Author Topic: Brine Specific Gravity  (Read 5417 times)

Offline Wayne Harris

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Brine Specific Gravity
« on: February 14, 2009, 07:29:33 PM »
Does anyone measure the Specific Gravity of their brine?

I am making up a heavy brine for my parm and wonder what SG the rest of you pros use?

My SG is currently at 1.134.
The Beverage Peoples brine page states SG 1.148-1.169 for a heavy brine.

What are the recommendations for parm?

Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas


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Offline Wayne Harris

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Re: Brine Specific Gravity
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2009, 02:54:13 PM »
I settled on a brine SG 1.148

I also added sufficient citric acid to drop the pH to 4.73

So far, so good.  My 6 gal parm is floating fine.  I've pulled it out a couple of times and the parm has firmed up nicely. The edges are getting a rind already. 
Its not rock hard, but has a good solid density and at the edges are starting to get a bit hard.

I will soak these wheels for 30 hours.
Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Brine Specific Gravity
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2009, 04:52:57 PM »
Sounds goog Wayne, I would measure if I was maknig a brine other than saturated. I usually add like 3 cups of salt per gallon or something like that. As long as salt is at the bottom over night I'm good. I did try once to measure but I must have had too much salt as it went off the scale of the hydrometer. I don't lower my PH but my brine after 1 weeks with parm in it is crystal clear, I wonder if I should?
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Offline Captain Caprine

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Re: Brine Specific Gravity
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2009, 10:04:21 PM »
Wayne,
I do the same as Carter but for the anal retentive cheese maker I supply the following...

1 U.S. gallon of saturated brine contains 2.6 lbs. sodium chtoride

1 ft3 (7.481 U.S. gailons) of saturated brine contains 19.4 lbs. of sodium chloride

1 pound of sodium chloride (NaCl) contains 5,994 grains of sodium expressed as CaC03

Completely saturated brine is a 26.4% solution of NaCI with a specific gravity of 1.20 at 20°C

(NOTE: At 25°C,35.9 grams of NaCl will dissolve in 100 grams of H2O; therefore, 35.9g/135.99 = 26.4% solution of NaCl)

CC


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Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Brine Specific Gravity
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2009, 10:41:51 PM »
Captain I didn't realize you spoke a foreign language. ;D
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Offline Captain Caprine

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Re: Brine Specific Gravity
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2009, 10:50:34 PM »
That is my native tounge :D
Just once...
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Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Brine Specific Gravity
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2009, 03:56:48 AM »
I always wanted to be fluent in Klingon, but apparantly Rosetta Stone doesn't offer that course yet.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.