Author Topic: What is this for?  (Read 1515 times)

Offline rosawoodsii

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What is this for?
« on: November 09, 2012, 11:31:01 AM »
I was looking through my cheese cultures and came across a packet of Corynebacteria.  Then I did a search through all my cheese recipes and found absolutely nothing that calls for it.  I can't imagine why I bought it.  Can anyone enlighten me which cheeses I would use it for?
Joy


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Offline bbracken677

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2012, 11:44:43 AM »
I believe that is commonly referred to as b. linens. Lots of references to it in the forums.

Offline H-K-J

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2012, 12:13:12 PM »
From wikki
Quote
Industrial uses

Nonpathogenic species of Corynebacterium are used for very important industrial applications, such as the production of amino acids,[19][20] nucleotides, and other nutritional factors (Martín, 1989); bioconversion of steroids;[21] degradation of hydrocarbons;[22] cheese aging;[23] and production of enzymes (Khurana et al., 2000). Some species produce metabolites similar to antibiotics: bacteriocins of the corynecin-linocin type,[15][24][25] antitumor agents,[26] etc. One of the most studied species is C. glutamicum, whose name refers to its capacity to produce glutamic acid in aerobic conditions.[27] It is used in the foods industry as monosodium glutamate (MSG) in the production of soy sauce and yogurt.
Species of Corynebacterium have been used in the mass production of various amino acids including glutamic acid, a food additive that is made at a rate of 1.5 million tons/ year. The metabolic pathways of Corynebacterium have been further manipulated to produce lysine and threonine.
Expression of functionally active human epidermal growth factor has been brought about in C. glutamicum,[28] thus demonstrating a potential for industrial-scale production of human proteins. Expressed proteins can be targeted for secretion through either the general secretory pathway (Sec) or the twin-arginine translocation pathway (Tat).[29]
Unlike Gram-negative bacteria, the Gram-positive Corynebacterium species lack lipopolysaccharides that function as antigenic endotoxins in humans.
I think I'm gettin another brain crap :o
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Offline mightyMouse.tar.gz

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2012, 03:14:48 PM »
I was looking through my cheese cultures and came across a packet of Corynebacteria.  Then I did a search through all my cheese recipes and found absolutely nothing that calls for it.  I can't imagine why I bought it.  Can anyone enlighten me which cheeses I would use it for?

Yes, I think that might be a French name for Brevibacterium linens as Doghead Dude (bbracken677) said. Not sure if you meant you are not familiar with B. linens or just that name but in case you are not familiar with B. linens, it is used in washed rind cheeses like limburger and morbier and muenster. Its what gives those cheeses a redish rind. Incidentally, it's the same species of bacteria that makes your feet smell. Cool huh? (mmmmm... toe jam cheese.... yummy!!).
// bad cheese exception handling
try { Cheese myCheese = new Gouda(); } catch (NastyCheeseException e) { throw new CultureContaminationException(); }

Offline rosawoodsii

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2012, 06:08:29 PM »
Incidentally, it's the same species of bacteria that makes your feet smell. Cool huh? (mmmmm... toe jam cheese.... yummy!!).

Oh,yech!  Thanks a lot!  I'll never look at red rinds the same way again.  :-X

Yes, it was just the name that I wasn't familiar with.
Joy


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Offline mightyMouse.tar.gz

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2012, 02:13:16 AM »

Oh,yech!  Thanks a lot!  I'll never look at red rinds the same way again.  :-X

Yes, it was just the name that I wasn't familiar with.

Hey, still tastes good though, right?
// bad cheese exception handling
try { Cheese myCheese = new Gouda(); } catch (NastyCheeseException e) { throw new CultureContaminationException(); }

Offline bbracken677

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2012, 08:20:41 AM »

 as Doghead Dude (bbracken677) said.


LOL  My strange humor shows...I found the pic to be hilarious...a dog, dressed in a suit and tie, playing chess.   :)   

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Offline rosawoodsii

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2012, 08:33:20 AM »
Oh, no!  I just realized now that it IS a dog... (I thought it was a strange looking porker...)  I really need to wear my glasses more often.   ::)
Joy

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2012, 10:12:57 AM »
my son has the stinkiest feet on earth!  no kidding.  maybe I can just soak his feet and use the water in my cheese. :D ???
BAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA... sorry .. couldnt resisit..
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2012, 07:38:25 PM »
my son has the stinkiest feet on earth!  no kidding.  maybe I can just soak his feet and use the water in my cheese. :D ???
BAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA... sorry .. couldnt resisit..

