Author Topic: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1  (Read 2825 times)

Offline Bob

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Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« on: August 31, 2012, 10:35:39 PM »
Attempting my first Caerphilly today. I've been inspired by Canadian Kiwi Jeff, Tiarella and OzzieCheese Mal who have all posted great examples of this cheese, and many other forum members who have also posted their recipes and techniques. Up to now, I've concentrated on soft ripened cheeses and Fetta, so after attending a Cheddar cheesemaking class a couple of weeks ago, to make sure I understood the basics of these styles, I'm ready to have a go.

My recipe is from "Home Cheesemaking" by Neil and Carol Willman, an Australian book that I have used extensively.

8 litres fresh cows milk from a local farm, pasteurized at home
Add 160ml MA16 meso mother culture and 1.5ml CaCl, ripen for 30 minutes at 32C
Add 1.6ml rennet floc time 11:30 time 3 = 32:30 minutes rennet time
Clean break, cut into 1cm cubes and rest 5 minutes
Stir continuously for 15 minutes, very gently initially so as not to break up curds
Stir another 15 minutes while heating to 35C
Hold at 35C and stir another 15 minutes.
Let curd settle for 30 minutes to develop acidity
Drain whey and pile curds on sides of vat
Trim curds pile to a neat block and let sit for 30 minutes, removing whey as it drains
Cut curd into finger length chips and pile on side of vat, then drain for another 45 minutes (this is where I am currently)
Cut into 25mm cubes and mix in 8g salt (this seems like a very small amount of salt?)
Pile into hoop and leave for 20 minutes before pressing
Press for 1.5 hours, remove, redress and then press overnight.
Brine in 20% solution, dry and store. I'm proposing to use a vacuum bag for this one.

Here are some photos:

I'll post an update later today.


« Last Edit: September 01, 2012, 04:37:12 AM by Bob »
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2012, 11:35:07 PM »
Looking good so far Bob!  I usually cut into my caerphilly after 3 weeks, so I don't bother with vac bagging it or waxing.  It may develop a bit of wild geo, but that's normal for this cheese anyway.  It's a good cheese when young (should be slightly sour, but not unpleasantly so, think cream cheese, and may be a bit salty).  Flipping, redressing, etc a few times (say, every 20 to 30 minutes) for the first hour or two can help form a decent rind, which then protects the inners.  If you vac seal or wax too early, the moisture you trap in can cause the cheese to rot, so keep an eye on it. 

- Jeff
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2012, 01:37:09 AM »
Nice write-up and pics, Bob!  Good stuff.

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Offline Bob

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2012, 03:03:53 AM »
Thanks guys for the support.  :)

Here are the rest of the photos and some initial observations.

Today was the first time I have used the floc method. My floc time was 10m:50s so a total rennet time of 32m:30s, which was right in the mid point for my recipe. If I had been using my usual "time and clean break" I would probably have let it sit for another 5-10 minutes. I thought the curds were a little softer than usual, they seemed to break up a little during the initial stirring, but overall, still a good result.

The heating step was a bit challenging, but it actually worked out well, rising from 29 to 35C in 15 minutes quite evenly. My basic equipment is a plastic vat sitting in a roasting pan of water, over a gas flame. I think this equipment will be a limitation when I make more cheddars and washed curd cheeses, so I will have to consider upgrading to a "bain marie" style system, which will have the added advantage of a bigger make :)

I started off pressing at 0.75psi for just over an hour before increasing to 1.5psi. My simple press requires a lot of weight to get these pressures and it is a bit unstable. Might have to source a dutch style press!

So far, the knit is looking good, will turn once more before letting it settle in for the night.

Tomorrow I'll post some photos of the finished cheese!

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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2012, 01:52:06 PM »
Well done.  There's a bit of a "thought shift" when switching to the floc method.  The curds can be a bit softer with the floc method because clean break often suggests something much harder than it should be.  The longer you let the rennet work, the harder the curds will be (in terms of clean breakiness - they will also produce a moister cheese, all other things being equal).  Anyway, after a few makes you'll get the feel for it, and you'll gentle up on your early stirring technique.  Just jiggle the curds for the first 5 to 10 minutes (as in set up a wave motion through the curds rather than stir them) and as they firm up increase the agitation level.  This is especially important if you use store bought milk, or if you pasturize quickly (the 15 second method; if you pasturize at a lower temp for 30 minutes it might be less of a problem? I've forgotten the temps at the moment and can only recall the times).

