Author Topic: Clean break but not fully coagulated  (Read 721 times)

Offline daithi23

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Clean break but not fully coagulated
« on: October 16, 2012, 06:16:55 PM »
Hi, I've managed to get a clean break but the deeper into the pot I go the more broken up the curds are until I get to the very bottom of the pot where they seem to gel again. Is this normal? Should I wait longer?


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Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: Clean break but not fully coagulated
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2012, 10:54:03 PM »
You did not stir the rennet in good enough, it is concentrated on the top.

You have to stir it very very well, a lot more so than you think that you should have to. And then do not disturb the cheese at all after it has been added.
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Offline daithi23

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Re: Clean break but not fully coagulated
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2012, 04:23:41 PM »
Thanks, should I always add the rennet to boiled cooled water before adding to the mix?

Offline bbracken677

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Re: Clean break but not fully coagulated
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2012, 06:00:26 PM »
I just use pure bottled water....as long as it isnt chlorinated or contaminated.

Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: Clean break but not fully coagulated
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2012, 07:21:45 PM »
bottled water can work, but you can also use spring water or distilled water available in gallon bottles at most grocery stores.

My great-grandmother always isnsted that you use only pure spring water or distilled water from the store to make sauerkraut, because it doesn't have anything in it that will interfere with the yeasts and bacteria that ferment the cabbage (sanitation is just as important for good sauerkraut as it is for cheese)

Boiling your water should work, IF the water hasn't gone through a softener (it will have salts in it) or IF it is not from a city system (it will have chlorine and maybe fluoride in it) If you live in the country, this means use your hard water line (your outdoor hose spickets should be hard water) If you live in the city, this means buy your water.

The same water guidelines apply for brining and washing (or they should, anyway)
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