Author Topic: My 2nd Tomme  (Read 7055 times)

Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #45 on: October 15, 2012, 09:21:10 PM »
Right, and that may mean that you have to keep everything suppressed until the rind starts to dry of a little. At least that is how it works in our aging cellar. If we let a cheese go in the beginning, it gets covered with blue. But if we keep it cleaned until it's a little drier than other molds can do better.
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #46 on: October 16, 2012, 11:47:32 AM »
Exactly.  When it's early on and damp, blue just takes hold.  But it needs to be damp right now to get the b.linen coat.  Now that I've got that going sufficiently, I can ease that back so the surface dries, and try and get something other than blue on top.  I think things are under control at the moment, if only just, and in a couple of weeks it will be ok to brush it down as by then the b.linen surface can be removed.  Probabably won't wash it off though as the brushings should take care of it.  We'll see.

- Jeff
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #47 on: October 24, 2012, 12:04:37 PM »
Hi,

It's now got a good b.linens rind.  There's also patches of mould along the sides.  Along one ridge is a dark brown, that looks like dirt, but I think it's just very dark linens or something.  The cheese is not soft there, and it doesn't have an off smell to it (beyond the offness that the linens has so it doesn't appear to be anything like rot.  I'll probably let this rind do its thing until the weekend, or the weekend after, then wash it off and see if we can get a mould rind going.  I think the linens have just got to the point where they will dominate the rind completely if not removed. 

- Jeff
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Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #48 on: October 24, 2012, 12:33:29 PM »
we get a brown dirt that will grow on our cheese if we let them do their thing and go wild. Looks kind of nasty really. And once it's well established, it will actually start creating piles of dust -the first time I saw it, it reminded me of wood-boring larva and the piles of sawdust they leave by their bore holes. But close inspection and study and so forth has revealed it is definitely not a bug, but some kind of mold or bacteria. I haven't a clue what it is though. I just know it shows up invariably whenever I let a cheese go wild (which I rarely do, I am a particular washer of my cheeses.)

I would suggest just to smear your mold around, not to scrape or wash anything off. I have done this in the past on a b.linen rind and it has worked for me. I have one right now that has a very frightening combination of molds growing on it that I did just this with, and it seems to be working well. (A cheese that had a few errors in the pressing, so I gave up on it for a while, but ultimately just decided to go with it)
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #49 on: October 24, 2012, 02:01:11 PM »
Thanks.  I may at least try and wash around the brown dirt and see if I can get rid of that.  The mould that is on this cheese hasn't increased since I washed it last and I think the linens is out competing it.  But, a few 3% brine washes and maybe things will even out.  It's a bit undecided at the moment.

- Jeff
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Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #50 on: October 24, 2012, 02:55:01 PM »
I washedmy crazy cheese with orange juice. Kind of experiment to see how it works out. I want to develop a good mold/fungus paste on the rind and also it needed some hydration, it has dried off and nothing was wanting to grow very fast aside from some very slow geo.
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser

Offline Tiarella

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #51 on: October 24, 2012, 05:15:43 PM »
Wow, I'm glad to notice some other creative (crazy?) folks wiling to risk.  Just walking through the woods up to the barn I was wondering about putting honey all over a cheese and using it to adhere leaves to create an interesting design.  Do you think that would work?  I can't remember what I've read about using honey on cheese......  and what type of cheese should I do it on?  I have to make cheese every few days to keep up with milk so I'm not worried about wastage.

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #52 on: October 25, 2012, 01:23:06 AM »
I was wondering about putting honey all over a cheese and using it to adhere leaves to create an interesting design.  Do you think that would work?
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #53 on: October 25, 2012, 12:24:59 PM »
Gave this a wash with a 4% brine solution (4g salt in 96g water) to thin the linens a bit and to see if the brown dirt mould can be halted.  It didn't come off at all, but hopefully we can prevent it from spreading.

- Jeff
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Offline Tiarella

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #54 on: October 30, 2012, 08:54:10 PM »
I was wondering about putting honey all over a cheese and using it to adhere leaves to create an interesting design.  Do you think that would work?
Check these:
-Boofer-


I did check those and did it anyway.  Here it is on day 1 and day 6.  I have done 2 olive oil "massages" and I'm hoping if I keep doing these that it'll be less hospitable to mold growth.  Or to the wild blues at least.  It's an experiment and you can see the spots where mold has tried to get a foothold.


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Offline iratherfly

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #55 on: November 17, 2012, 02:33:26 AM »
So pretty!!!!

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #56 on: November 17, 2012, 03:19:26 PM »
Hi,

As I need to free up the ripening box this one is in, I've decided to vac. bag it.  The rind has dried out, or crusted, as you can see where it's "chipped a bit", which is curious because the box itself is filled with moisture every day.  However, the cheese only lost 332g since make day.  I bagged the first one I made, and it was fine.  The linens continued to flavour the cheese and all.  I've had to forgo on letting this develope a mould rind, but I don't think that was going to happen.  The linens seem to have formed enough of a protective layer.  I could wash them off, and such, but I'm happy with how this has gone so.

- Jeff
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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #57 on: November 18, 2012, 03:41:26 PM »
That is strange that it would be so parched-looking with the condensation in the box. ???

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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #58 on: November 19, 2012, 12:59:01 PM »
Yah, it's weird.  The cheese is doing well, though.  No splitting like the last one, but then, it doesn't have that soft water-logged feel either.  Used a better milk this time (cream line) and the curds were so much better than I'm used to.  Should use it all the time.

- Jeff
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Offline Tomer1

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Re: My 2nd Tomme
« Reply #59 on: November 19, 2012, 03:34:01 PM »
That crazy orange stuff looks like the sulferic-rotting meat smelling radioactive growth I once got on a failed Roquefort, I hope yours smells better :)
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