Author Topic: Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?  (Read 771 times)

Offline Boofer

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Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?
« on: November 19, 2012, 12:06:39 AM »
I've just made a Horseradish Cheddar in the past couple days. It is drying at room temperature and looks like it might possibly be heading towards a cracked rind. I want to preserve the rind and have vacuum-sealed Cheddars in the past. This time, I was wondering how effectively my cream coating would work to preserve the moisture content, protect the rind from molds (it has natamycin), and still permit the cheese to age better than vacuum-sealing.

I do realize there have been discussions on the permeability of the dried cream coating and subsequent small loss of moisture.

No, I don't want to bandage this cheese. ;)

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Offline Tiarella

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Re: Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2012, 06:19:50 AM »
Hope you get a lot of replies because I've wondered this also.......

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2012, 08:23:15 AM »
Do you want to know rate of moisture loss, Boofer, or just some anecdotal guidance?

Rate of loss depends on form factor, room RH and how heavy a coat you put on. Generally, if you're not able to go 90-92% RH and are stuck in the 80s RH, a moderate paracoat applied with a brush will slow down moisture loss by 40-50%. It is still rather permeable. A thicker coat will help more.
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2012, 10:28:40 AM »
I guess I just wanted reassurance that, for this cheese style, putting a cream coating on would be okay. Or would I just be better off vacuum-sealing as I've done in the past?

I made this on Saturday and it already looks pretty dry. Not sure whether the addition of the horseradish is affecting the moisture content and texture. The individual curds seem accentuated and highlighted. The cheese is in its minicave with the lid slightly cracked. Maybe too low RH? Ambient room temp outside minicave is around 65-70F.

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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2012, 10:39:24 AM »
depends on your culture blend for this and when you want to eat it. IMHO both are acceptable approaches in general for a cheddar. I would paint it and then if it's still not enough protection, vac seal after a few months.
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2012, 10:42:51 AM »
Thanks, Pav. We're on the same wavelength.

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Offline Mike Richards

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Re: Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2013, 10:11:28 PM »
Boofer--What did you end up doing with this and how did it turn out?  I'm going to be gone for a number of months and am trying to figure out what to do with my big cheeses while I'm gone.  My wife is willing to take care of them, but if I can get them to where all she has to do is flip them every once in a while, that would be best.  I'm thinking of doing cream coat--they're too big for my ability to bag and I'm not great at waxing.  I can maintain the humidity in the cave, but it takes some effort and is not something I'll ask my wife to try to do.
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2013, 09:02:21 PM »
I'd opt for the cream-coating. Does a great job (that I've seen) and then can be vacuum-sealed for greater moisture protection/retention.

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Offline High Altitude

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Re: Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2013, 10:14:58 PM »
Since you cannot vacuum seal, make it 3 coats of the cream coating (let dry in between).  That should work fine.  And, Mike, you should REALLY try waxing...so simple and easy...you'll probably really enjoy it even  ;D!

Have fun on your trip, where ever you're going. And watch, you'll find your wife making cheese herself by the time you get back  ;).
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Offline Mike Richards

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Re: Cheddar - Cream Coating Surface?
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2013, 11:36:26 PM »
I'm leaning towards a few coats of the cream coat and then painting wax on.  I used to wax all my cheeses--they were smaller and I could dip them.  It worked fine, but would bleed the color onto my cheeses and I couldn't see when moisture would collect or if pin holes allowed mold to grow.  I have since learned to let the cheeses dry more, but also started bagging, which has been, up until now, a much better option.  Since these guys are so big, I can't bag them, so cream coat and then a coating of wax, too, seems like a good solution.
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