Author Topic: Tomme Rind Issue  (Read 1033 times)

Offline Leanu

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Tomme Rind Issue
« on: September 10, 2012, 11:15:37 AM »
Greetings All,

The tomme I made a month ago seemed to be aging nicely, but has now cracked on both sides.  The outside is very firm, yellow in color with a few mold spores popping up on occasion, these I just wipe off.  I was wondering what I could do with my next tomme to address the cracking issue, and if there is anything I can do with this one to repair the cracks.

I used a slightly modified version of Linuxboy's tomme recipe found in this category, and brined it in a salt bath for 3 1/2 hours before letting it airdry and then age in a refrigerator dedicated to cheese at about 53 degrees.

Any suggestions?

Leanu


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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Tomme Rind Issue
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2012, 11:32:36 AM »
What is the humidity of your cheese cave?  Was it exposed inside the fridge or did it have it's own "minicave" (container)?



Offline linuxboy

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Re: Tomme Rind Issue
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2012, 11:33:05 AM »
What is fridge humidity? Also, modified how? More moist paste? Low humidity + higher moisture in the paste would lead to cracking.

To repair the cracks, patch them with butter.
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Offline Leanu

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Re: Tomme Rind Issue
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2012, 12:01:24 PM »
I am not sure of the fridge humidity, I have a bowl of water in it, it is a small fridge, and the cheese itself is not in a container.  It is modified by spending more time to get to the proper temperatures, and I believe it is a bit harder than it should be.  I will repair this one and hope to nail the recipe on tomorrow's attempt!

Leanu

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Tomme Rind Issue
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2012, 12:05:37 PM »
Longer time with same stirring, more stirring, or less stirring? Because time by itself is only one factor. Tommes vary between 37 and 42% moisture based on these small tweaks of curd size, set time, temp, and agitation schedule.

I think if the cheese is cracking, the cheese is loosing too much moisture too fast into the air, meaning humidity is low.
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Offline BobE102330

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Re: Tomme Rind Issue
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2012, 01:37:21 PM »
Your humidity is likely very low.  My 3 cubic foot fridge would only get 50-60% RH with a 13" x 9" pan.  I now have a large microfiber cloth held up by bamboo skewers that get me in the 80-85% range. 

While not the most accurate, cigar box hygrometers are under $10.  I have an indoor outdoor wireless thermometer/hygrometer that cost around $35.  Someday soon I intend to calibrate it. 

Offline bbracken677

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Re: Tomme Rind Issue
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2012, 01:56:43 PM »
I bought a digital hygrometer/thermometer from Amazon.com for $10...It has been really useful and as far as I can tell very accurate.
http://www.amazon.com/Acu-Rite-Indoor-Humidity-Monitor/dp/B0013BKDO8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1347303329&sr=8-1&keywords=hygrometer

Offline Leanu

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Re: Tomme Rind Issue
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2012, 02:16:21 PM »
Hey all,

Thanks for all of the input.  I will be ordering a hygrometer today.  I was assuming that the humidity was high enough because the bottom of the cheese would feel moist upon turning it.  I will figure that out quickly and hopefully have my new equipment by the time my next cheese is ready for the "cave".

Leanu

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Tomme Rind Issue
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2012, 02:27:13 PM »
It's tough to keep humidity up in small areas, especially if they are not loaded up with cheese. Every time you open the door, it upsets the balance for 4-6 hours until there's equilibrium again, and over months, this adds up in drawing moisture away from the cheese. Cracking is due to moisture loss almost always, so suspect that's the situation here.
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Offline Glenda

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Re: Tomme Rind Issue
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2012, 03:53:48 PM »
How do you make a slury out of the rine of a tomme? Saw one posted with the rine an milk, was this added to the milk at the start of the batch? Or did i miss read that?


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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Tomme Rind Issue
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2012, 04:09:04 PM »
One thing you can do, is to take a portion of an existing rind and mash it up in a small amount of non-chlorinated water with a bit of salt (perhaps a 2-3% brine?) and once that is well mixed and fairly thin you can smear that on your cheese to promote some growth.

I am currently doing something similar with a blue cheese. Hoping it works as well as it has for others here  ;)