Just soak his feet, add salt (2.5% by weight) and then use it as a rind wash!!   

umm...NO!  lol


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Offline Tiffany

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2012, 08:23:02 PM »
Well seriously, have to wonder where they come up with some of this stuff.  If they use the gland under the tounge powdered for lipase, and stomach lining for rennet, what else are they using.  Who first decided, hey let's take this glandy thing under this goats tounge, dry it in the sun, powder it and throw it in some milk and see what happens... Ya know what I mean...
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2012, 09:01:56 AM »
Same with foods...certain items just dont (in my mind) lend themselves to being viewed as normal food...so who was the first person to go, "Hey! I am going to try to eat this...)

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2012, 10:50:12 PM »
Same with foods...certain items just dont (in my mind) lend themselves to being viewed as normal food...so who was the first person to go, "Hey! I am going to try to eat this...)

Great example: Cows' milk. "Hey, you know what! I have an idea! Remember how when we were babies and when we got hungry and cried our mothers.... well, lets try doing that to that cow over there!"

Don't even get me started on Rocky Mountain Oysters. What kinda sick mo fo decided that was a good idea? Of course as strange as it is to think about the first person to try Rocky Mountain Oysters, that weirdness is quickly eclipsed by the fact that people STILL eat them.... BLAH!

The examples are endless!
// bad cheese exception handling
try { Cheese myCheese = new Gouda(); } catch (NastyCheeseException e) { throw new CultureContaminationException(); }

Offline rosawoodsii

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2012, 06:27:16 AM »
Same with foods...certain items just dont (in my mind) lend themselves to being viewed as normal food...so who was the first person to go, "Hey! I am going to try to eat this...)

Great example: Cows' milk. "Hey, you know what! I have an idea! Remember how when we were babies and when we got hungry and cried our mothers.... well, lets try doing that to that cow over there!"

Don't even get me started on Rocky Mountain Oysters. What kinda sick mo fo decided that was a good idea? Of course as strange as it is to think about the first person to try Rocky Mountain Oysters, that weirdness is quickly eclipsed by the fact that people STILL eat them.... BLAH!

I rather think the milk usage was started when a mother died or whatever and couldn't feed her child.  In order to keep the baby alive, members of the tribe/community/family group/whatever were forced to find a way to get milk for that child.

So far as Rocky Mountain Oysters, brains, tripe, and other organ meats, nothing sick about it.  My grandfather used to use "everything but the squeal" on animals he raised for meat.  To do less is to waste a portion of that animal whose life was taken.  I'm sure that practice started back in the days of hunter/gatherers, when people didn't turn up their nose at such things.  If being "civilized" means being wasteful and taking life thoughtlessly, then that's sicker, IMO, then using the whole animal.

I think the difference in attitudes is between city people and farm types.
Joy

Offline Tiffany

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Re: What is this for?
« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2012, 06:48:17 AM »
I agree Joy
Living in the country we use allot of the animals we butcher or hunt.  NOT as much as cultures have used in the past, but allot more than most.  What isn't used by US, is recycled to out pigs, chickens or dogs. Proving them with a natural and healthy diet.  We have wonderful free range eggs, juicy fresh pork, and out dogs are healthy, and able to run down squirrels and rabbits.  Not being over loaded with carb foods.  If it cannot be fed, it is composted and eventually fed to the garden OR incinerated and the ash is used on the garden as well.  We have become a society of waste.  Having too much food that we feel tossing it in the trash is ok.  We are hunter gathers here, hunting nearly every season, cept rabbit.  Rabbit meat has no nutritional value eaten so we don't waste the life.  I hunt plants and wild mushrooms in the forests. Canning, freezing and drying my finds.  Apx 10 years ago we both worked more than full time and made apx 85,000 a year.  We both lost jobs, me first and 4 years later my husband.  We not make $12,000 a year. But we have 5 freezers full of meat, veggies and other things and I don't even wish to count jars.  We teach people how to become self sufficient.   Cheese making was a natural addition to our way of living.  With that said... I'm late to get off my duff and milk.  I'm gonna have 4 gals wondering where the hell the milk maid is at. 
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