Author Topic: Doing Double Gloucester  (Read 2357 times)

Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,092
  • Cheeses: 38
Doing Double Gloucester
« on: December 30, 2012, 09:38:53 AM »
As the title suggests I am about to embark on making a double gloucester using the recipe in 200 Easy Homemade Cheese Recipes.  I do, however, have a question or two for those of you that have experience in this sort of thing.  First off the recipe calls for aging, at a very cold temperature 47f?, for 6 months to get it sharp.  Will adding sharp lipase aid this in any way or is it just for Italian cheeses.  Next, the recipe simply calls for mesophilic culture. I have different ones i.e PHN-19, a standard culture described as (4 selected bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp.lactis biovar. diacetylactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris ) and, of course, I have Flora Danica.  I am assuming that the standard culture is the one I want but, would combining it with a bit of one of the others improve on the end product?  Finally, I'll be using PH milk, 4 gallons, and planned on adding some heavy cream to this at a rate of 1 pint per gallon, good idea/bad idea??  Thanks for your help.  I just hate to put this much time into something just to find out I could have done things better in the beginning if I had known about them.  One last question, I just got a 6" mold, would that be better for molding this so it's a tall cheese or should I use the 8" for a flatter round?
« Last Edit: January 05, 2013, 01:48:30 PM by Al Lewis »


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Schnecken Slayer

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Newcastle, Australia
  • Posts: 423
  • Cheeses: 14
  • Making cheese since October 2012
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2012, 09:59:44 AM »
Debbie uses MA11 as per http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,1526.msg11531.html#msg11531
Oh, leave out the chives and onion....  ;D
-Bill
One day I will add something here...

Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,092
  • Cheeses: 38
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2012, 10:04:20 AM »
Don't have any of that but I will have for the next batch. ;)  What's the difference between the MA11 and the MA16?  Both seem to be for the same cheeses.

Offline Schnecken Slayer

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Newcastle, Australia
  • Posts: 423
  • Cheeses: 14
  • Making cheese since October 2012
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2012, 10:17:48 AM »
Looking at a couple of sites it seems like they are different blends of (LL) Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and (LLC) Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris
-Bill
One day I will add something here...

Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,092
  • Cheeses: 38
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2012, 10:27:14 AM »
Guess I'll order the MA-11 then.  I had originally planned on using Boofer's recipe from his make but I couldn't convert the ice cubes of rennet.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 10:36:22 AM by Al Lewis »


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,976
  • Cheeses: 197
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2012, 10:55:07 AM »
Quote
Will adding sharp lipase aid this in any way or is it just for Italian cheeses.
You can do whatever you want. Adding lipase will increase fat breakdown. Is that what you want? It will taste more like a provolone then. 
Quote
Next, the recipe simply calls for mesophilic culture. I have different ones i.e PHN-19, a standard culture described as (4 selected bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp.lactis biovar. diacetylactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris ) and, of course, I have Flora Danica.  I am assuming that the standard culture is the one I want but, would combining it with a bit of one of the others improve on the end product?
The culture selection is one of the primary determinants of flavor. You can really use any meso culture, but the results will be subtly different, as will the acidification curve. If you use an LD type culture, which both of those are, it will produce some more buttery notes and potentially some gas openings in the cheese body. Will it improve the end product? Compared to what? And improve how? For some, a sulphury note to cheddar types is an improvement, for some it is a defect.
Quote
Finally, I'll be using PH milk, 4 gallons, and planned on adding some heavy cream to this at a rate of 1 pint per gallon, good idea/bad idea??
What is your reasoning for this? with PH milk and that much fat, your curds are going to be more fragile and harder to drain.

Quote
beginning if I had known about them.  One last question, I just got a 6" mold, would that be better for molding this so it's a tall cheese or should I use the 8" for a flatter round?
Personal preference. How are you aging? natural, wax, cloth w lard?
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,092
  • Cheeses: 38
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2012, 11:00:40 AM »
Finally, I'll be using PH milk, 4 gallons, and planned on adding some heavy cream to this at a rate of 1 pint per gallon, good idea/bad idea??
What is your reasoning for this? with PH milk and that much fat, your curds are going to be more fragile and harder to drain.

Quote
beginning if I had known about them.  One last question, I just got a 6" mold, would that be better for molding this so it's a tall cheese or should I use the 8" for a flatter round?
Personal preference. How are you aging? natural, wax, cloth w lard?


Thanks for the help.  I thought perhaps the extra cream would improve the end product as I'm not sure what the cream level is in this store bought milk as opposed to the raw milk I get from the farm.

With regards to aging, I'll be waxing this once it dries enough.

