Author Topic: An old baby Gouda  (Read 1373 times)

Offline hoeklijn

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An old baby Gouda
« on: December 24, 2012, 03:31:17 PM »
At Christmas Eve I cut the oldest Baby Gouda I ever had. It was made at July 14, but to my surprise I found out that I had not posted anything about it. I used a mix of Lactococcus lactis and Lactococcus cremoris and only washed it once, trying to keep it a bit more moisty because I wanted it to age longer.
I know almost half a year is not so long, but in the past my attempts to age baby Gouda's were not so successful because they became too dry.
I coated these three times, also to prevent them from drying too much.
And it turned out to be a lovely cheese. Starting to be a bit crumbly, very nice flavor, good salt balance and tasting like an over aged Gouda. Jammy!
 
- Herman -


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Online Al Lewis

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2012, 04:15:08 PM »
Sweet!!  Looks like an aged cheddar.  Glad it worked out for you!  A cheese to you for you patience. 8)

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2012, 05:29:15 AM »
Thanks Al! Aged Gouda is known for its colour. I love this one...
- Herman -

Offline Boofer

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2012, 06:54:32 AM »
Beautiful cheese, Herman!

You've captured its character in that photo. Looks very appealing.

A cheese to you for a finely aged Baby Gouda. :)

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Offline Red

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2012, 11:38:30 PM »
Looks delicious!

You said you "coated it three times" ....  with what?


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Offline hoeklijn

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2012, 05:21:52 AM »
I use a kind of plastic coating that is used all over Europe for Gouda type cheeses, as well produced in the big factories as by artisan cheesemakers and cheesefarms. I just lately discovered that most of the Gouda cheeses that are exported to the US are waxed.
Boofer knows a supplier for the type of coating that I use and used it himself.
- Herman -

Offline Tiarella

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2012, 06:56:45 AM »
Beautiful cheese, Herman!!!   Does the color develop because of the cultures used?  Or something else?  it is lovely, as all your cheeses are!

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2012, 12:10:59 PM »
Thanks, and it's delicious. Nothing special added for the color, it's from summer milk which is more yellow and older Gouda's will become a kind of yellow/orange depending on their age...
- Herman -

Offline Tiarella

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2012, 04:44:38 PM »
Thanks, and it's delicious. Nothing special added for the color, it's from summer milk which is more yellow and older Gouda's will become a kind of yellow/orange depending on their age...

Yes,s but WHY do they become yellow/orange????  What makes them specially do that?  I age stuff out but it doesn't turn that color, even with summer milk.  Curious mind wants to know about this......

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2012, 03:44:04 AM »
But aren't you only using goat milk? That is known to be much more white because the drops of fat are much smaller. That's not the right scientific description, but I was told that this is one of the reasons that goat milk is more white, even after a longer period of aging.
- Herman -


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Offline Tiarella

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2012, 07:02:35 AM »
Hi Herman,  Yes I'm using goat milk so I wasn't meaning for me but rather why in other styles of cow cheese is the paste so much lighter in color?  Or maybe I'm wrong about that?  When I had a cow as a teenager we didn't make many types of cheese but none of them were so golden orange in color so I'm curious about what makes the Gouda so orange.  Special culture, aging or technique?  It won't ruin my sleep not knowing but I am curious.

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2013, 08:29:30 AM »
Special culture, aging or technique?

No, I'm using normal cultures, no additives like annatto, no special techniques as far as I know  ^-^, so it must be the aging, maybe combined with the fact that it is a brined cheese? When you search on Google images on "overjarige kaas", which means over-aged cheese, you find a lot of pictures but you'll notice that there is a variety in color, probably also caused by differences in age. Maybe LB or Iratherfly can shine a light on this?
- Herman -

Offline Tiarella

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2013, 10:41:58 AM »
Special culture, aging or technique?

No, I'm using normal cultures, no additives like annatto, no special techniques as far as I know  ^-^, so it must be the aging, maybe combined with the fact that it is a brined cheese?

Herman, maybe it's magic.  Maybe it's the brilliant color of the tulips that inspire the cheese!

Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: An old baby Gouda
« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2013, 10:30:55 PM »
I have often wondered about Gouda, and why they are this color.

The Alpkäse is not so orange, even when it is 3 years old

here is a photo from google, just because I don't feel like looking through and uploading anything right now  ;)



This is a cow's milk cheese, made only from summer milk.
Guät git's dr schwiizer Chäser