Author Topic: Difference between thermo B and thermo C cultures  (Read 1110 times)

Offline rosawoodsii

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Difference between thermo B and thermo C cultures
« on: September 28, 2012, 02:55:47 PM »
I'm currently swimming in milk, so decided to make something new--gruyere.  However, my recipe calls for Thermophilic C, and all I have is Thermo B.  Can I substitute and if so, what differences should I expect?

What is the difference between the two culture types?
Joy


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Offline dbudge55

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Re: Difference between thermo B and thermo C cultures
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2012, 04:20:28 PM »
I've made Gruyere with both - I was in the same situation that you are in now. But the Therm B was not nearly as good as the Therm C make as far as making it like other Gruyeres I've eaten. The C had a much nuttier flavor and seemed a bit sweeter. I have no idea why.
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Difference between thermo B and thermo C cultures
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2012, 04:34:20 PM »
Thermo b is: S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus culture
Thermo c is: S. thermophilus and L. helveticus culture

According to the Dairy Connection, B is best for soft and semi-soft cheeses whereas C is best for Italian and farmstead types.

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Difference between thermo B and thermo C cultures
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2012, 07:00:02 PM »
You can use B for mozz, higher moisture thermos, and swiss. Anything aged will need helveticus.
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Offline rosawoodsii

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Re: Difference between thermo B and thermo C cultures
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2012, 07:39:47 PM »
Well, I used the Thermo C in 3 gallons of milk, so I'll find out in a few weeks if it turned out okay.  Since I was experimenting anyway, I also added a small bit of MA11.  I don't know that I'll have gruyere, but I'll have something, no doubt.  The question only remains--what will it be, and will I eat it or give it to the chickens?
Joy


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Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: Difference between thermo B and thermo C cultures
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2012, 10:29:54 PM »
bbracken has your answer with the bacterial strains, and linuxboy explains why.

Lactobacillus subr. Helveticus (note, Helvetia is the latin name of Switzerland, which is officially named Confoederatio Helvitica) produces the nutty flavor you associate with long aged Alpine type cheeses, such as Gruyere. It is a long-period maturing culture that produces its flavor only very slowly.

Note though, it is not the only bacteria that can produce this nuttiness.

The culture I use, which I imported from Switzerland, doesn't have it, and it is used to make a very long term aged, extremely nutty cheese. This culture (MK 410 Lyo Kultur) contains

Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis
Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus
Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis
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Offline camgray100

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Re: Difference between thermo B and thermo C cultures
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2012, 01:49:13 AM »
Okay, so, does this mean I can sub Thermo C for Thermo B in making soft cheese? I am curious because you mentioned that you wanted to have the C for the purpose of aging? Is the moisture the only thing that needs to be manipulated when subbing, or, if I use the C will my soft cheeses be devoid of moisture?

I'm making an American Styled Brie but I'm on a budget and I have the Thermo C...

You can use B for mozz, higher moisture thermos, and swiss. Anything aged will need helveticus.

Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: Difference between thermo B and thermo C cultures
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2012, 11:18:29 AM »
you probably want a meso culture for soft cheeses, if I understand you right. You won't be working in high enough temperatures for the thermo cultures to be active.
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