Author Topic: 2 experiments  (Read 602 times)

Offline Alpkäserei

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Indiana/Kanton Bern
  • Posts: 583
  • Cheeses: 60
  • Default personal text
    • https://www.facebook.com/Kaesereigrimwald
2 experiments
« on: December 24, 2012, 11:57:06 AM »
There were two cheeses from last summer that had errors from improper pressing. So we decided to make an experiment out of them. These cheeses were left to develop a natural rind without washing due largely to surface flaws that would not have allowed proper washing.

First a few notes on the cheeses.

These cheeses were made according to the recipe used for our Oberlander Käse, with a lower cooking temp and shorter cooking time to yield a softer paste.

These cheeses were aged 6 to 6 1/2 months before the first was cut open.

The shorter cooking time resulted in less culture development during the make, which resulted in a slightly less acidic cheese.

The cheese were allowed to develop natural molds on a few occasions, which were wiped off before they were left to dry out. This cycle continued until the molds no longer were able to grow. The rinds, despite a lack of washing, were able to develop a very light b. linen coating as can be seen.

The cheeses did get attacked by yeasts on a few occasions. This is one of the reasons (plus my fear of mold, deal with it I'm Swiss) why I choose to cut the rind off and not eat it.

We cut one open last week. Here it is:


A few notes on appearance. You can see toward the edges a few small mechanical opening. However, the holes in the middle of the cheese are all clearly from gas (maybe not so clear in the picture, but very clear in person) This is a flaw, and the number of the holes here would be considered a major flaw. This cheese would for this reason alone be automatically disqualified to be sold as our Oberlander. There is a very faint off taste (proprianic) in conjunction with these holes. This is undesirable for this cheese. This is largely a result of not caring for these cheeses post make.

We knew these cheeses would be below grade, but decided to let them go, they might still be good enough for us to eat.

As for the flavor, I am overall pleased and surprised by its quality. For the most part, it has the flavor of a somewhat less than mature Alpkäse, though a much softer paste. I personally detect an unpleasant undertone that no one else seems to even notice. To me, the flavor suggests milk that was not up to par. This I have been told by others is a specific flavor that only those with dairy experience are able to notice. So maybe it's all good. I want to give samples to a few others and see what they say.
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline bbracken677

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Dallas, Tx
  • Posts: 1,166
  • Cheeses: 16
  • I love me some cheese!
Re: 2 experiments
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2012, 12:15:00 PM »
Even though they are "flawed" by your definition...they still look good and apparently taste good. 

Nice experiment!   :)

Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,124
  • Cheeses: 38
Re: 2 experiments
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2012, 01:25:40 PM »
Look good to me!  BTW  Don't feel alone, I can detect the use of red clover the bees used to make the honey used to make Mead.  I'm told that this is very unusual by the folks at the vineyards.

Offline Alpkäserei

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Indiana/Kanton Bern
  • Posts: 583
  • Cheeses: 60
  • Default personal text
    • https://www.facebook.com/Kaesereigrimwald
Re: 2 experiments
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2012, 04:32:04 PM »
they are good enouhgh for personal consumption. however, our requirements for commercial cheese are extremely tight and unforgiving. these cheeses dont meet our standards.
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser

Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,124
  • Cheeses: 38
Re: 2 experiments
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2012, 05:38:22 PM »
I understand that most "Stiltons" are sold as lower grades of blue cheese because they don't meet the high standards set for that cheese.  Can't you guys do something similar or is there no lower grade of this cheese?


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Alpkäserei

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Indiana/Kanton Bern
  • Posts: 583
  • Cheeses: 60
  • Default personal text
    • https://www.facebook.com/Kaesereigrimwald
Re: 2 experiments
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2012, 07:21:21 PM »
lower grades go for casual eating. these are for our own consumtion, or others who are willing to take them. we may sell them to friends and family at a lower cost who know what they are, but they will never go in the case, or with us to market, etc.

and they also will never be labeled with the names.
think of it like parm. these cheeses are graded, and the rejects are sold as shredded cheese. this same practice is used for emmentaler and other swiss cheeses
our cheeses are graded and sorted and only the best ones are left to age the longest periods. 
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser

Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,124
  • Cheeses: 38
Re: 2 experiments
« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2012, 09:36:46 AM »
Well at least it's not a total loss then.