Author Topic: Cold Smoker  (Read 2454 times)

Offline Al Lewis

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Cold Smoker
« on: February 09, 2013, 01:28:19 PM »
I'm thinking about buying one of these and wondered if anyone had any experiences with them.  Went and looked at it yesterday and the cabinet and door are all double walled and insulated.  First appearance was very good.  I plan on using it as a cold smoker, it goes down to 100F, for cheeses and meats.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_416468-58355-20070513_4294703217__?productId=4459487&Ns=p_product_avg_rating|1&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNs%3Dp_product_avg_rating%7C1&facetInfo=


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Offline H-K-J

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2013, 01:34:06 PM »
I was looking at this on line yesterday and want to go down to Sportsman's warehouse to see it up close
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Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2013, 02:05:36 PM »
It looks really nice H-K-J.  All double wall insulated door with heat proof weather stripping.  The handle on the side is to put more wood in.  I like the electric part because it just gives you the flavor of the wood smoke.  Don't have to spend all of your time tending it either.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2013, 02:56:49 PM »
I have a similar electric smoker, but it's worthless for cheese. Yes, it will go down to 100F, but at low temps it will produce very little (if any) smoke. I use a little gizmo called a smoke pistol. You can feed a stream of cold smoke anywhere you want. An old BBQ grill, or even a Rubbermaid container works great. There are many other references throughout the forum for simple effective techniques.
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Offline H-K-J

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2013, 03:05:16 PM »
Good point Sailor, I have a Little Chief and was trying to figure out ways to regulate smoke and heat.
I did find this if that is what you were referring to
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Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2013, 03:21:15 PM »
Great idea but I could just buy the cartridges and use those without the $85.00 fan.  Besides, that's not going to smoke two hams and 10 pounds of bacon. LOL  Jury's still out on this one but I am liking this MasterForge.

Offline H-K-J

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2013, 04:24:08 PM »
I'm thinkin the smoke pistol would work alright in my little chief, the pistol is $54.95, three smoke pellets are $7.95
I do believe you are right about the hams-n-bacon ;)
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Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2013, 06:55:27 PM »
Well it's here now.  One way or the other I'm smoking something!!  LOL

Offline shotski

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2013, 09:16:07 PM »

Offline shotski

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2013, 09:37:38 AM »
Cold smoking is done between 80 - 100 degrees which really nither of these smokers will do with out some fudging. 

http://ezinearticles.com/?What-Exactly-is-Cold-Smoking?&id=108679

If you go down to the highlighted " Bradly Smoker" in the article it will give you some Ideas on how to fudge it. The nice thing about the Bradly is that there is a smoke element and a heater element. When cold smoking I just use the smoke element with ice.


http://www.smoker-cooking.com/coldsmokedsalmon.html


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Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2013, 09:58:50 AM »
We'll see how this one works out.  I looked at the Bradly prior to buying this one however no one around here had any and I was concerned about being limited to their wood tablets for a smoke source.  Like the Smoke Pistol, that Sailor recommended, you cannot simply use good ole wood chips.  I'm always wary of any product that makes me rely on their continued business to keep something running.  With regards to the temperatures, I'll experiment with this ones side vent to see what temps I can get.  The readout goes down to 56F, probably lower but that's what it read on my back deck yesterday, so I can do a host of things to control temperature.  Believe me this isn't my first rodeo on smokers.  ;)
« Last Edit: February 10, 2013, 10:23:54 AM by Al Lewis »

Offline shotski

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2013, 10:59:47 AM »
"Believe me this isn't my first rodeo on smokers."

I saw the picture you posted of the smoker with the smoke chamber on the side. You are right about needing to purchase the Bradly pucks but I have had some success with small chips and dust. 

Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2013, 11:33:30 AM »
I'm sure that in a pinch you could readily make your own biscuits with a arbor press and a make shift form.  Not sure what the diameter of them is but a short piece of fence pipe might work perfectly.  You could custom mix your wood.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2013, 02:07:54 AM »
Gentleman - I suggest lighting just a few pieces of charcoal (I use 4 or 5), placing a few small chunks of wood on top and letting it smolder for a nice cold smoke. If you cut your own wood, slice the limbs into discs about 2 inches thick and break away pieces as needed. This will burn slower and cooler and smolder nicely. Once you get the coals burning just add a few more as they burn down so they light the next ones. Works great even for cheese BUT you do need a wood pan. On an electric try putting a pan over the heating elements and then a cast iron trivet or someting inside that to burn the coals on so you don't gum up the works. Anything that can hold a few hot briquettes safely can be used for a cold smoker.

Offline Brie

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Re: Cold Smoker
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2013, 09:44:37 PM »
I have used both the "Smoking Gun" and the Bradley and the Bradley rocks! I love the briquettes and the fact that they have so many flavors--pecan, hickory, cherry, apple--and more! More than an hour is too much! I smoked a gouda in pecan and a provolone in cherry. I think smoking is best on young cheese, as it adds to the taste of a young cheese making it more complex--the older cheese does that on its own--thoughts?
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.