Author Topic: SP's first Blue  (Read 1660 times)

Offline AndreasMergner

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Re: SP's first Blue
« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2012, 05:48:20 AM »
That is the beauty of having more than one small cheese as opposed to only one large cheese.  You can  try one and determine if the other one is ready.  Do they feel soft under the rind?  Seems like you had a lot  of PC so you may have some Brie type qualities to the cheese...?  Usually PC type cheeses don't require as much aging, but that is also due to the shape and the moisture in the paste.  Should be interesting to taste! 

Pretty amazing that you started with a Blue!  I have yet to make one myself, but it will probably be my next cheese.


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Offline SwiftPint

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Re: SP's first Blue
« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2012, 05:18:39 PM »
George,  are you saying they you'll cut a cheese in half and then wrap it in foil and fridge it,  or cut in half and then put back in the cave if its not ready yet. (when i say "ready" that subjective right, so I guess I mean "to your taste")

Im not really sure whats up with the PC.  I think that because I crumbled some Danish Blue in with my culture ( think danish blue has PR and PC?) Either that or its just some wild PC  :o 

Anreas,  its hard to know if they are soft under the rind.  I took a sample a few weeks back using some plastic tubing which I'd cut in half and sharpened (random improve cheese iron...)  and it was pretty soft and creamy,  not really a brie consistency, maybe just a softer creamier roquefort - over time would expect a cheese like this to become creamier or harder/drier?
It certainly doesnt feel soft under the rind when I press it, although the core sample would suggest it is....

I dont mind my cheeses to be strong / sharp,  so I guess no harm in leaving a bit longer.....  if I can wait any longer.  ;D

Pretty amazing that you started with a Blue!  I have yet to make one myself, but it will probably be my next cheese.
You know,  everything I read said to start with something really basic and work my way up.  But, well,  you know.....  the basic starter recipes always seemed to be for some random fresh curds thingy that didnt appeal, or for a cottage cheese etc.  So I just thought I'd go for it!  A blue seemed easier than something like a super mature cheddar (Montgomery's!)  or a 24month aged gruyere (Mmmmmmmm!!!),  plus I thought jumping in the deep end would be more fun!

I'd recommend making a blue if you like them.  It really didnt seem that hard.  I know mine isnt ready yet so dont know if its worked, but its seems to have turned out roughly as planned so far....

Thanks for the cheese info guys.  I'll definitely post pics when I take the plunge and cut them open!

Offline H-K-J

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Re: SP's first Blue
« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2012, 06:40:51 PM »
Blues to me were a little scary, at first, because of the molds :o
after the first one, it comes a little easier  ^-^
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Offline AndreasMergner

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Re: SP's first Blue
« Reply #18 on: November 21, 2012, 08:05:20 PM »
SP: Now that you ask, not sure if it will get drier or softer/creamier.  Some cheeses get drier as they age while others get softer.  The more water it loses, the drier it will get...but PC and B linens can make the paste softer (not sure about PR.) 

Just about ALL cheeses are scary when you first start making them!  I didn't know what was good or bad mold on my cheeses.  Blues seem to scare even some people that make other types of cheese though.  It does seem easy since the blue mold out competes just about anything.  There's no smearing or scraping to mess with.  Now I'm just in awe of these beautifully grotesque blue cheese pictures on this forum...and they apparently taste great!   I *have* to make one!   ;D

Offline george (MaryJ)

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Re: SP's first Blue
« Reply #19 on: November 22, 2012, 06:20:19 AM »
George,  are you saying they you'll cut a cheese in half and then wrap it in foil and fridge it,  or cut in half and then put back in the cave if its not ready yet. (when i say "ready" that subjective right, so I guess I mean "to your taste")
If it's ready, then I continue cutting it up and vac-seal the pieces (most of my cheeses are around 3 lbs, and once they're ready I cut 'em into quarters and individually vac-bag those).  If it's not ready, I re-package  the two pieces (however it's done based on the cheese type) and put them back in the cave.  It's my fudge in case I open one too early - a larger piece will age a little better than multiple small ones, I've read - but this also gives me a way to test the inside of the cheese and not just close to the rind.
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Offline SwiftPint

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Re: SP's first Blue
« Reply #20 on: November 23, 2012, 12:25:15 PM »
 :o

So,  I took the plunge and cut into one of them.  As follows:



It looks great,  not as much blue as I'd hoped,  but some, and a strong PR smell.  A bit gooeyer than I'd expected,  more Brie like.  I'm wondering whether I've ended up with something more like a Cambazola.

Anyway,  I tried a bit, and there was a massive PR hit,  not mega tangy, but overwhelming none the less.  Bit dominating it all was an exceedingly bitter ammonia flavour.  After the second nibble I couldnt have any more, it was just too unbearable.    >:(

I fudged the two halves back together, wrapped in aluminium foil and put it back in the cave. 
I think the ammonia & bitterness are linked, does this sound about right?
Is there any chance this will fade over time or is my cheese destined for the bin?
What can I do to avoid this happening to my next cheese?  Am I right in thinking that ammonia is probably due to too high RH and not enough air flow??

Sad times  :'(

Offline H-K-J

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Re: SP's first Blue
« Reply #21 on: November 23, 2012, 12:48:04 PM »
I have a question
Quote
10g Freeze dried cheese culture
What type?
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Offline SwiftPint

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Re: SP's first Blue
« Reply #22 on: November 23, 2012, 02:10:08 PM »
Hmmm,

It was this:

http://gnltd.co.uk/goat-nutrition/cheese-making-products/cheese-making-cultures/mesophilic-cheese-starter-culture-for-cheese-making.html

Which means I was wrong by saying 10g,  cos its a 6g packet. I suspect I meant 1g, which seems about right based on whats left in the packet.

I've realised that I've used a culture which isnt a DVI,  is that going to cause problems too?


* Note how I ignores the instructions that came with the sachet...   oops.


Offline Boofer

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Re: SP's first Blue
« Reply #23 on: November 23, 2012, 03:01:30 PM »
Is there any chance this will fade over time or is my cheese destined for the bin?
Sometimes it seems like the PR just gets carried away with itself, thinking "Ooooh, it's all about me!"

I found that to be true with my first Stilton style blues. I found that all blues don't have to be that way with my Fourme d'Ambert cheeses (and here). Way better. ;)

Sailor recommends a minimum 90 days for Stilton-style affinage. It's a personal thing, IMHO. Some folks feel that 45-60 days is just right. The longer the PR has to grow, the stronger it gets.

My own blues experience is limited, but I would recommend that you check the blues threads on the forum for more insight.

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