Author Topic: Understanding Yogurt. Why the high temp preheat?  (Read 882 times)

Offline Susan

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Northern Kentucky
  • Posts: 320
  • Cheeses: 11
  • Default personal text
Understanding Yogurt. Why the high temp preheat?
« on: January 25, 2013, 11:50:46 AM »
In the past I haven't made much yogurt.  But I've decided to dive in.  So I understand that the are therophilic cultures requiring the 110-115 temp.  But why do we preheat the milk to 190-200 then cool it back down?  I am using raw milk and prefer not to pasturize.  But do I have to 'pasturize' so that natural bacteria don't outcompete my yogurt cultures?  That is my best guess.  But I just made some without preheating.... Will see how that goes. 

Also, how critical is it to hold the temperature after inoculating?  It seems pretty loosey goosey as many put it in an oven with light on, or cooler with warm water.  I'm guessing with both methods the temp cools over the course of the 12 or so hours you are incubating?  TIA! 
Susan


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,986
  • Cheeses: 198
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline Susan

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Northern Kentucky
  • Posts: 320
  • Cheeses: 11
  • Default personal text
Re: Understanding Yogurt. Why the high temp preheat?
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2013, 01:01:42 PM »
I searched and searched but somehow missed these discussion. :-[  Thank you for the links.  Excellent discusions!  Now I get it.  So my current batch of yogurt will be 'protein challenged'.  I will see how it goes.  I went to see my farmer friend today.  The (2) cows gave me 5+ gallons.  This was just the extra that I didn't fit into the 5 jugs.  With my newfound knowledge I can now start of new batch with one of my precious gallons!

I usually don't drink this milk without skimming because has LOTS of cream (Jersey cow).  I plan to make this batch of yogurt without skimming.  But that may have to change if I start to tip the scales....  I'm guessing it would work fine with a skimmed gallon as would still have as much/more fat than a store bought gallon?
Susan

Offline MrsKK

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Wisconsin
  • Posts: 1,875
  • Cheeses: 61
  • Default personal text
Re: Understanding Yogurt. Why the high temp preheat?
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2013, 07:07:19 AM »
Yogurt cream is to die for!  But I've gone to skimming my milk for yogurt, as I use the cream for butter, mascarpone, etc.

I tried just warming my milk to 110, 140, etc. but sometimes got very grainy or even slimy yogurt.  Once I tried 185 degrees the inconsistent results ended.

I drain mine for Greek yogurt and love it, especially with our home-grown honey and a bit of vanilla.

Offline Tomer1

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Israel
  • Posts: 1,669
  • Cheeses: 33
  • Default personal text
Re: Understanding Yogurt. Why the high temp preheat?
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2013, 04:51:58 PM »
I think you get some protein modification when heating up the milk to near boil, making the end product thicker.
Amatuar winemaker,baker, cook and musician
not in any particular order.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.