Author Topic: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)  (Read 1602 times)

Offline Red

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my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« on: November 02, 2012, 01:28:10 AM »
Hi All,

I waxed my first gouda today, my second cheese ever, after a reasonable queso fresco many months back.  Again, thanks so much to everyone who posted their experiences, I tried to absorb it all....

I used the recipe from linuxboy's website, wacheese.com, but used 2 gallons(actually 8 litres, I'm in Canada). 

The recipe:
http://wacheese.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=81:gouda-washed-curd-howto&catid=43:moderate-cook-temp&Itemid=66

Measuring 2/3 of 1/8 of a teaspoon(my smallest measuring spoon) for the cultures was less than accurate....

I used 7 litres of organic, whole(3.25%) pasturized, non-homogonized milk and 1 litre of skim.  The recipe said whole milk was too much fat, but trying to calculate how much skim I needed to bring it down to a better percentage was beyond my ability to do in head while at the store...I just guessed 1 litre of skim would be ok.

I added 3/8 tsp CaCl2 to make up for the pasturization.  Not in recipe, but I think that's right...? 
Heated to 86deg
my cultures kind of clumped together, so they didn't sprinkle over the top as I've heard it described...
let them hydrate for 30 sec, stir
I let the milk ripen 45 min
I added 3/8 tsp of rennet in cold water - rennet was from glengarry cheese supply, bottle says 3/4 tsp for 13-15litres of milk

I thought that putting the pot in the sink with 86deg water surrounding would keep it from cooling too much, but at this point it had already cooled to 84deg.  I added some hot water to the sink, but didn't measure after that.  Better temp control next time...

floc time was around 8-9 min, cut at 27min  - too quick?  maybe too much ripening time?
cut and let heal 5 min

When I stirred I saw how terribly uneven my cutting was, lots of curds were way bigger than the rest.  I tried to break them up as much as possible.  I'll have to improve on my cutting...how?

stirred for 20min
washed the curds as directed

the temperature was now only 95deg, so I heated it on the stove.  I overshot a bit and hit 103deg instead of 100-102.

The recipe said stir for 15-20 min until " The curds should mat together, but not be too soft and still retain their individual shapes"  I was watching for this, but I don't really know what matting together looks like.  The curds were staying separate because I was stirring...
I drained after 22 minutes of stirring. 

I pressed under the whey and the cheese formed beautifully, except my follower, a lid from a stainless steel snack container, is a bit too small and not totally flat.  So one side of the cheese got quite a raised edge and was bumpy on top from the lid and from the cheesecloth.

I took the cheese out and flipped it, redressed it in the mold, and pressed in my off the wall type lever press.  Not sure about the weight, but my press is made of two 2 by 4s and is about 5 feet long. It's pretty heavy.  The fulcrum is about a foot and a half in.  I added a bottle of wine at the end for more weight, so a fair bit of pressure I'd guess.

Pressed overnight, about 9 hours.

Brined for 11 hours without flipping, as we were out for the day.  I sprinkled salt over the top that was out of the brine.  I made the brine with a gallon of whey and half of a 2.2 kg bag of pickling salt.  I think that should be just over 2 pounds of salt. 

I let it dry for 4 days, flipping whenever I thought of it, maybe 4-5 times a day. 

I just finished waxing it, and boy is that wax slippery to hold when you're re-dipping!

Into the cave (wine fridge) at 50deg....  I hope it works out despite my variances from the recipe!

It's been about a year now since my first thoughts of making cheese, and many hours lurking on this forum made it a reality.  I've got quite a ways to go in technique and equipment, but it really seems doable to make my own cheese.  But I'm still nervous this gouda won't work out....I think I can last until Christmas to try it....




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Offline bbracken677

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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2012, 05:30:41 AM »
Hi All,


I added 3/8 tsp CaCl2 to make up for the pasturization.  Not in recipe, but I think that's right...? 


That is quite right...I also add 3/8 tsp to a 2 gallon make when using pasteurized.



I added 3/8 tsp of rennet in cold water - rennet was from glengarry cheese supply, bottle says 3/4 tsp for 13-15litres of milk
floc time was around 8-9 min, cut at 27min  - too quick?  maybe too much ripening time?


Your floc time of 8-9 mins is a bit low (target 15 mins) so you should adjust rennet amount for that. Next time try 1/4 tsp rennet and see how that works.


