Author Topic: My 1st Port Salut  (Read 256 times)

Online JeffHamm

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My 1st Port Salut
« on: June 28, 2015, 02:37:49 AM »
I've wanted to try my hands on Port Salut for years, but for some reason have never quite got around to it.  Pav (Linuxboy) had posted some notes on it some times ago, and I copied them and have filled in a few bits from books - like how long to press, etc.  Anyway, this is a pretty quick make and I'll have it out of the brine in the morning, so I'll include a photo then (it's finishing up it's 8 hours in the press in just over an hour).  Anyway, the feel of this cheese is very "spongy" when I flip it due to the very light pressing it gets.  Also, you need to keep the curds warm when you do press and I'm sure under whey is the way to go.  Unfortunately, I press with weights and I don't want to put them in the whey as I would prefer not to contaminate the cheese with rust.  I can keep them off the cheese by propping them up on Duplo and other such things, but if they were sitting emersed in the whey, even in a towel, I'm not sure it would be food safe.  Anyway, this make seems to have gone fairly well so far.  The knit on the last flip was looking ok, but still not perfect.  Mind you, as this will get a wash, the b.linens should heal over any imperfections (I hope anyway).  This should be ready in around a month or so.  So, a fairly quick one.  It's not a particularly strong washed rind cheese, so if this protocol works well, it might be a good starting point.  Oh, and I think I should have used a different mould (a bit wider, closer to 8 inches as Port Salut is more disk than barrel shaped). 

Ok, snapped a shot before putting it into the brine.  Will be done in the morning. :)

And the 2nd photo is post-brine.  Down to 1674g, 15.4 x 7.9 cm, for 1.14g/cm3.  So, basically, into a ripening box and into the cave right away with this one.  I've washed a ripening box with boiling water to remove any wild blue moulds and other stuff from the cheeses that were in there (which were moved to a smaller box as they are fairly well cured now).  This one needs room to release moisture and get the box up to 90% humidity.  Brine wash tomorrow, and a few times after that.  This cheese doesn't develop a huge rind, so we'll see how it goes.


Port Salut - Classic - from linuxboy (Cheese forum; This is the industrial recipe)

The classic port salut is closer to 3-3.5% fat. 2-2.5% will give you a slightly lower yield, but similar flavor profile. If you pay close attention to aging, you should get a very similar cheese. Follow the flocculation multiplier and RH or the cheese will be more dry than you want. (0.88:1 p:f ratio target? Similar to muenster?)

5 L HomeBrand Blue
6 L Silver top (combined we get 0.84:1 p:f)
CaCl2 in egg cup water
4 ice cubes buttermilk (or, as Pav suggested for a more authentic make use Choozit TA 60 and Choozit Alp, equal parts according to manufacturer guidelines. Should be .85 DCU each for 17 l)
Rennet for 10-15 minute floc (3.5x multiplier; 1.77 ml 280 IMCU calf rennet)
1/16th tsp b.linens
6 ¼ inch tomme mould

1) Add CaCl2 to milk while setting up
2) Pour in pot and add starter and b.linens on top (wait 5 minutes, then stir in b.linens)
3) Warm to 35C (reached at 9:31   ; 35.2 C; remove from heat, wrap pot in towels)
4) Ripen 30 mins. (9:31 - 10:01 ; end temp 35.0 C)
5) Add rennet. (10:05:00  floc time 10:19: 00 = 14m 00sec 3x floc = 49m 00Sec )
6) Cut time (10:54:00 – cut to pea/hazelnut size ½ - 1 cm cubes – finished 11:10)
7) stir gently 30 minutes (11:10 - 11:40)
8) Drain 30% of the whey (4 l or so). Ph should be 6.4-6.45
9) Add hot (60C) water (10-15% volume, which in this case is about 2 liters). Raise total temp to around 37.8C in 12-20 mins. (11:40 - 12:03 ; final temp 37.4)
10) stir gently for 20 minutes, let curds settle to the bottom of the pot (12:03-12:25; 12:25 – 12:30)
11) Press under whey or in the pot with 2x own weight (about 2.5 kg 0.18 psi for 11 litres) for an hour (12:45 - 1:45 ; I went with “in the pot” water bath at 37 C; cheese knitting well, very soft and “spongy” feeling.  This light pressing requires the curds to be kept warm, hence in the pot/under whey)
12) refreshed sink water to 37 and flip and redress, press in pot with 2.5 kg (0.18 psi) 1 hour (1:45 - 3:15 – ran over time)
13) refreshed sink water to 39 Flip and redress, press in pot with 2.5 kg (0.18 psi; 1 hour (3:15 – 4:20) knit doing well, still soft and “spongy” but not as much as before. 
14) Flip and redress, press 5 kg (.36 psi) for another 5-9 hours (4:20 - 8:47) (8-12 hours total in the press - you want a good knit; if you measure ph, then look for ph 5.4)
15) Brine shouldn't be fully saturated, more around 18-20%. Brine 4-8 hours per kg. ph after brine should be 5.2 (1720g 15.7 x 8.0 = 1.11 g/cm3 - 8:55 - 6:00 am; 1674g 15.4 x 7.9 = 1.14g/cm3)
16) Dry at 90% humidity at 15.6C for 24 hours.
17) wash with 3% brine solution on days 1, 3, 7, and 10 (if you didn’t add b.linens, spray on with wash). After washed finished, 1650g 16.2 x 7.1 cm = 1.13 g/cm3 Age at 90% RH, 15.6 C. Brush off rind flora after 2 weeks and wash to get a cleaner rind. (washed on July 12, 2015; 1678g -> 1660 g after brushing/washing.  Outer rind quite soft, so brushing must be quite gentle.  Also, cheese very slippy, so handle with care, especially when washing under the tap).
18) Ripen for a few days at 70% RH to dry the rind a bit.  Package.
19) Cure at 4.4C for 2-3 weeks. (wrapped in foil, moved to regular fridge Wed, July15, 2015; 1610g x 16.5 x 6.6 = 1.13g/cm3; probably a bit less as cheese has love handles)
« Last Edit: July 15, 2015, 02:12:26 AM by JeffHamm »
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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 1st Port Salut
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2015, 02:38:26 AM »
Finished the washings today.  The surface has a nice schmeir developing, and it's quite slimy.  Will continue to age it in the cave until Sunday, when it's time to brush off the b.linens and wash the rind down to clean it.  Then, lower the humidity for a few days to dry the rind.  Wrap and move to the regular fridge, and give it a couple weeks before opening.  Yum!

