Author Topic: difference in cheese molds?  (Read 227 times)

Offline RedDawn

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difference in cheese molds?
« on: July 03, 2016, 11:52:07 AM »
Is there a significant difference between the baskety molds and the ones with straight sides and holes punched in them?

I'm not happy with the results of the basket mold I got in my starter kit. The cheese comes out uneven and I don't have anything that makes a good top plate, so I'm looking to "upgrade."  Any recommendations?

Also, is there some secret method for folding the cheesecloth around the cheese while it is pressing so it doesn't deform the shape of the curds? 

Online Fritz

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Re: difference in cheese molds?
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2016, 12:36:44 PM »
The "baskety" moulds are more for soft cheeses and ricotta and feta. Cheeses that usually don't get pressed, but are stackable so one fits inside another while pressing themselves by stacking these moulds with curds.

The one with holes and straight sides are more for cheeses that get put in a press and are usually sold with a "follower" top plate. One can apply much more pressure to these moulds than a baskety mould.

To make recommendation, we would need to understand how big of cheeses you plan to make, type of cheese you are making... And how "traditional or authentic" you want your cheeses to be. There are a good handful of cheese supply places that have moulds with descriptions of size, dimension and cheese type it is designed for.
You can easily start with a tomme mould that will do most cheeses if you are not picky about the shape of your cheeses. Eventually get more moulds more specific to your needs later.

With regards to the cheesecloth thing... I make sure to pull the cheesecloth tight from underneath by pulling up on the sides... For a smooth top I simply just use a single flat layer or two across the top... Not bunched up ...the excess being outside of the mould...and I don't use too big of a cheesecloth for the press. For smoother cheeses one can remove the cheesecloth and just press "bareback" without cheesecloth for the last few hours. There is a cool new netting used for cheese presses instead of cheesecloth which is not as bulky.

Hope this helps :)

Offline dickdeuel

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Re: difference in cheese molds?
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2016, 02:44:10 PM »
I have aquired quite a variety of mould shapes and sizes over time but the ones listed below are my favorite.

Large Mold for 4 - 6 gallon makes

For a two gallon make

For a taller form factor like blue cheese

Medium size for a 3 gallon make

For Camembert type cheese

Offline RedDawn

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Re: difference in cheese molds?
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2016, 05:04:14 PM »
Thanks for the suggestions.  I am making pretty small cheeses, from the sounds of it, no more than 2 gallons at a time.

For now I am just trying for something edible and cheese-like.  :)  I think medium to hard cheese like Monterey Jack, Cheddar, maybe a blue one day.  I'd like to try smoking some, also doing some flavored with herbs.

Offline La Cocinita

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Re: difference in cheese molds?
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2016, 05:30:13 PM »
We got six of the straight sided 'Prensado' molds with followers (http://ebay.to/29n16mc) because we had a specific size of packaging in mind before starting production.  We use the pint size vacuum bags, which we started out filling with half a wheel and eventually a third of a wheel from the molds.

10 gallons of milk makes exactly 6 wheels of cheese, so it all worked out quite well!

They are very heavy duty and we press all six at one time with about 40 pounds of pressure across the top.  The cheese comes out nice and dense, with just a bit of whey being released after vacuum packing.

Good Luck!