Author Topic: Ripening Bacterias & Molds - Relative Strengths?  (Read 1652 times)

Offline John (CH)

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Ripening Bacterias & Molds - Relative Strengths?
« on: February 19, 2009, 06:23:09 PM »
I've recently made three different cheeses using three different molds:

The 4 Limburgers were in a separate box for aging whereas my last Camembert and Stilton enjoyed the same picnic cooler, although the two Camemberts that I have now wrapped had their own container.

What is interesting is that the Camembert's fended off the Stilton's moldy advances ;D, there was no blue mold even after 10 days when I wrapped them. Whereas the supposed very strong Limburger succumbed to the Stilton's blue after 4 days age and started turning blue even though in a separate cooler !

Thus I deduce that Penicillium candidum is more dominant than Penicillium roqueforti which more dominant than Brevibacteria Linens.

Not sure how useful this knowledge is other than my Camemberts made after the Stilton still bloomed and co-habitated safely (no blue on them).

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Ripening Bacterias & Molds - Relative Strengths?
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2009, 08:55:27 PM »
John is Linens a bacteria or a mold?
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline Wayne Harris

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Re: Ripening Bacterias & Molds - Relative Strengths?
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2009, 08:57:23 PM »
i *think* its a bacteria
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Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Ripening Bacterias & Molds - Relative Strengths?
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2009, 09:03:20 PM »
That's what i thought, but wasn't sure. In that case then that would have a different property when getting consumed or taking over other molds. As far as the blue being stronger I would suspect any mold that's health would be the dominant. I just finished retro fitting my small cave for camembert Wayne, I've got 4 hygrometers in it to test out the accuracy of the temp/humidistat.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Ripening Bacterias & Molds - Relative Strengths?
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2009, 05:01:06 PM »
Sorry, for the mistype in the OP saying mold, I labelled the thread Bacteria-Mold but in the post I said mold.

I just looked at Wiki which says:

As my biology is only high school level, and thus a long time ago, can someone help me simply understand the difference between fungus's, mold's, and bacteria's? I believe that fungus is a type of mold but that's about it.

Also, for Carter, I suspect you are right, if a mold is well dominant in a cheese, it can fend off others. All I know is my new Camemberts were in the same box as the Stilton and it's new mold was able to fend of the well established fungus and my new Limburgers bacteria were in a separate box and were not able to fend off the blue mold and now show no sign of the initial slipperyness that I assume was from the B linens.

Offline Captain Caprine

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Re: Ripening Bacterias & Molds - Relative Strengths?
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2009, 12:45:01 AM »
Actually John,
Brevibacterium is the genus name and linens is the species.
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