Author Topic: Using a cheese trier  (Read 1796 times)

Offline Boofer

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Using a cheese trier
« on: September 27, 2012, 12:28:50 PM »
I decided I needed a better way of determining if my cheeses were ready to be cut. Once cut, they don't ripen quite as optimally. I've vacillated about getting a cheese trier...even considered buying and using a potato peeler or some other cylindrical tool to pull a sample out of one of my cheeses.

I shopped around and bought a middle-size trier (5-inch/127mm blade) from The Cheesemaker. I used it this morning on my Tomme #6 which is a little past 3 months affinage. When I withdrew the sample it apparently broke off and I was only able to retrieve part of the core. The paste was semi-soft and creamy. Some paste smeared/adhered to the back of the trier. I decided to replace the plug I had removed and repatch the hole so that the cheese could age just a little longer. Patching was accomplished with some of the soft inner paste, filling in the crack around the plug. I then vacuum-sealed the cheese in a new bag.

This was my first effort at using a trier. I have several more cheeses with which I will improve my sampling technique.

Here are some links on using a trier:
Trier 1
Trier 2
Trier 3

Thanks for the early Christmas gift, Honey. ;)

-Boofer-
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Online JeffHamm

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Re: Using a cheese trier
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2012, 01:07:08 PM »
Very nice.  So, when bagged, the PLA doesn't really produce a fuzzy rind.  Does it go wild if you leave it to the air?  And, most importantly, how was the taste?  You do realise you are supposed to try the bits from the trier! ;)

- Jeff

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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Using a cheese trier
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2012, 01:22:43 PM »
the rind looks like a little geo to me...I have some of that growing on my cheddars. I have elected to just lightly wipe them with 3% brine for now. Bagging will come in a few weeks for the 2 that are going to age a while. My blues developed some geo as well as a bit of b.linens (I think)...so I brushed them back and gave a light brining as well. Not sure if that will give the blue a leg up or what...blue is growing well...I would love to use Boofer's taster to see what's going on in the middle of them  :)

Offline Tiarella

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Re: Using a cheese trier
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2012, 01:42:12 PM »
Love photos.  Did it taste good?  And this is making me wonder if my honey would want to do an early xmass present of one of the cheese books I've been lusting after.  Hmmmmmm. 

But do share your taste experience.  And the after photo makes me wonder if you ever taped drywall or did plaster.  Such precision! 

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: Using a cheese trier
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2012, 04:09:43 PM »
Wow, you bought a real Boska! Originated in Bodegraven, a small town, form where I live at the other side of Gouda, where Willem Bos started around 1896 to make knives and other tools for the many cheese farmers in that area. I'm still looking for a trier like that second hand, because new they are very expensive here.... And really good pictures again!
- Herman -


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Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: Using a cheese trier
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2012, 10:03:46 PM »
Actually the proper way to use a trier is to twist as you insert.  If you simple stab it in and then twist when it's fully sunk you risk damaging the trier.  I have actually seen someone break a trier doing this on a wheel of parm.

Offline dbudge55

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Re: Using a cheese trier
« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2012, 11:27:33 PM »
I read somewhere that you can maintain the natural rind by reinserting the plug and then patching up the hole with butter. I did it once with a Caerphilly (although I used a veg peeler instead of a trier) and it worked fine. Just one of my two cents FWIW.
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Using a cheese trier
« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2012, 01:46:30 AM »
Very nice.  So, when bagged, the PLA doesn't really produce a fuzzy rind.  Does it go wild if you leave it to the air?  And, most importantly, how was the taste?  You do realise you are supposed to try the bits from the trier! ;)

- Jeff
My experience with PLA is that it develops a gritty, white Geo covering followed in due time by some linens. There are two linens in PLA. It doesn't get all fuzzy, but stays low and controlled. Removing the wheel out of the bag, there was some stickiness and aroma from the linens.

I didn't get much of a taste, but what I tasted was creamy, mild, and rich milk flavor.

Such precision! 
Beginner's luck. Thanks, Tiarella.  8)

Wow, you bought a real Boska! Originated in Bodegraven, a small town, form where I live at the other side of Gouda, where Willem Bos started around 1896 to make knives and other tools for the many cheese farmers in that area. I'm still looking for a trier like that second hand, because new they are very expensive here.... And really good pictures again!
I believe Hande also has one just like it. Wow, Herman, you're right in the thick of it!

Actually the proper way to use a trier is to twist as you insert.  If you simple stab it in and then twist when it's fully sunk you risk damaging the trier.  I have actually seen someone break a trier doing this on a wheel of parm.
I tried to rotate it as I inserted it. I'm afraid I'll have to try a few more cheeses until I get the technique down.  ;)

I read somewhere that you can maintain the natural rind by reinserting the plug and then patching up the hole with butter. I did it once with a Caerphilly (although I used a veg peeler instead of a trier) and it worked fine. Just one of my two cents FWIW.
Yeah, I had read that about butter as well. The inner paste seemed to work just fine. Might not work quite so well on a cheese with harder paste.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.