Author Topic: Tomme de Fleurette  (Read 954 times)

Offline Tomer1

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Tomme de Fleurette
« on: February 04, 2013, 06:53:30 PM »
Quote
A soft unpasturised cow’s cheese, made in Switzerland.
 
A round of soft white cheese, smattered with a bright white bloom, and striped with little ridges from where it’s been sitting on racks to mature. Inside it’s soft and pliable, the colour of cream.
 
This cheese is fantastically milky, and melts away to in my mouth. The thin delicate rind has a slightly crumbly texture, and tastes of heather, flowers and astringent herbs. This complements the utter drippiness of the inside of this cheese, which is smooth, creamy, gently sweet and nutty, and has just a hint of cocoa to it.


It sounds very interesting. is it a swiss twist on Brie (semi lactic) or is it something completly different - recipe wise.
I was thinking of just altering the regular tomme recipe for higher final moisture content and hope for the best but then I remember how final pH is crucial to get right and I might end up with a puddle of cheese instead of a creamy paste.

Looks like PC and GEO are responsible for ripening.


 
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2013, 08:13:57 AM »
I remember how final pH is crucial to get right and I might end up with a puddle of cheese instead of a creamy paste.
Yeah, Tomer, that sounds familiar to me. I tried something similar with my Taleggio #2.

With that make I used linens and Geo. Linens looks apparent in the Fleurette along with Geo. I would like to attempt that again and get the creaminess that the Fleurette seems to have. Everything went well except for the final texture. Maybe a lower floc factor and more attention to earlier wrapping, cooler affinage, and a little thicker form factor.

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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2013, 02:44:50 PM »
Boofer...a lower floc factor and thicker form factor will result in a less creamy texture and possibly more chalkiness unless the texture you achieved was extremely runny.

I have made several batches of camemberts and find that a x6 factor and 50F affinage temp is pretty critical to getting that creamy center. I do not wrap (after some experimentation) until the cheese is fully ripened, and then they go into the fridge at 37F.  If you age less, you are likely to under-develop the paste, and yet over aging coupled with a lower temps (40-44F) will result in a thicker, chalkier paste as well.

My least successful camemberts were the first batch (triple cream)...they never ripened properly and I suspect the biggest culprit was the temp (43F) and am fairly certain there were some dynamics involving the additional cream that played their part as well. I have used that same recipe, just without the additional cream and ripening at 50F with great success.

Offline Boofer

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2013, 05:18:26 PM »
Boofer...a lower floc factor and thicker form factor will result in a less creamy texture and possibly more chalkiness unless the texture you achieved was extremely runny.

I have made several batches of camemberts and find that a x6 factor and 50F affinage temp is pretty critical to getting that creamy center. I do not wrap (after some experimentation) until the cheese is fully ripened, and then they go into the fridge at 37F.  If you age less, you are likely to under-develop the paste, and yet over aging coupled with a lower temps (40-44F) will result in a thicker, chalkier paste as well.

My least successful camemberts were the first batch (triple cream)...they never ripened properly and I suspect the biggest culprit was the temp (43F) and am fairly certain there were some dynamics involving the additional cream that played their part as well. I have used that same recipe, just without the additional cream and ripening at 50F with great success.
Uhh, did you see my Taleggio link in my last post? :-\

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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2013, 05:24:47 PM »
wow lol...no, I missed the link somehow. Zowie, liquid cheese.

All I can say is careful about lowering temps...You slow down the aging, but to what end? A larger form factor would, perhaps, just leave the center less developed.

Perhaps another try with the recipe as is, but add a bit of cream and wait until fully ripe to wrap, would be my suggestion.


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Offline Back 2 The Frotture

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2013, 03:20:48 AM »
Looks like this cheese is essentially a Tomme Vaudoise.  Might be a good start to find out the proper cultures.

Offline Tomer1

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2013, 06:17:47 AM »
I remember how final pH is crucial to get right and I might end up with a puddle of cheese instead of a creamy paste.
Yeah, Tomer, that sounds familiar to me. I tried something similar with my Taleggio #2.

With that make I used linens and Geo. Linens looks apparent in the Fleurette along with Geo. I would like to attempt that again and get the creaminess that the Fleurette seems to have. Everything went well except for the final texture. Maybe a lower floc factor and more attention to earlier wrapping, cooler affinage, and a little thicker form factor.

-Boofer-


I think thickness was the issue here. did you use a low tomme mould?  Id go a bit taller , even for the sake of having some rubbery unripened paste in the middle.

I dont think these cheeses are acidified enough for a chalky paste. I wonder how some curd washing (20%) would effect the cheese.   

