Author Topic: rapid flocculation/low pH in make  (Read 873 times)

Online scasnerkay

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rapid flocculation/low pH in make
« on: November 28, 2012, 08:52:49 PM »
I generally use about 1.75 ml of the liquid calf rennet from Mad Millie for my makes with 2 gallons of milk. This tends to give me a flocculation time of 13 to 15 mins. On makes such as feta, where the culture is in the milk for longer, the flocculation tends to be more like 9 mins.
My question involves two makes (a fast cheddar, and a traditional mozzarella) where I intentionally waited for  the pH to be 6.4 before adding rennet, and then the flocculation was less than 5 mins. In fact I cannot be sure it was not even faster, because I was not paying enough attention thinking it was not time yet....
However, for 2 other makes of the traditional mozzarella, I also waited for a pH of 6.4, and the flocculation was 9 and 10 mins.
I am not convinced that my pH meter is accurate, and I have started to be more consistent with cleaning and calibrating before each use.
So, is there any suggestion or guideline for decreasing the amount of rennet when working with a lower pH target?
Susan


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: rapid flocculation/low pH in make
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2012, 12:50:08 AM »
Use the same amount. Flocculation isn't meant to apply to the lower pH ranges, as tangential gelation rate is too rapid to be reliable. Floc is meant for a 6.4-6.5 rennet ph, typical for continental styles.
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Online scasnerkay

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Re: rapid flocculation/low pH in make
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2012, 05:10:26 PM »
LB, on your website for wacheese - traditional mozzarella, you suggest 6.4, flocculation in 8 to 12 mins, and using a multiplier of 3 to 4.  So, it does seem like my amount of rennet was a bit too much.

And if we are not using flocculation, then what? Just watch for clean break?

Is the rapid flocculation because of low pH level?
Why wait to such a low pH before renneting? I did it only as it was suggested, not understanding the reason for doing so...
Susan

Offline linuxboy

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Re: rapid flocculation/low pH in make
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2012, 07:17:08 PM »
You can still use it, but make the mental adjustment. Reason is tangential gellation rate is not geometric because pH is not geometric. So the moisture retention when you use a floc multiplier of 3x when rennet pH is 6.5 will not be the same moisture retention at when rennet is 6.4. The reason to use floc is it achieves consistency within a cheese family or for a cheese. So when milk changes, if you only make cheddar, the moisture will be the same for cheddar regardless of milk changes.

My suggestion was for store milk using that recipe and approach. Can always be fine-tuned if you're not hitting final moisture targets.
Quote
Is the rapid flocculation because of low pH level?
Yes.

Quote
Why wait to such a low pH before renneting? I did it only as it was suggested, not understanding the reason for doing so...
When you make mozz, the goal is to regulate the degree, and rate of calcium degradation. You need that calcium to break up for mozz to plasticize and stretch. This is controlled by three points: rennet pH (ultra critical), drain pH (less critical but important), and then the stretch pH. Exposing milk to acid when milk is liquid breaks down the most calcium... more fluidity, more brownian motion, more collisions. As that water is removed after gellation, acid increases but acts more slowly on the calcium bonds. So you then have to watch the drain pH. And after that, everything is set in motion You just wait until the cheese plasticizes.

For mozz, you can go even lower for rennet pH, but then you really have to be very precise and know what you're doing. 6.4 is a good middle ground.
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