Author Topic: Lipase smell  (Read 632 times)

Offline tal_d1

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Lipase smell
« on: March 05, 2013, 05:44:51 AM »
I made Parmesan last week from 16L of fresh milk and
I add 1/4 tsp calf lipase that I bought 2 month ago. The cheese has a strange (bad) smell
And also the Ricota which I made from the whey has a very bad taste and
I throw it to the garbage.
Is this smell is typical and will be gone with the long aging or the
Parmesan is gone ?


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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Lipase smell
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2013, 07:32:33 AM »
Can you describe the smell?  A bad smell is very relative...what is bad for one person can be good to another.

Does it smell like spoiled meat? Like mushrooms? Like dirty feet? Like moist dirt?

Offline tal_d1

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Re: Lipase smell
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2013, 09:41:05 AM »
Hi bbracken677, maybe bad is not the right word but i don't like
it so much. I now remember that
when i made Feta last year with Lipase is has the same smell but not so
strong like with this Parmesan make. Because the taste of the Ricotta i
fill a little afraid that this taste will be in the aged Parmesan.
Most of the time i put only 1/8 tsp for 16L so maybe the 1/4 tsp i put
this time is too much (for me).

Offline BobE102330

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Re: Lipase smell
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2013, 09:56:37 AM »
I believe it was Sailor con Queso who said with lipase less is more.  Use just a little to accent the flavor rather than drive the flavor.  If you have raw milk, I'd skip the lipase all together for a Parmesan. Especially since you don't seem to like the flavor.  I've got a Parm that's 2 weeks old without lipase that's already smelling great.

Age yours out anyway.  Others may like the sharpness that the lipase gives it. 

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Lipase smell
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2013, 11:25:32 AM »
Hi tal_d1,

Lipase does produce a distinct flavour.  I've made a few montasio's, where I used 1/4 tsp for a 10 L make (which was following a recipe).  Turns out, that's probably too much for a table cheese and in the future I would cut it back quite a bit.  However, as a grating cheese, it's fantastic!  So, age your parm out for a year or more, and then use it grated over pasta, etc.  I think you'll find it is really good that way. 

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.


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Online Tomer1

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Re: Lipase smell
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2013, 05:55:07 PM »
As your ricotta tasted funky , the lipase I think is not to blame.   
the lipolysis takes time, and you would not notice the distinct aroma in a fresh cheese. also, its heat sensitive and would likely be destroyed by the 90c heat riccota requires.

Perhaps the milk was contaminated before the make and some off flavors were developed during the make.   maybe some milk experts can chip in with their expertise.
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Offline tal_d1

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Re: Lipase smell
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2013, 05:43:44 AM »
I made some reading and found that Lipase has immediate taste and smell.(beside the taste that
develop with aging).

I decided to use this cheese for learning and i cut it.
When i cut it with knife the paste is smooth and when
i cut with hand (it was quite hard to do it) it is granulated as
you can see at the picture.
The paste is quite elastic, something like Gruyere.
about the make:
16L partly skimmed fresh raw milk.
1/8 tsp LH100 + 1/8 tsp TA061 + 1/4 tsp calf lipase.
1/4 tsp calcium 30%.
3/4 tsp calf rennet.
floc time 10 minute and cut after 20 to 5mm size.
hit to 52C over 60 minute.
curds size before cut are very small about 3mm and dry but not too much.



Tomorrow i am going to make a new one and will reduce lipase
to less then 1/8 tsp.
I saw video about making this cheese in Italy and they cut the curds after
short set time while the curd are very soft and they cut to very
small size and handle the curd with roughness.
After the curds are cut they heat the curds to final temp at about 20 minute!
with fast stirring machine and at this point the curds are about 1/3 rice size.

« Last Edit: March 07, 2013, 05:54:20 AM by tal_d1 »

Offline Tiarella

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Re: Lipase smell
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2013, 06:34:05 AM »
I bet if you seal some pieces of this and age it out you will have a nice grating cheese!  I made a Parm style and the lipase smell was strong (and hard to get off my hands) but it is a VERY nice grating cheese!  Tasty!