Author Topic: Protective culture. Does it acidifies the milk?  (Read 791 times)

Offline Albert

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Catalunya
  • Posts: 50
  • Cheeses: 5
  • Default personal text
Protective culture. Does it acidifies the milk?
« on: January 26, 2013, 09:46:08 AM »
Hi everyone.
I normaly use only mesophilic cultures (Danisco's MA4001) for my hard cheeses. I would like to use some protective cultures because I always use raw milk. I bought the Lyofast LPR A cultures from Clerici Sacco. This cultures consists of a strains of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus plantarum who inhibiting unwanted bacteria, yeasts and moulds. So, the question is: does anyone knows if this cultures gives also acidification or not? If yes, I have to be carefull with the total amount of cultures (mesophilic + protective), if not, I can use the same amount of mesophilic cultures than before using this, right?
Excuse me for my bad english and my newbies questions...
Thank you all.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,539
  • Cheeses: 127
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Re: Protective culture. Does it acidifies the milk?
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2013, 11:52:36 AM »
First, when using raw milk, you should always reduce the amount of starter culture that you use. I use 25% less starter when I use raw milk.

Second, the adjunct cultures that you mentioned do produce some acid, but they are much slower and weaker. Their preferred food source is often Lactate, not Lactose, so they usually kick in well into the cheese making process. The manufacturer and/or the supplier can provide you with data sheets showing the pH curves, So, I also reduce my starter cultures a little bit to compensate for any additional acid production.

Third, be very consistent and take notes. Use a pH meter and check the pH at several steps along the way - raw milk, just before adding rennet, After cutting the curds, just before washing, at draining, at hooping, and just after you remove the cheese from the press. These will help you make good decisions about how to fine tune your recipes and make schedules,
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline Tomer1

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Israel
  • Posts: 1,669
  • Cheeses: 33
  • Default personal text
Re: Protective culture. Does it acidifies the milk?
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2013, 04:49:47 PM »
Quote
Their preferred food source is often Lactate, not Lactose
Isnt lactate part of the bacteria cell's energy cycle converting lactose into glucose and lactic acid? (lactate itself doesnt accure naturally in milk)
Amatuar winemaker,baker, cook and musician
not in any particular order.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,539
  • Cheeses: 127
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Re: Protective culture. Does it acidifies the milk?
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2013, 07:25:05 PM »
Lactose is a disaccharide (2 sugars) composed of glucose and galactose. The bonds between the 2 sugars must be broken before most organisms can use them to produce energy. Lactic Starter Bacteria (LSBs) are somewhat unique because they can begin the direct breakdown of Lactose, just like in a human body. Lactose chemistry is a science into itself, but basically various bacteria metabolize lactose into lactate, glucose, and then lactic acid. Many bacteria, yeast, and molds do not metabolize lactose directly. As the starter bacteria begin the initial breakdown into lactate, the adjunct jump in and start feeding on the bi-products.

Propionic shermanii is another good example that does not prefer to metabolize Lactose directly. That's why you can't maintain normal mother cultures of P. shermnii. One of the tricks that I do is start a normal Mother Culture (usually Aroma B). After initial coagulation, the MC goes into the frig and stays for 4 days. On the afternoon of the 4th day I remove the MC from the frig and inoculate with P. shermanii or P. roquefortii. I let that sit at room temp overnight and use it the next morning.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline Tomer1

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Israel
  • Posts: 1,669
  • Cheeses: 33
  • Default personal text
Re: Protective culture. Does it acidifies the milk?
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2013, 01:58:19 AM »
Cool, 
Amatuar winemaker,baker, cook and musician
not in any particular order.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Schnecken Slayer

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Newcastle, Australia
  • Posts: 433
  • Cheeses: 14
  • Making cheese since October 2012
Re: Protective culture. Does it acidifies the milk?
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2013, 02:08:36 AM »
Cool,

Yeah, I was going to say that, but couldn't formulate it in anything less than a bout a page.....   :)
-Bill
One day I will add something here...

Offline Albert

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Catalunya
  • Posts: 50
  • Cheeses: 5
  • Default personal text
Re: Protective culture. Does it acidifies the milk?
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2013, 02:16:21 PM »
Thank you Sailor con Queso for your answer.

First, when using raw milk, you should always reduce the amount of starter culture that you use. I use 25% less starter when I use raw milk.

Second, the adjunct cultures that you mentioned do produce some acid, but they are much slower and weaker. Their preferred food source is often Lactate, not Lactose, so they usually kick in well into the cheese making process. The manufacturer and/or the supplier can provide you with data sheets showing the pH curves, So, I also reduce my starter cultures a little bit to compensate for any additional acid production.

Third, be very consistent and take notes. Use a pH meter and check the pH at several steps along the way - raw milk, just before adding rennet, After cutting the curds, just before washing, at draining, at hooping, and just after you remove the cheese from the press. These will help you make good decisions about how to fine tune your recipes and make schedules,