Author Topic: I think I might have just found the key to large nice eyes in a swiss cheese  (Read 2945 times)

Offline Likesspace

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Gurkan, You are very welcome.
Since making my last post on this topic I have decided to do some more studying before attempting another swiss style cheese.
I would hate to guess how much I've spent on propionic shermanii over the past few years, but there's no doubt it is way too much since I have not turned out one single quality example.
One thing that I have read is that another key to forming the large eyes is to keep the gas production at a slow pace which means not using too much culture at the beginning and not ripening at too high of a temp.
On my last several makes I have used up to a tsp. of shermanii per 5 gallon batch when I probably should have used 3/8 of a tsp at most. I really just figured that if a little worked okay then a lot should work even better.
On my next attempt I plan on using 3/8 tsp and sweating at not over 68 degrees F. I will also, of course, press under the whey.
Another thing that I've read (on the university of guelph website) is that bagging with plenty of room for expansion will also help in the development of eyes. This is something that was discussed slightly a couple of weeks ago on this forum.
According to the UofGuelph website, vacuum bagging with a LOT of room for expansion is an acceptable practice so I also plan on giving this a try in the future.
I've learned that best practice is to only change one variable at a time to figure out what works and what doesn't. On my next batch I plan on trying the reduced amount of shermanii and sweating at a cooler temp. If that gives better results then the vacuum bagging will be the next thing that I try.
I'm still feeling intimidated by this type of cheese but once it gets a little cooler here it's on my list. I really can't wait until one of us get this right and figure out the proper procedure(s).

Dave


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Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

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I want to try again for the fourth time on this type of cheese this weekend. On another thread about the P. Shermanii bacteria; it has been said that it is coming from the red clover and a brewed tea with it may be used (without killing the bacteria with high temperatures). This has never been tried by the members here but you may want to give it a go to cut down your expenses on the cultures  ;)

Offline Likesspace

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Gurkan....
Although I live in a rural area and although red clover is plentiful during the summer months, I'm not the one to give this a try. I need everything working in my favor when it comes to this variety of cheese.
Swiss has been my nemesis for far too long but one of these days I will beat it. If others can make one with nice large eyes then there is no reason that I can't do the same.....
Well, other than my lack of skill and knowledge.  ;D

Dave