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Offline Boofer

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2013, 09:40:08 AM »
My small Kadova moulds gave a pretty good result here.

That might be the way to go this next time.

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Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2013, 03:59:53 PM »
Looks a lot runnier than Tomme du Vaudoise


From Wikipedia (no entry in English, sorry)
Quote
Der Tomme Vaudoise ist ein Weichkäse aus der Schweiz. Im 17. Jahrhundert wurde er noch ausschliesslich im Sommer in den Alphütten des Juras gekäst. Wegen seiner zunehmenden Beliebtheit weitete sich das Produktionsgebiet allerdings schnell aus, sodass der Tomme Vaudoise heute in der gesamten französischsprachigen Schweiz hergestellt wird.
Die Käselaibe des Tomme Vaudoise sind mit einem Durchmesser von 8 bis 9 Zentimetern, einer Höhe von etwa 2,5 Zentimetern und einem Gewicht von nur etwa 100 Gramm klein. Ihre zarte weisse Kruste ist von einer Schicht edlen Weissschimmels überzogen. Der Tomme Vaudoise reift nur 7 bis 10 Tage, sodass er in den Handel kommt, wenn er gerade die Schwelle vom Frisch- zum Weichkäse überschritten hat. Der Käse hat daher eine cremige Konsistenz und ein zartes Milcharoma.

Meaning,
The Tomme Vaudoise is a soft cheese from Switzerland. In the 17th century it was still exclusively made in the summer in the Alp huts of the Jura. Because of its increasing popularity the production quickly expanded, so that the cheese is today produced in all of French-speaking Switzerland.
The Cheese Loafs of the Tomme Vaudoise have a diameter of 8 to 9 cm and a height of about 2.5 cm and a weight of only about 100 grams. Its delicate white crust is covered with a layer of fine white mold. The Tomme Vaudoise is ripened only 7 to 10 days, so that when it goes to sale it has just crossed the threshold from fresh to soft cheese. The cheese has a creamy consistency and a delicate milk flavor.

hopefully this gives you some clue. Tomme Vaudoise that I have seen does not run out when cut, but stands up fairly firm.
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Offline Tomer1

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2013, 05:50:25 AM »
Thanks.
 I think I now have some idea on how to approach this.
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2013, 09:34:44 AM »
I remember how final pH is crucial to get right and I might end up with a puddle of cheese instead of a creamy paste.
Yeah, Tomer, that sounds familiar to me. I tried something similar with my Taleggio #2.

With that make I used linens and Geo. Linens looks apparent in the Fleurette along with Geo. I would like to attempt that again and get the creaminess that the Fleurette seems to have. Everything went well except for the final texture. Maybe a lower floc factor and more attention to earlier wrapping, cooler affinage, and a little thicker form factor.

-Boofer-


Lower floc, earlier wrapping, cooler (depending on what you mean here...I take it as in the 40s), and thicker form factor will all contribute to a less creamy texture, or at least, by my experience. 

I tried the cooler affinage and that was the only cam I have made that didnt get creamy at all.  As far as a thicker form factor...they mature from the rind inwards, so you will likely wind up with a chalky center if too thick.

 As far as a lower floc... do you mean more rennet or do you mean using a x5 instead of x6 factor? 


Offline Boofer

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2013, 09:54:14 AM »
As far as a lower floc... do you mean more rennet or do you mean using a x5 instead of x6 factor?
I used a 5x flocculation factor.

From page one of that posting:
"8:38 - floc'd - 8 minutes - I had intended to go with a 4x multiplier, but because of the higher pH I decided to do 5x
9:18 - after 40 minutes (8 min x 5), cut curds to 2 inches
"

Same quantity of rennet.

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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2013, 01:54:11 PM »
Cams and Brie's should be a x6 multiplier...  4 is closer to cheddar than camembert.  Has worked well for me. I also do not cut and stir the curd...I scoop it out with a ladle straight into the forms...which is traditional from what I understand and according to a video I saw of the process.

Offline george (MaryJ)

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2013, 05:13:56 AM »
I don't think Boofer's talking about cams in his examples?  References I see are Taleggio and those adorable little Reblochon cheese bellies.   :)  So the 4X/5X would apply to those, not cams, for those specific experiences/makes of his.

Boofer, whack me upside de head if I'm wrong.   ;D
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Tomme de Fleurette
« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2013, 08:10:36 AM »
I don't think Boofer's talking about cams in his examples?  References I see are Taleggio and those adorable little Reblochon cheese bellies.   :)  So the 4X/5X would apply to those, not cams, for those specific experiences/makes of his.

Boofer, whack me upside de head if I'm wrong.   ;D
Thank you for clarifying that, george. Spot on! :)

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