Author Topic: Grainy ricotta  (Read 714 times)

Offline rosawoodsii

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Grainy ricotta
« on: November 20, 2012, 11:34:50 AM »
The last few batches of ricotta I've made have been very grainy,  Normally I let the whey sit for a day or two to acidify, but even when I'm testing for pH before I heat the whey, it doesn't seem to want to separate very easily.  I've found that I end up having to use vinegar instead of it just separating once it gets to about 190°.  Could this be because it's late lactation milk, or is there another explanation?
Joy


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Offline bodul

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Re: Grainy ricotta
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2012, 12:05:10 PM »
The last few batches of ricotta I've made have been very grainy,  Normally I let the whey sit for a day or two to acidify, but even when I'm testing for pH before I heat the whey, it doesn't seem to want to separate very easily.  I've found that I end up having to use vinegar instead of it just separating once it gets to about 190°.  Could this be because it's late lactation milk, or is there another explanation?
I wish I can help you..because I have same problem  anybody help ?

Did you filtered a whey?

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Grainy ricotta
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2012, 01:18:11 PM »
IMHO you should process your whey for Ricotta immediately and not let it sit for a day or two. You may or may not have to use vinegar depending on the acidity of the whey. For example, whey from Mozzarella (quicky or traditional) is already acidic enough. Whey from a Colby is going to be over 6.0 so that would have to be acidified.

"Real" Ricotta is traditionally made from Mozzarella whey, so there would be very little or no need for additional acidity.
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Offline Schnecken Slayer

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Re: Grainy ricotta
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2012, 02:41:41 AM »
IMHO you should process your whey for Ricotta immediately and not let it sit for a day or two. You may or may not have to use vinegar depending on the acidity of the whey. For example, whey from Mozzarella (quicky or traditional) is already acidic enough. Whey from a Colby is going to be over 6.0 so that would have to be acidified.

"Real" Ricotta is traditionally made from Mozzarella whey, so there would be very little or no need for additional acidity.

That explains a lot, yet so simple.
Thanks for the insight.

Now I must get a PH meter!
-Bill
One day I will add something here...

Offline rosawoodsii

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Re: Grainy ricotta
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2012, 07:28:37 AM »
IMHO you should process your whey for Ricotta immediately and not let it sit for a day or two. You may or may not have to use vinegar depending on the acidity of the whey. For example, whey from Mozzarella (quicky or traditional) is already acidic enough. Whey from a Colby is going to be over 6.0 so that would have to be acidified.

"Real" Ricotta is traditionally made from Mozzarella whey, so there would be very little or no need for additional acidity.

At a meeting of the local cheese guild, there was a conversation about ricotta making and how they whey never comes clear.  One of the members observed that he always let it sit for at least 24 hours, and it always came clear.  A little research on the internet found several sites that instructed to let the whey sit for 12-24 hours, so I've always felt comfortable doing that.  Since I don't make Mozzarella, I rarely have whey that's acid enough, and I prefer the taste without the vinegar.

I don't think the age of the whey, though, has anything to do with the graininess, since this is something new.  Of course, I've been making new cheeses lately, new for me, that is.  I wonder if that's the difference?
Joy


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