Author Topic: FLAV 43  (Read 612 times)

Offline NimbinValleyDairy

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FLAV 43
« on: February 12, 2013, 12:30:28 AM »
Does anyone have any experience with Danisco's FLAV 43.  It is Pc. acidilactici and is meant to impart sweet and savoury notes, as well as reducing bitterness.

NV.


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: FLAV 43
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2013, 01:16:48 AM »
You have to be careful with pediocin production, as it inhibits some meso strains. But generally, pediococci are good for improving aroma and flavor. They don't do too much for proteolysis. If you're interested in a new product or some flavor differentiation, I would actually try one of the sausage fermentation products like one of the Bactoferms that has Pc pentosaceus along with acidilacti. Flav 43 would work, too, but, different.

One classic application is for the softer, fast ripening tomme. For that with your goats, you could do something like

- SLABs of single strain cremoris (60%), 10-15% Leuconostoc, and a slow going l lactis lactis for the rerst. 1.0-1.2% total SLAB. and 0.4% bactoferm (all bulk equivalent). Do a 2 hour ripen at 86F, set at 6.4
- Regular tomme make, target 40% MFFB, 3x floc, 5 mm curd
- drain whey to be just above the curd... should be somewhere around 35-50% of milk volume after a 15 mins stir (after 5 min heal, standard stuff)
- take mildly warm wash water (95F) and wash 15%. Do it all at once, it's fine.
- Stir until final moisture target and let it settle to the bottom. Start checking pH.
- Drain once you hit 6.2-6.25. will plop out all at once, press right away to fuse into final shape.
- brine 5.4

This one will tend to grow mold, so you can do something interesting with the rind and sell at 75 days. If you really want to complete the whole traditional meat fermentation approach, spray with p nalgiovense and pat it down. Makes for a pretty interesting cheese, sells nicely, and will be rather different than the other adjuncted tomme you make.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2013, 11:19:17 AM by linuxboy »
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Offline Tiarella

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Re: FLAV 43
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2013, 10:03:44 AM »
Pav,  what do you mean by your line of instructions about washing?  The one that mentions "wash15% all at once is fine"? 

Thanks, K

Offline linuxboy

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Re: FLAV 43
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2013, 10:08:01 AM »
15% of milk volume. not added in stages because water is not hot
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Offline Tiarella

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Re: FLAV 43
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2013, 11:07:58 AM »
Okay, so all the whey is drained and 15% of the original milk volume  (or drained whey volume?) is added back in, in the form of warm water?  doesn't that leave mostly curd and almost no liquid?  I'm having trouble picturing it.  (and I think I've been doing washed curd cheeses incorrectly although fully enjoying the outcome)  So then, there's curds in that small amount of wash water and once pH hits target you drain it sounds like. 


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: FLAV 43
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2013, 11:16:53 AM »
Quote
all the whey is drained and 15% of the original milk volume  (or drained whey volume?) is added back in, in the form of warm water?  doesn't that leave mostly curd and almost no liquid?
Sorry, I should have clarified. Drain until whey line is just above the curd. It's not a full drain. And 15 mins isn't a full stir cycle (that should be more like 30-40 mins), the curds will have whey inside still.

This isn't a normal washed curd cheese, this is not a standard approach. It's a manipulated make I engineered for a very specific mouthfeel and flavor profile. The reason for draining most of the whey is I'm trying to leach a little more calcium from the bonds, just like is done with the super long ripening times and overnight holds with slow starters. It's actually a throwback to the pH curves of old-timey Spanish cheese. This started as a garrotxa clone.

You got the idea, though... reduce the whey amount, replace with water.
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