Author Topic: First Pressed Cheese: Gouda #1  (Read 491 times)

Offline Tom Turophile / CheeseStud

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Atlanta
  • Posts: 171
  • Cheeses: 3
  • Default personal text
First Pressed Cheese: Gouda #1
« on: January 09, 2013, 02:47:44 PM »
Ok, I'm getting tired of researching and planning and making and buying equipment.  Last week, with some spare wood from building cabinets, I finally made a cheese press.  Now that I have one, and a cheese fridge (that I rigged), I just need to dive in.  The local cheese supplier only had a small cheese mold, which is good 2 gallons, so I think I'll start with a gouda.  Shorter aging time than many, and a mild flavor that will be easier to have others try.

I don't have my pH meter yet, but I just need to try some.  I've made enough fresh cheeses at this point without one.

Unfortunately, the recipe in 200 Cheeses is for 4 gallons; either I scale that down or use another.

If anyone has any good recipes, or a recommendation for other pressed cheeses, let me know!
CheeseStud(.com coming soon)
4 store-bought cow's milk mozzarellas, 1 rather rubbery raw cow milk mozz, cow's feta that melted, 0 ricotta


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Online JeffHamm

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
  • Posts: 2,387
  • Cheeses: 129
  • As goes the cheesemaker, so goes the cheese
Re: First Pressed Cheese: Gouda #1
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2013, 04:23:17 PM »
Hi Tom,

Scaling it down is easy enough, just halve your ingredients, halve your brining time, but leave the rest the same.  I tend to recommend caerphilly to start, only because it is good to eat in about 3 weeks, and gouda really needs at least 2 months (and gets better again at 6) to develop decent flavour.  There are a number of make procedures found here for caerphilly, but also have a look at some of the makes for lancashire, which is good in 2 months.  Butterkase is another one that is ready in a couple months, and it's a washed curd like gouda. 

Anyway, if 2 months or so sounds like a time frame you can wait, then go for it.  Scaling down isn't hard to do.  Your pressing schedule doesn't change, etc.  Good luck with it, and keep us updated with what you decide.  Include photos (of your press and your cheese).

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Tom Turophile / CheeseStud

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Atlanta
  • Posts: 171
  • Cheeses: 3
  • Default personal text
Re: First Pressed Cheese: Gouda #1
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2013, 03:19:23 PM »
Thanks for the advice -- I called my local supply store, and they have the Flora Danica that I would need to make caerphilly.  We'll see...

Wensleydale looks even simpler -- waxed / no concern of RH, and no brining.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2013, 03:46:20 PM by Tom Turophile / CheeseStud »
CheeseStud(.com coming soon)
4 store-bought cow's milk mozzarellas, 1 rather rubbery raw cow milk mozz, cow's feta that melted, 0 ricotta

Online JeffHamm

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
  • Posts: 2,387
  • Cheeses: 129
  • As goes the cheesemaker, so goes the cheese
Re: First Pressed Cheese: Gouda #1
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2013, 11:54:04 PM »
Hi Tom,

You make decent gouda, caerphilly, and wensleydale using cultured buttermilk from the grocery store.  Just buy a 500 ml (a pint) of cultured buttermilk, let it sit a room temperature for the day, and it should thicken a bit.  Make ice cubes out of it, and use 4 to 6 of them for 10 L. 

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Tom Turophile / CheeseStud

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Atlanta
  • Posts: 171
  • Cheeses: 3
  • Default personal text
Re: First Pressed Cheese: Gouda #1
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2013, 01:11:37 PM »
Hi Tom,

You make decent gouda, caerphilly, and wensleydale using cultured buttermilk from the grocery store.  Just buy a 500 ml (a pint) of cultured buttermilk, let it sit a room temperature for the day, and it should thicken a bit.  Make ice cubes out of it, and use 4 to 6 of them for 10 L. 

- Jeff

Thanks -- I happened to just be looking into that; I had no idea that there were so many combinations of cultures.  I thought they were all one of two until this weekend -- meso and thermo.

The Wensleydale calls for meso and meso b; what if I just use meso?  Is it still a Wensleydale?  Or just a (similar) variation?
CheeseStud(.com coming soon)
4 store-bought cow's milk mozzarellas, 1 rather rubbery raw cow milk mozz, cow's feta that melted, 0 ricotta


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Online JeffHamm

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
  • Posts: 2,387
  • Cheeses: 129
  • As goes the cheesemaker, so goes the cheese
Re: First Pressed Cheese: Gouda #1
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2013, 03:40:31 PM »
Hi Tom,

Meso and Thermo are broad generalisations, or categories, which basically refer to the idea that some cultures work best at lower temperatures (usually best under 35 C) and some work best at higher temperatures (over 35 C).  So "meso" and "thermo" really refer to the temperature range that a culture is suited to (think rule of thumb here, rather than carved in stone though).

Now, what those cultures do with respect to flavour, depends upon which one you use, and which strain you use.  For example, "flora danica", which is a meso culture made up of 4 cultures, has the same 4 cultures as cultured buttermilk.  However, the strains will differ, and the proportions will differ, so you won't get exactly the same result using buttermilk as flora danica.  Other "meso" cultures will have 2, or 3, different types of cultures, and you can buy singles as well (which allows you to vary the proportions of each type/strain yourself). 

If you search around on the forum, you will find various discussions on what each of the cultures do and what they contribute to the flavour development.  Aroma B is similar to flora danica, and both produce buttery flavours, etc.  Buttermilk works fine as well.  You will get some differences in outcome if you use a different culture mix, but in my opinion, when you're starting out, just use what you have.  Learn to produce a decent cheese, that ages well, doesn't crack, and tastes good.  Once you've got your techniques down, then start fiddling around with different culture mixes and see how things change.  Build a skill set by keeping some things constant, then have some fun by changing something.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,029
  • Cheeses: 177
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: First Pressed Cheese: Gouda #1
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2013, 08:48:47 AM »
Alright, Jeff, good job!

I visualize you at the front of the class, enrobed in your white smock, gesturing and lecturing as I would imagine you doing. I can also visualize all the students in your classroom, paying rapt attention to what you are presenting and taking copious notes, hands thrusting into the air to ask additional questions.... 8)

For being so patient and informative, please accept this humble cheese.

Tom, it's good to see you finally wading in up to your hips. You've been waiting on the dock for a while now. :)

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.