Author Topic: Roqueforti culture differnces  (Read 1536 times)

Offline Beans

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Roqueforti culture differnces
« on: November 15, 2012, 04:43:51 PM »
My best cheeses to date are definitely the Blues.  I recently used up the last of my culture and when I went to purchase a new package I noticed there were several different types/strains of P. Roquefortii ie PA, PV, and PS.  Does anyone know the difference?  I sent an email to Choozit but have not received a response yet.


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Offline Tomer1

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2012, 05:37:41 PM »
They differ by color (blue or green veins) protolysis and lypolysis strength. (mild, strong) and speed.

Culture Growth rate Flavour Colour Comments
CHOOZIT™ Medium fast Strong blue taste Blue-green Soft, more fatty cheese, creamy
P. roqueforti CB2 consistency, long shelf life. For soft
higher fat level cheese, e.g. mild
Gorgonzola, Edelpilz and Blue soft
double mould-type cheese
CHOOZIT™ Very fast Mild blue taste Dark-green Mild cheese, can be mixed with PV, long
P. roqueforti PA shelf life, e.g. danish blue and double
mould-type cheese
CHOOZIT™ Fast Typical blue taste Middle-green Can be mixed with PV, no unbound
P. roqueforti PJ moisture, long shelf life, e.g. Edelpilz or
Roquefort
CHOOZIT™ Very fast Strong blue taste Bluish-green Very creamy consistency, e.g. Edelpilz,
P. roqueforti PV Roquefort and strong Gorgonzola-type
CHOOZIT™ Very fast Mild blue taste Middle-green Creamy consistency, no unbound
P. roqueforti WI moisture, long shelf life,
e.g. Edelpilz, danish blue or
Roquefort-type cheese
CHOOZIT™ Medium fast Mild blue taste Blue-green Mould-type cheese, can be put in
P. roqueforti PS association with P. candidum PC 54/HP6

http://www.orchard-dairy.co.uk/downloads%5CChoozitRipening&MouldCultures_20022009102952.pdf
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Offline Beans

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2012, 06:29:09 PM »
Perfect Tomer1, Thanks

Offline botanist

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2012, 05:25:18 PM »
Thanks Tomer,

I notice several of the PR's as contributing a creamy consistency.  Any provide a drier consistency (or at least less creamy?)
before goats, store bought milk = chevre & feta, with goats, infinite possibilities, goatie love, lotta work cleaning out the barn!

Offline Tomer1

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2012, 08:17:13 AM »
I think the make will contribute much more to the texture then the yeast.  Make drier curd (heat curd longer\cut smaller\decrease fluc factor)
I assume you want a blue cheese which is easier to crumble into a salad?
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Offline botanist

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2012, 07:18:14 PM »
Yes, Tomer, exactly that.  We like to crumble in my feta, but the blues I've made so far (gouda, a 'Eureka' one that ended up with bloomy rind molds unintentionally) have been less crumbly than firm to creamy.  Gorgonzola dolce is an example of what I don't want, while the crumbly Gorgonzola is great.  I know I can affect the texture by the degree of cooking, draining, pressing, but I thought that proteolysis and lipolysis would also make a significant difference, culture dependent.

thanks for any insights you can provide.  I have a very young Bleu du Queryas, too young to say yet on that one.
before goats, store bought milk = chevre & feta, with goats, infinite possibilities, goatie love, lotta work cleaning out the barn!

Offline T-Bird

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2012, 08:17:51 PM »
Steal the blue veins from a cheese you like. Suspend them in 1/4 cup water (you need about 1/4 tsp of the veins) add it when you would add the mold culture for your recipe. That's what I do never had it fail. I have done this 5-6 times with the same results. Saves having to figure out proteolysis ,lipolytic characteristics etc. If you liked the cheese , it's what you're looking for.
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Offline botanist

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2012, 11:07:41 PM »
Steal the blue veins from a cheese you like. Suspend them in 1/4 cup water (you need about 1/4 tsp of the veins) add it when you would add the mold culture for your recipe. That's what I do never had it fail. I have done this 5-6 times with the same results. Saves having to figure out proteolysis ,lipolytic characteristics etc. If you liked the cheese , it's what you're looking for.

Thanks, Tbird.  I tried that with cambozola, along with the recommended commercial cultures, but never got the PR to last to maturity.  It seemed that the PC simply took over, although in the early stages it smelled right and the PR started to grow.  When I get around to trying to make Gorgonzola, I will definitely incorporate one I like.
before goats, store bought milk = chevre & feta, with goats, infinite possibilities, goatie love, lotta work cleaning out the barn!

Offline T-Bird

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2012, 09:12:30 AM »
So far (and I have one going now so it probably will fail) every time I've used only the PR from an established commercial cheese, I have had no trouble getting it to grow -see some of my posts from last spring. I will say that the cheese sourced molds that I have used don't seem to be as aggressive as the dehydrated PR that I was buying at 1st. That's ok since I make 2# cheeese.
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Offline botanist

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2012, 01:21:31 PM »
Well, T-Bird, that 'Spring Stilton' sure looked like the real deal, so it is working for you to use the PR from the commercial cheese, and I've used previous make slurries myself.  The problem I had was with the PC + PR combination (Cambozola).  The PC just seemed more aggressive than the PR and out-competed it.
before goats, store bought milk = chevre & feta, with goats, infinite possibilities, goatie love, lotta work cleaning out the barn!


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Offline T-Bird

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2012, 02:18:03 PM »
Never tried to combine with another culture. I've soticed some differences in aggressiveness of various PR strains from different cheeses. The one I'm using now seems to be the slowest growing of all. My prob is that around here, the stores rarely have Stilton at all so choosing the same brand for every make hasn't been possible.
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Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2012, 04:10:06 PM »
I don't know which strain they actually use in Stiltons but considering they age them 10 to 11 weeks before sale I would assume it's one of the fast ones.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2012, 04:17:04 PM by Al Lewis »

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2012, 02:41:38 PM »
PC will always outgrow blue.  When white covered blues are made you actually grow the blue first, then spray the white spores on.

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2012, 02:47:27 PM »
PC will always outgrow blue.  When white covered blues are made you actually grow the blue first, then spray the white spores on.
Thanks for that, Francois!  It confirms what I'd observed and now I know what to do about it, although the recipes I've found for cambozola don't seem to go that way.
before goats, store bought milk = chevre & feta, with goats, infinite possibilities, goatie love, lotta work cleaning out the barn!

Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Roqueforti culture differnces
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2012, 06:21:04 PM »
The blue showed up on my cambozola way before the PC.  Still waiting for the outside to get fully covered.  Have one or two spots of blue on the top but quite a few more on the sides.  Been spraying away!! LOL