I thought that putting the pot in the sink with 86deg water surrounding would keep it from cooling too much, but at this point it had already cooled to 84deg.  I added some hot water to the sink, but didn't measure after that.  Better temp control next time...


Probably not a problem..if you are going to err, a couple of degrees under isn't a problem. A good measure for how well your culture is working would be a pH meter...if you begin to make cheese regularly, would be a good investment.


When I stirred I saw how terribly uneven my cutting was, lots of curds were way bigger than the rest.  I tried to break them up as much as possible.  I'll have to improve on my cutting...how?


haha! Same here...the home cheese-maker really doesn't have the tools to properly cut small makes, so all you can do is the best you can do. If you get the right dimensions with your first couple of series of cuts, you just deal with the depth cuts as you stir.


the temperature was now only 95deg, so I heated it on the stove.  I overshot a bit and hit 103deg instead of 100-102.


Not a problem, and for this being your 2nd cheese, really quite well done!


The recipe said stir for 15-20 min until " The curds should mat together, but not be too soft and still retain their individual shapes"  I was watching for this, but I don't really know what matting together looks like.  The curds were staying separate because I was stirring...
I drained after 22 minutes of stirring.


This is one of the places you pH meter would come in handy, giving you an exact measurement of your progress...When curds start to mat together you will begin to see "clumps" of curds as you stir. In other words, they will try to stick together as though they have become tacky.


Brined for 11 hours without flipping, as we were out for the day.  I sprinkled salt over the top that was out of the brine.  I made the brine with a gallon of whey and half of a 2.2 kg bag of pickling salt.  I think that should be just over 2 pounds of salt.


Your cheese may be a bit salty, but probably not too bad at all. General rule of thumb I have gleaned from the forums is when brining a cheese, four hours per pound of cheese. 
 

Into the cave (wine fridge) at 50deg....  I hope it works out despite my variances from the recipe!


I think your make went pretty well, specially for your 2nd cheese! A cheese for you!


It's been about a year now since my first thoughts of making cheese, and many hours lurking on this forum made it a reality.  I've got quite a ways to go in technique and equipment, but it really seems doable to make my own cheese.  But I'm still nervous this gouda won't work out....I think I can last until Christmas to try it....


Good luck with your cheese endeavors!  Sounds like this first make went pretty well.  :)


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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2012, 09:39:20 AM »
Looks like a fine make. It's hard to be super consistent when just starting out. I would take careful notes, and taste later to see the outcome, and keep making cheese :)
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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2012, 10:37:56 PM »
I pressed under the whey and the cheese formed beautifully, except my follower, a lid from a stainless steel snack container, is a bit too small and not totally flat.  So one side of the cheese got quite a raised edge and was bumpy on top from the lid and from the cheesecloth.

Hey! My first pressed cheese was done using a flat lid or something like that (actually, I think I used a can of crushed tomatoes). That was one funky looking cheese. As I recall, it turned out pretty good though!

 O0
// bad cheese exception handling
try { Cheese myCheese = new Gouda(); } catch (NastyCheeseException e) { throw new CultureContaminationException(); }

Offline bbracken677

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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2012, 08:18:54 AM »
Cheese is one case where the ends do really justify the means   :)

As long as it gets the job done!


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Offline Boofer

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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2012, 09:11:44 AM »

When I stirred I saw how terribly uneven my cutting was, lots of curds were way bigger than the rest.  I tried to break them up as much as possible.  I'll have to improve on my cutting...how?


haha! Same here...the home cheese-maker really doesn't have the tools to properly cut small makes, so all you can do is the best you can do. If you get the right dimensions with your first couple of series of cuts, you just deal with the depth cuts as you stir.

What I found helpful is to make my initial cuts with a long knife, rest the curds, then cut smaller with a long whisk.

When making my press, I validated the pressing weight by using a bathroom scale. I needed to use a spreader under the piston/pushrod so that I didn't punch a hole in my scale. It allowed me to accurately see that I could deliver in excess of 350 lbs (158kg). It's important to have a good idea how much pressing power your cheese is receiving. Some need very little, some need to "stress the press".  ;)

Nice detailed make.

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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2012, 09:46:24 AM »
A lot of big producers use an orbital cutting knife especially designed to cut the curd evenly. When making a sweated curd (i.e. cooked) then evenness is important to good texture.