Online H-K-J

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: South-east Id
  • Posts: 1,155
  • Cheeses: 63
  • By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.
    • Cookin with uh dash dogs hair
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2012, 11:09:25 AM »
I have been thinking about one of these what recipe will you be using Al??
act as if it were impossible to fail.

Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,092
  • Cheeses: 38
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2012, 11:17:47 AM »
Using the recipe in 200 Easy Homemade Cheese Recipes.

Online H-K-J

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: South-east Id
  • Posts: 1,155
  • Cheeses: 63
  • By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.
    • Cookin with uh dash dogs hair
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2012, 11:29:39 AM »
I haven't got that one and the library doesn't either, dang!! :'(
act as if it were impossible to fail.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline bbracken677

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Dallas, Tx
  • Posts: 1,166
  • Cheeses: 16
  • I love me some cheese!
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2012, 11:32:39 AM »
I can post the recipe, later, if you like. 

Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,092
  • Cheeses: 38
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2012, 11:35:54 AM »
I haven't got that one and the library doesn't either, dang!! :'(

Well you should have said earlier.  I could have sent you one for Christmas! LOL


Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,092
  • Cheeses: 38
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2012, 11:37:44 AM »
Here is the recipe/procedure I'll be using.

Double Gloucester

16 qts whole milk
1/2 tsp mesophilic culture
1/8 tsp annatto (optional)
3/4 tsp CaCl
3/4 tsp liquid rennet
3 tbspn salt
cheese wax

1. Heat milk to 90F (32C) stirring gently Turn off heat.

2. Sprinkle culture over surface on milk and let stand for about 5 minutes to rehydrate. Stir in an up-and-down motion, gently drawing culture down into milk. Cover and let ripen for 1 hour, maintaining the temperature at 90F (32C).

3. Dilute annatto in 1/4 cup (50 ml ) cool water and stir into milk. Let stand for 15 minutes Annatto must be incorporated into the milk al least I5 minutes before the rennet is added because it interferes with the coagulation.

4. Dilute calcium chloride in 1/4 cup (50 ml) cool water. Add to milk using the same up and down motion.

5. Dilute rennet in 1/4 cup (50 ml) cool water. Add to milk and, using the same up-and-down motion. Cover pot and let set for 45 minutes, maintaining the temperature.

6. Check for a clean break. If necessary, leave for another 5 to 10 minutes or until you achieve a clean break. Using a long-bladed knife cut curd into 1/4 inch (0.5cm) pieces.  Stir gently for 15 minutes.  I use a really big whisk for this step.

7. Return heat to low and slowly warm curds to 99F (37"C), stirring gently and continuously, adjust the heat as necessary to make sure it takes 45 minutes to reach 99F. Let curds settle. Hold for 20 minutes

8. Pour contents of pot into a cheese cloth-lined colander. Return curds to pot. Press curds down with your hands into a flat cake. Cover the pot and hold for 15 minutes. Turn curd over in the pot, cover and hold for another 15 minutes.

9. Cut curd mass into 4 pieces and pile them one on top of the other in the pot. Cover and hold for 15 minutes. Turn the whole stack of curd over. Cover and hold for another 15 minutes.

10. Place the curd on a cutting board and cut into 1-inch by 1/2-inch (2.5 by 1.25 cm) pieces. Place in a bowl and toss with salt. Fill prepared mold with curds, pressing down firmly as you fill. Pull cloth up neatly around curds and fold excess over the top with as few wrinkles as possible. Put on the follower.

11. Place mold in cheese press or place a weight on top. Press cheese at medium pressure (20 pounds) for 1 hour. Remove from press and re-dress. Continue pressing at firm pressure ( 200 pounds) overnight.

12. Remove cheese from press and unwrap. Dry cheese at room temperature until fairly dry to the touch.

13. Coat cheese with cheese wax. Ripen at 56F (13.3C) for at least 1 month or for up to 6 months for sharper flavor. Turn cheese weekly to ensure even ripening.

« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 03:25:40 PM by Al Lewis »

Online H-K-J

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: South-east Id
  • Posts: 1,155
  • Cheeses: 63
  • By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.
    • Cookin with uh dash dogs hair
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2012, 12:04:11 PM »
Thank you for that, have it in my recipe file now ;D
act as if it were impossible to fail.

Offline Al Lewis

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Port Orchard Washington
  • Posts: 1,092
  • Cheeses: 38
Re: Doing Double Gloucester
« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2012, 12:17:55 PM »
That's all of it.  For the medium weight I'll be using 20 pounds and 200 pounds for the final pressing.  Waiting for the culture to do its thing.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 12:32:22 PM by Al Lewis »