Author Topic: Cam #2  (Read 1465 times)

Offline bbracken677

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Re: Cam #2
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2013, 01:35:16 PM »
They slimy was, more than likely, a geo party going to town. The problem with these kinds of cheeses is you need the correct amount of moisture in the cheese as well as in the air to make them work right...I find that humidity levels (for me) of 95-99% are perfect for geo and pc growth. Once the rind dries somewhat, it can be dificult to get the pc growing properly.


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Offline AndreasMergner

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Re: Cam #2
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2013, 01:14:37 PM »
BB, I still have about 95%+ humidity in the container.  The PC is just having a hard time with the geo.  I have growth of PC in the grid under the cheese, so my humidity can't be that off.  They are starting to get soft in some places so I figured I'd wrap them now for the fridge before they get slip skin.   Someone told me that their PC grew to cover the cheese while in the fridge so I'm crossing my fingers.  Here they are:


Offline bbracken677

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Re: Cam #2
« Reply #17 on: February 17, 2013, 09:27:59 AM »
It has been my experience, and recommended by forum folks that if you maintain temp at 50F you should not have trouble with slip skin and are best off leaving them in the container rather then wrapping the cheeses prior to ripening.  Think of it this way...if you take the cheese and reduce the temp from 50F to 37F then your cheeses will take much longer than 4 weeks to mature, if at all. Longer time in the fridge also means additional moisture loss which will affect the paste.

I experimented with some wrapping of cheese prior to being fully ripened and it is my standard procedure now to leave in the container at 50F until fully ripe and then transfer to fridge (actually at least half get eaten before ever making it to the fridge).  It seems normal for the rind to become a bit stiffer while the inside softens causing some sinking inward of the centers of the cheese but you should not experience a full blown slip skin provided temp and humidity are correct. Most often slip skin issues are the result of too high a ripening temp (ie: 55F or higher).

Offline AndreasMergner

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Re: Cam #2
« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2013, 07:02:38 PM »
Dang, I thought I had good info on this since it was iratherfly's recipe.  I put one in the 50-52 degree cave.  I left the other two in the fridge because I don't mind them taking longer....but then you mention moisture loss.  Ok, I guess I'll unwrap them all and put them back in a container in the cave.  :-/

Thanks for info BB! 

They don't seem to be doing much, to tell you the truth.  My Reblochon is the same way....  Do you also recommend that it stay in the cave also? 

Offline Brandnetel

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Re: Cam #2
« Reply #19 on: March 07, 2013, 08:38:54 PM »
Hey, Andreas - how did these turn out? I'm thinking you must have tried them by now? Very curious.
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Offline AndreasMergner

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Re: Cam #2
« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2013, 03:10:54 PM »
Brandnetel, I tried one just now.  They have been doing similarly to my Reblochon.  They have been leaking liquidy cheese from just below the rind while I can tell that the center is still firm.  I ended up lowering my cave temp to 45, but that didn't seem to help at all.  Here's a pic:



The paste is softer than that of the Reblochon, but doesn't seem to have ripened except for the 1/4" near the rind.  The flavor is much stronger than the Reblochon.  It actually tastes pretty good, but wish it was softer in the center and less liquid near the rind. 

I am all ears if you want to give me suggestions for next time....or what I can do with these.  Not sure if I want to eat it as a table cheese or not.

Offline BobE102330

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Re: Cam #2
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2013, 03:32:13 PM »
Dastardly slip skin - often keeps the interior from ripening further.  Here are some ideas for next time.

http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,4265.msg80208.html#msg80208

Offline bbracken677

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Re: Cam #2
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2013, 03:42:39 PM »
First off...they appear to be a bit on the thick side. The form factor is important since camemberts ripen from the outside in. If they are too thick they will not ripen in the interior.

Secondly...I think next time you should try keeping temp at 50F and 95% RH and forget the wrapping until they are fully ripened. Then wrap and stick in your fridge at 37ish once fully ripened in order to give them a longer shelf life.  I cannot say for sure how the slip skin occurred, but as long as you stick to 50F and 95% humidity that should be minimal.

I have not had good luck when wrapping my cheese prior to them being ripe....I have had great success ripening them in the container under the above conditions. Anything above 1 inch or so thickness tends to leave a center that is a bit chalky. Nothing wrong with it other than the texture isnt really what you are looking for.

After I have added rennet and waited the x6 flocc multiplier time from rennet addition I just ladle the curds straight into the camembert forms until they are full.  They will shrink as they drain until they are 1/4-1/3 their original height which is about what you want.  I usually wait extra time before flipping them the first time. I want them to be about 1/2 or maybe a bit higher than their original height before the first flip, otherwise it is likely to get really messy. Then I flip them every 4 hours or so as I am able for a day or so, and then twice daily until they come out of the molds.  I remove them from the molds once they have reached 1/4-1/3 original height. Then they are ready for salting...I salt the top side and then wait until the salt has melted/been incorporated into the cheese and then flip and salt the bottom (which is now the top) as well as the actual sides of the cheeses.

Offline Tomer1

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Re: Cam #2
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2013, 05:36:45 PM »
Another possible glitch:
Quote
pH at molding was 6.36 and was 5.95 at demolding/salting
Thats way too high. you need to get it down to 4.7-4.8.    acidity has a major influence on protein behavier and the way enzyme work, maybe Pav could comment on this?
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Cam #2
« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2013, 07:12:54 PM »
Another possible glitch:
Quote
pH at molding was 6.36 and was 5.95 at demolding/salting
Thats way too high. you need to get it down to 4.7-4.8.    acidity has a major influence on protein behavier and the way enzyme work, maybe Pav could comment on this?

I missed that...yes, It should be in the 4.8 range. The objective is for the PC to raise the pH as part of the ripening process. 


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