Author Topic: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5  (Read 2679 times)

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,194
  • Cheeses: 194
  • Contemplating cheese
Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« on: October 21, 2012, 09:47:44 PM »
Looking to craft an alpine cheese using Sailor's Beaufort recipe and the "Hard cheese with small eyes" recipe from my new book, Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking, I put this cheese together yesterday.

initial pH: 6.60

4 gallons Pride & Joy Dairy whole raw milk (cream level is marked on the milk jug)
8 cubes of Alp D mother culture, thawed
1/16 tsp Holdbac
1/16 tsp Renco dry calf rennet, dissolved in 1/4 c cool distilled water

Brought milk up to 90F.
7:30 Added thawed Alp D and Holdbac.
Looked for a .1 delta.
7:45 pH 6.50 - Added rennet.
8:05 Floc'd. Using a 2.5x multiplier and 20 minutes floc time, time to cut is 8:35.
Used whisk to cut to 1/4 inch. Rested 5 min.
Cut curds to 1/8 inch, rested 10 min.
Began raising temperature to 120F within 40-60 minutes, continued to stir gently.
End of cooking was at 45 minutes; pH 6.35.
Drained whey, saving 1/2 gallon for whey-brine and 1 gallon for pressing under whey.
Filled standard Tomme mould (7.375 inch) lined with plastic cheesecloth.
Placed filled mould inside pot with warm whey and that pot into double-boiler kettle with couple inches of warm water to maintain heat.
10:00 Began initial pressing to knit rind, using 5 lb weight and 2 pulleys, which delivers 1.9 psi. Pressed for 30 minutes.
10:30 Flipped, redressed, pressed as before. Good knit so far.
11:00 Flipped, redressed, drained whey, pressed as before.
12:00 PM Checked pH...5.60...looking for 5.3-5.4 to stop pressing.
2:45 pH 5.46 Flipped, rewrapped, removed plastic cheesecloth (some sticking)...going naked; pressing as before.
3:45 pH 5.45 Flipped, realigned nubbins in mould to try to push them back into the cheese. It did, but I got new ones! ::)
5:15 pH 5.40 Out of press, weighed
5:30 Into the brine for 4 hours.
9:30 Flipped in brine, continuing for 4 more hours.
1:30 AM Out of brine, dried, weighed, into minicave to airdry. Had to juggle cheese in cave to find a minicave and room on a cave rack.
10:00 Flipped, dried, returned to cave.

I intend to create a natural rind for this cheese and extend its affinage through 12 months or longer. I expect the nubbins to disappear over time.

-Boofer-
« Last Edit: October 22, 2012, 08:26:42 AM by Boofer »
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline bbracken677

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Dallas, Tx
  • Posts: 1,166
  • Cheeses: 16
  • I love me some cheese!
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2012, 05:32:57 AM »
Nice make and nice knit on the cheese! Hoping to have time wednesday for a make, probably cheddar.

Offline Tiarella

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Chester, MA, US
  • Posts: 1,623
  • Cheeses: 71
  • Default personal text
    • Farm Blog
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2012, 07:14:31 AM »
Nice looking cheese!  And I love seeing photos of the make.  How on earth did you get such a perfect alignment of old nubbins/new nubbins on the repress?  I like how the nubbins from the bottom holes didn't line up and created a kind of constellation effect on the top in one photo.  This looks like a great cheese and I hope you have lots of other cheeses to tempt you so you don't get tempted to taste this one early!  ^-^.

Are you happily stuck with your nose in Gianaclis' book?  When it arrived here I think I only came up for air for food and barn chores! 

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,194
  • Cheeses: 194
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2012, 08:37:14 AM »
How on earth did you get such a perfect alignment of old nubbins/new nubbins on the repress?  I like how the nubbins from the bottom holes didn't line up and created a kind of constellation effect on the top in one photo.
Thanks for your kind words.

Uh, the nubbins are misaligned. You can see the older ones as mere shadows of their former selves. The "constellation effect" you are referring to may just be loose nubbins in the whey-brine that happened to land on that surface.

I have to stop thinking I can avoid the nubbins and still get a clean knit without the cheesecloth. Stubborn.

Well, I've been trying to make a variety of other cheeses that are long, medium, and short-term affinage. So, yes, there are others in the Boofer cave network to keep me distracted.  ;)

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline Alpkäserei

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Indiana/Kanton Bern
  • Posts: 598
  • Cheeses: 62
  • Default personal text
    • https://www.facebook.com/Kaesereigrimwald
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2012, 11:28:07 AM »
Have you ever had the pleasure of using a slip form to make cheese? This is called in Swiss German a Järb. It is made traditionally of spruce but now often of plastic. It is a circular form with an adjustable diameter, the idea being to maintain a constant wheel height, as this is important for consistently aging cheese (not much moisture is lost through the 'Järbseit' or the side of the wheel that was in direct contact with the form during pressing). It is the best most reliable way to get consistent, smooth, perfectly formed wheels of cheese, which is important if you happen to be Swiss  ;)

I'd like to see some images some time of how firm you set your curd before cutting. I know the standard says until it makes a clean break and all that, but I have learned there is a big difference in some people's notions of the right time to cut.

The short setting times of a lot of these small cheeses scare me, because the early fermenting stage is really important to the texture of the later cheese. On the Alp, we always did 30 minutes settting. We used liquid rennet which was extremely precisely measured to the amount of milk and very very well mixed in.

All rambling aside, looks good so far, looking forward to seeing pictures of aging and washing and all such.

