Author Topic: First Caerphilly, inspired by JeffHamm  (Read 916 times)

Offline Shazah

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First Caerphilly, inspired by JeffHamm
« on: September 21, 2012, 05:41:09 PM »
I made my first Caerphilly yesterday and followed Jeff's make.  It looks fantastic and I can't wait to eat it.  I'm already thinking it will be a regular for our house.

I trimmed a little off the top where the follower didn't quite fit, and it already tastes delicious.

I used our Farmhouse brand milk, which I think is a little creamier than the standard in Jeff's make, but as usual, I had a problem with flocculation.  After 20 minutes my little bowl didn't even look like slowing down so I gave up on that and waited 60 minutes.  It still needed a further 10 minutes before I got a clean break.  I think Yoav may have mentioned the extra cream makes for a longer curd set time when I was following his Reblochon recipe.

My question is, even though I'm using a double strength calf rennet, should I be increasing the dose in order to shorten the flocculation time.  I've always been a bit wary about putting too much rennet in as I know that can have a bitter effect on the cheese.

Other than that, all went well.  Thanks Jeff  8)
You have to be a romantic to invest yourself, your money, and your time in cheese.
― Anthony Bourdain

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: First Caerphilly, inspired by JeffHamm
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2012, 05:49:52 PM »
That looks really good Shazah! 

The silvertop does have more cream in it (over 4% I believe, while the homebrand is around 3.3%), and it's creamlined, so this should turn out just fine.  What calf rennet are you using (is it liquid?) and do you know the strength in IMCU (international milk coagulating units).  Even if you just have the brand I might be able to track down the info and work out the amount I would use and compare it with what you are using.  If you're using Renco, for example, you would need about 6.5-7 mls.  If you're not getting floc in 10-15 minutes, then increase your rennet.  Although too much can produce bitterness, too much would be something that flocs in 5 minutes type thing.  You're clearly not close to that yet.


A cheese to you!

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Shazah

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Re: First Caerphilly, inspired by JeffHamm
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2012, 11:16:04 PM »
Thanks Jeff.

I'm using Naturen 280 double strength, calf rennet and I've only had it a couple of months, so it's not out of date, although I see it has no use-by date.

When I first learned to make cheese, I was given a formula to calculate the rennet, based on the quantity of milk.  I always use that calculation, even if the recipe says otherwise.

The calculation, based on double strength rennet is .5 mls for each 8 litres of milk.  Dilute the rennet with at least 20 times it's volume in cool, boiled water.  So based on that formula, I used .7 mls of rennet in 14 mls of water.  I use a pipette and small medical measuring cup so I'm able to measure it pretty close.

As I'm starting to see a trend with long floc times, I'm assuming this double strength rennet is not as strong as my earlier batch and I need to increase the dose, slightly??
You have to be a romantic to invest yourself, your money, and your time in cheese.
― Anthony Bourdain

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: First Caerphilly, inspired by JeffHamm
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2012, 02:21:05 AM »
Hi Shazah,

I would try about 1.6 ml for a 10 litre make (just adjust proportionatly; it would be about 1.3 ml for 8 litres).  I've got some 280 strength calf rennet as well and 1.6 ml put into an egg cup of boiled, then cooled, water gives me a floc in the 12 to 13 minute range.

I've put together an excel workbook which I've attached here.  One of the pages has a rennet calculator which I put together based upon my own experiences.  You can adjust the "default" to your own situation, but I've found 0.6 ml of 750 strength works good for 10 L; so I base calculations off of that; has worked every time I've tried a new rennet.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Shazah

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Re: First Caerphilly, inspired by JeffHamm
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2012, 04:45:53 AM »
Thanks Jeff

I will study this a little closer tomorrow.

I've also looked online at Naturen guidelines and they say 1ml for 10 litres of milk, so clearly I have to increase for future makes.
You have to be a romantic to invest yourself, your money, and your time in cheese.
― Anthony Bourdain

Offline margaretsmall

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Re: First Caerphilly, inspired by JeffHamm
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2012, 04:36:27 PM »
I use 280 DS calf rennet from Cheeselinks (Victoria, Australia) and the recommended dosage is 1.25ml to 10l milk. I've been using 1ml to 8l (as much milk as I can handle) and I usually have flocc. in about 14 minutes. So definitely use a bit more.
Margaret

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: First Caerphilly, inspired by JeffHamm
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2012, 03:02:32 PM »
Hi Shazah,

I made my 2nd tomme using silver top.  I must say, I had forgotten how much better the curds are from it than from the homogenized milk.  I suspect your caerphilly will be wonderful.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Shazah

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Re: First Caerphilly, inspired by JeffHamm
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2012, 05:09:02 PM »
It is lovely milk to use that's for sure, and the next best thing if you don't have easy access to a friendly farmer.  I know it's more expensive but I usually don't want to compromise the prospect of a perfect cheese for the sake of a few extra $'s.

I'm gearing up to make my first Cambozola next weekend.  I love most blue cheese and I love camembert so the combo of the two sounds too inviting for me to pass up.  I did read with interest Yoav's comment in another thread that more cream does not equate to creamier cheese, so I will try and resist the urge to add more cream  ???

I will follow your Tomme story too.  My next project will be something similar, perhaps with a Cabernet/Syrah bath?

I feel like half the day has gone with our switchover to daylight saving.  It's so nice out there, mmm I might suggest a drive out to Puhoi Cheese   :P
You have to be a romantic to invest yourself, your money, and your time in cheese.
― Anthony Bourdain

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: First Caerphilly, inspired by JeffHamm
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2012, 05:32:39 PM »
Hi Shazah,

I use Silvertop for the semilactics, and Tararau's buttermilk and De Winkle yogurt both work well as starters too.  I've also used creme fresh once as well (I forgot to write down the brand).  I've found Onewhero blue cheese gives a very good blue, but it's very aggressive and I let my stiltonesque ripen too long.  Next one I'll ripen much shorter, to undershoot, and work up to the optimal window.

Anyway, it's a great day out there.  Hope you enjoyed the sun.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.