When cutting by hand with a harp or whisk, it is all about technique. You are not going to get even curd if you just beat the whisk around randomly or stir it in circles. You need to experiment a little bit to find out just what technique works best in your vat, but my suggestion would be to stir in an 8 pattern. Also, don't stir too fast. The stirring with the whisk to cut the curds needs to be slow and deliberate. This is really one of the hardest parts of hand-cheesemaking to get down pat.
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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2012, 09:50:38 AM »
The way you test your curd for good matting and proper texture is to stick your hand down in and grab a handful of curd. Squeeze it together lightly, and if it doesn't stick then it needs to go a bit longer. Rub your thumb across the curd and you will have a good idea of how sticky it is.
Gut gibt's der schwiizer Chäser

Offline Red

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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2012, 10:39:29 PM »
The way you test your curd for good matting and proper texture is to stick your hand down in and grab a handful of curd. Squeeze it together lightly, and if it doesn't stick then it needs to go a bit longer. Rub your thumb across the curd and you will have a good idea of how sticky it is.

Thanks!  that's just what I needed to know...

A lot of big producers use an orbital cutting knife especially designed to cut the curd evenly. When making a sweated curd (i.e. cooked) then evenness is important to good texture.

When cutting by hand with a harp or whisk, it is all about technique. You are not going to get even curd if you just beat the whisk around randomly or stir it in circles. You need to experiment a little bit to find out just what technique works best in your vat, but my suggestion would be to stir in an 8 pattern. Also, don't stir too fast. The stirring with the whisk to cut the curds needs to be slow and deliberate. This is really one of the hardest parts of hand-cheesemaking to get down pat.


does anyone have a link to video of this whisking technique?  I've only seen using a knife...

Offline Red

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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2012, 10:48:12 PM »
Thanks bbracken for the detailed reply.  That really helps a new cheesemaker   :)

And thanks linuxboy for the detailed recipe.  I'm in Vancouver BC, so maybe I'll get down your way someday to taste the local cheeses.

I'll be incorporating pH as soon as I can get a meter.  I'm looking for a supplier of the extech p100 or similar here in Canada, but no luck yet.  Amazon.com won't ship to me, and Amazon.ca only has ones at around 35$ which I assume aren't worth the bother...  the really high end ones are just out of my budget.

Next cheese in a few weeks I hope!

Red


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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2012, 03:29:34 PM »
I could give you a video that shows the use of a harp with such a technique. You would just use the whisk the same.

But really it is not too difficult. Just cut the curd first with a knife as best as you can, then stir slowly with a whisk -a big whisk, with as much space between the wires as you can find. Or even better, a harp.

Stir in an 8 shaped pattern
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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2012, 08:54:53 PM »
I'll be incorporating pH as soon as I can get a meter.  I'm looking for a supplier of the extech p100 or similar here in Canada, but no luck yet.  Amazon.com won't ship to me, and Amazon.ca only has ones at around 35$ which I assume aren't worth the bother...


Check here: http://www.extech.com/instruments/distributors.asp?loc=int&cid=37

BTW, I have an Extech PH110. I like it. Just make sure you get some good calibration fluid.
// bad cheese exception handling
try { Cheese myCheese = new Gouda(); } catch (NastyCheeseException e) { throw new CultureContaminationException(); }

Offline bbracken677

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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2012, 07:18:26 AM »
I am in need of a better pH meter and this is the one on my radar currently: http://www.amazon.com/American-Marine-Pinpoint-Monitor-Package/dp/B001EHAZ30/ref=zg_bs_393271011_33

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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #13 on: November 05, 2012, 01:37:49 PM »
I am in need of a better pH meter and this is the one on my radar currently: http://www.amazon.com/American-Marine-Pinpoint-Monitor-Package/dp/B001EHAZ30/ref=zg_bs_393271011_33


Hmmmm... that's an interesting idea. Never thought of using an actual pH monitor in cheese before. I wonder if it is food safe. I'm tempted to get one of those for my aquarium. Bookmarked for later!
// bad cheese exception handling
try { Cheese myCheese = new Gouda(); } catch (NastyCheeseException e) { throw new CultureContaminationException(); }

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Re: my first gouda(used recipe from wacheese.com)
« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2012, 01:41:12 PM »
That probe is not what you need for taking flat measurements - curd, finished cheese, etc.
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