What kind of washing regiment are you going for, and what washing solution are you using?
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Tomer1

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Israel
  • Posts: 1,669
  • Cheeses: 33
  • Default personal text
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2012, 12:45:34 PM »
Do you press the whole time with the cheese sitting in the expelled whey?
 
Amatuar winemaker,baker, cook and musician
not in any particular order.

Offline mbox

  • Life is good - Cheese makes it better!
  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Thailand
  • Posts: 136
  • Cheeses: 5
    • >>>Heaven On Cheese<<<
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2012, 10:23:19 AM »
Awesome stuff Boofer, this cheese is now shortlisted on my "to do" list ..... i also appreciate the ph-levels you posted.
Having said that, i just got my ph meter back from repair which i barely used , my question is : are there certain "check-points" to check the ph-level and are there "standard ph-levels" that are to be achieved on these "check points"

Thanks , mbox

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,194
  • Cheeses: 194
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2012, 09:44:58 AM »
I'd like to see some images some time of how firm you set your curd before cutting. I know the standard says until it makes a clean break and all that, but I have learned there is a big difference in some people's notions of the right time to cut.

What kind of washing regiment are you going for, and what washing solution are you using?
I haven't used the form you mention, but I have seen it used online.

I don't follow the clean break idea. Not sure about a clean break "standard". I try to follow the pH markers for when to rennet, cook, drain & mould, press, and brine. The flocculation factor tells me when to cut.

You know, I would have just washed, as I have done in the past, with a 3% brine. But you have inspired me to dose that brine with a little white wine, so that's what I intend.  ;)

Do you press the whole time with the cheese sitting in the expelled whey?
You'll notice at 11:00 that I drain the whey, but then I still press in the pot to maintain warmth for the curds. I also wrap my double-boiler and pot arrangement with a clean towel to hold in the heat.

Awesome stuff Boofer, this cheese is now shortlisted on my "to do" list ..... i also appreciate the ph-levels you posted.
Having said that, i just got my ph meter back from repair which i barely used , my question is : are there certain "check-points" to check the ph-level and are there "standard ph-levels" that are to be achieved on these "check points"

Thanks , mbox
I mentioned a few pH points. You'll see them mentioned around the forum. They may vary slightly for the type of cheese you are making.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,194
  • Cheeses: 194
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2012, 09:22:41 AM »
When turning the cheese this morning I noticed the appearance of a smearing, much like a Geo mocasse or meat that has started to turn in the fridge.  :o

Prior to this, the surface was relatively dry with just a hint of moisture. The minicave lid has been cracked to allow some drying in the cave. I will commence the washing regimen tomorrow morning. I intend to use a 3% brine with distilled water and white wine. I'm not sure what proportion of water to wine I should use. I would have started with 50-50%. Anyone?

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline Alpkäserei

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Indiana/Kanton Bern
  • Posts: 598
  • Cheeses: 62
  • Default personal text
    • https://www.facebook.com/Kaesereigrimwald
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2012, 05:13:52 PM »
not important. Just make your brine as normal, and add wine to your little heart's desire. You don't need much, just a swig or two in the brine and a swig or two in you is fine.  :o

The more wine you have, the more wine flavor your rind will have. other than that, I'm not aware of any guidelines.

I never really measure anything out for my washing brine when I'm doing wine. I just put stuff in until it seems right, it's all relative anyway, and the water evaporates out once applied to the cheese just leaving the salt and dissolved solids of the wine behind. When using herbs, it's a different story. But even here, all I care about is making sure the herbs are in the proper proportions to each other.

Keep in mind that for the cheese I make, some people scrub it down with dry salt and other wash it with salt water. Clearly there is a difference in concentration here...
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,194
  • Cheeses: 194
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2012, 12:57:24 AM »
The color is deepening, becoming more golden. The suspected mocasse I mentioned earlier has morphed to Geo, although none was added to the milk or used in a wash. No doubt picked up from my cave environment.

I began washing today with a 5% brine. I will do that for a while and then add some white wine. I'm thinking Gewürztraminer.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,194
  • Cheeses: 194
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2012, 11:14:17 AM »
I've been washing this cheese with Vouvray wine and salt. The smear created gives the cheese a wonderful cheesy-fruity aroma. Occasionally, a little white growth appears which I assume to be Geo. You can see that on the first pic. The smear spreads it around.

For those followers of the Blue Glove, a special treat for you. ;)

-Boofer-


Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline JeffHamm

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
  • Posts: 2,646
  • Cheeses: 159
  • As goes the cheesemaker, so goes the cheese
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2012, 01:01:20 PM »
Nice boofer!  I think geo and b.linens are just everywhere.  A lot of my cheeses pick up geo and I've never bought any, and I've had b.linens show up before I ever bought any.  I think if the wild ones volunteer, they're telling you you've done it right and they're willing to move in without being planted there, so good job! 

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,194
  • Cheeses: 194
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2012, 04:41:44 PM »
Thanks, Jeff. I'm just about out of this bottle of Vouvray so I'll most likely stop washing and do an occasional soft brushing if needed. This needs at least 6 months or more affinage, but it feels really good so far.

All of my efforts with this style have taken different development routes. Very interesting. This particular version encourages me.

Seems like I have an affinity for washed rinds. There's just something magical.... :D

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,194
  • Cheeses: 194
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Alpine For You...Beaufort #5
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2012, 07:15:45 PM »
I've been watching this cheese and the flat surfaces have remained slightly sticky even though I stopped washing quite some time ago.

Today I decided I should remove the linens and slurry coating that have been part of the rind. Under cool running water I gently brushed the rind and then dried it. Now we'll see how the rind behaves.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.