classes.  I've tried cheddar for making curds, but it didn't have much flavor, IMHO.  I found that I really liked Colby curds when fresh, though.  Here's the link.

I have noticed that the best curds are very salty when the salt is first added, but that after a few hours, the salt is drawn into the curds, while drawing out excess whey, which should be drained.

Fresh curds are best when eaten fresh - within 24 hours.  If they are older than that, they will lose their squeak, but you can put them in the microwave for 20-30 seconds and the squeak will return.