Anyway, I've been using floc for almost all my makes except the first couple.  I've not had a problem, and from what I understand (which admittedly is very little), this is one of the steps that should help produce a more consistent result.  Sounds like your rennet amounts are bang on, so well done.

- Jeff
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2012, 05:56:10 PM »
That first pic looks like cubed cooked chicken breast. Wow, impressive press!  ::)

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Offline Bob

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2012, 08:44:25 PM »
Thanks for the feedback.

Yes Jeff, I'll keep using the floc method, I'll just be a bit wary of the softer curd to start with. I like your idea of very gently stirring, I try to be gentle but get a bit enthusiastic sometimes!

Boofer, my press is very fundamental, but works well. Just have to be careful it doesn't overbalance, you know how the cheese can get a bit wobbly sometimes! The bucket has 10 litres of water in it. I need to get some better weights, maybe some gym weights will be less unstable.

Here is the final cheese, out of the press, just over 1kg, and into the brine. Very happy, good knit.  :D
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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2012, 09:33:02 PM »
Hi Bob,
Welcome the world of hard cheeses. Caerphilly is a wonderful place to start.  The thing I find amazing about the whole process is the number of way there are to achieve the same outcome.  I noticed you brine your cheese.  I use the direct salt method where everytime the cheese goes into the mold is gets salted, a total of 4 times. I don't wax this one either as I like the rind to be nice and dry.  I air dry mine until very dry (3-5 days) turning a couple of times a day and put it into the 'Cheese Cave' @ 10-12 Degrees.  To give the rind a bit of character I control the unwanted moulds with straight Apple Cider vinegar.  The image is my latest Caerphilly @ 3 weeks.  This is a 10 Litre Cheese and currently weighing in @ 1.54 Kg.
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2012, 01:09:24 AM »
Absolutely gorgeous cheese, Bob. I have got to get me one of those moulds. Very snazzy effect.

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Offline Bob

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2012, 02:55:39 AM »
Thanks Boofer! Used the same mould for my True Blue, yeah I like the effect.

Mal, that's a very nice looking Caerphilly! And your yield is really high for 10 litres milk. Did you add extra cream?

I'll be drying this for 3-4 days then into a mini cave in my cheese fridge @ 10 to 12C.
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2012, 09:19:08 AM »
Bob! Really nice looking cheese there!  The form almost makes it look like a basket...a really tasty basket made of cheesy goodness.

Grats!

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2012, 03:32:54 PM »
Hi Bob, Yep, I put 300ml of cream with the 10 litres. I think it was why i ended up with a cheese with a bit of a waist :P  Bit like it's creator.  I'll post a couple of photos when I cut it open next week.  I'm starting on my Christmas cheeses this week, Colby and Manchago.  Remember flipping twice a day whilst drying and daily after that.

--Mal
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Offline Bob

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2012, 04:37:57 PM »
That makes sense Mal.  Bet it will taste terrific, look forward to the photos.
And thanks for the positive comments bbracken.

For those that like the hoop I have used, it is an Anelli P00682. Approximate dimensions are Top dia 148mm, Base dia 132mm and height 130mm. I noticed iratherfly used the same hoop for his Tommes.
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Offline Bob

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #13 on: September 08, 2012, 06:26:00 AM »
Update : Thought I would post an update, 1 week on. The cheese went into a mini cave in my cheese fridge after drying for 3 days. It has been turned daily since then. The cheese is looking and smelling divine, even at this early stage of development. No sign of any wild moulds yet, but a few spots of white looking powdery residue in a couple of places. Can't wait to try it, just have to be patient!   :)
« Last Edit: September 08, 2012, 06:37:22 AM by Bob »
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Aussie Bob's Caerphilly #1
« Reply #14 on: September 08, 2012, 12:16:45 PM »
Looking good.  You can give it an occasional wash with a strong brine if you want to keep it clean.  I don't bother most times myself, but have done it in the past. 

Those basket moulds are good for manchego, to give the traditional look.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.