- Jeff
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Offline John@PC

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Re: My 1st Port Salut
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2015, 03:39:31 PM »
Nice Jeff and a cheese for your Port Salut!  Also very nice "Kerning" showing on that last pic.

Offline Boofer

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Re: My 1st Port Salut
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2015, 06:21:59 PM »
Very interesting, Jeff. I've been more acquainted with the smaller form factor, as in my Saint Paulin.

I will be watching this larger variation on a theme that you've put together. Ripening may take longer than a couple weeks.  :P

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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 1st Port Salut
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2015, 08:30:22 PM »
Thanks guys.  Yes, the form factor is wrong.  I hadn't really thought about it until after it came out of the mould, then I realised that Port Salut is usually a disk, not a barrel.  I should have used my half-brie sized mould as that would have been a fairly standard size for P.S.  Oh well, it's not a strong b.linens cheese, and the internal paste doesn't go gooey, etc, so I'm not too fussed.  Also, as the height/width ratio is all wrong I don't expect it to ripen all the way in anyway to be honest.  I'm more curious to see how the paste and texture turn out due to the very light pressing.  It's knitted quite well, and the washing has developed the rind pretty nicely, so all is ticking over as it should.  I'm sure it will be edible, but probably quite a mild flavour.  Mind you, I have in the past, and will be again in the future, and may even now in the present, be wrong.

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Re: My 1st Port Salut
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2015, 09:14:55 PM »
I have recently discovered a Cheese supplier who imports "Delice du Jura" - is a good substitute for Reblochon, it is a soft cheese, made from pasteurised milk that apparently is Whey washed.  found a good description here tho' I do disagrrrreee with the authors level of stinkiness.  I found it to be a wonderful cheese and even still socially acceptable in an open office at lunch time.

http://functioningcheeseaddict.blogspot.com.au/2011/09/delice-du-jura-cheese-packagers-worst.html

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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 1st Port Salut
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2015, 02:26:58 AM »
Ooo, that looks good Mal!  I did a search, and most other descriptions seem to agree with you, that it is aromatic, but not a stinker.  Haven't come across any make notes for it though, but it seems to be Reb. substitute.  Perhaps that a starting point?

- Jeff

I found this: https://gourmetandmorestore.com/product/delice-du-jura/

where they say it's the same size and form as a brie.  So I'm thinking we're talking about 500g disk (8" diameter, an inch or so in thickness).  It's washed every two days with whey, but they don't indicate salt in the whey, which is interesting.  I'm thinking, then, starting with a cam type curd, no white mould, then brine it, then wash with whey.  Age at 90% humidity for two to three weeks to get the rind to develop, then stop the wash and bring the humidity down to around 70% to firm up and dry the rind.  Age another week or two, and that should be it.  The link Mal included suggested 2 week affinage, but that seems awfully short to develop the rind and soften the paste. 
« Last Edit: July 09, 2015, 02:44:56 AM by JeffHamm »
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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 1st Port Salut
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2015, 03:23:29 PM »
Today was two weeks in, and it was time to remove the flora.  The cheese feels quite soft compared to the cheddar types.  It's also very slippy and there is a great risk of dropping this one.  Brush lightly as well, as you could easily pit the cheese with any pressure.  Anyway, the first image shows the cheese before brushing, weighing 1678g and the 2nd image is after the cleaning at 1660g.  There's a good aroma developing the linens are doing their job.  Given the form factor is not quite right (should be wider and flatter), the cheese may have a progression of flavours - or it may not, time will tell.  :)

Anyway, will continue aging in the cave for a few days, with the box opened a bit more to lower the humidity to around 70% to dry the surface.  After that, wrap it up and move to the regular fridge for a couple weeks.  Exciting.

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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 1st Port Salut
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2015, 02:34:58 AM »
Alright, gave it a wipe down with a dry cloth to take off a bit of wild geo that was growing.  Then, as the surface is dry (though still soft, no real "rind" on this one), I wrapped it in foil and it's moved into the regular fridge.  No photos as it looks pretty much the same as above.  Weighs in at 1610g, measuring 16.5 x 6.6 cm, for a density of 1.13g/cm3.  However, as the cheese has settled, the sides are bulging a bit, so the volume would be a bit larger, making the density probably closer to 1.11 I would expect.  Not a big deal.  This cheese seems to have the right feel to it so far, compared to Port Salut I've bought, so I'm quite pleased with how things are going.  Has a good b.linens aroma too, so I think it's all going to plan.  Couple more weeks and we'll know I suppose.
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Offline awakephd

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Re: My 1st Port Salut
« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2015, 10:37:16 AM »
Looking forward to the taste report!
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Re: My 1st Port Salut
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2015, 04:08:10 PM »
Me too!   I might try this again, but use a larger mould and wash with Guiness.  I've wanted to try washing with Guiness for awhile now, and I think this might be a good base protocol to go with.
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.