Author Topic: Hushallsost?  (Read 626 times)

Offline brentphx

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Hushallsost?
« on: March 09, 2013, 10:52:00 AM »
I was on a flight yesterday, the person seated next to me was bringing home a half wheel of Hushallsost from a small town in Ga. She said it was really good, so much so that she was carrying some home! I searched but cannot find a recipe anywhere. It was semi-soft, small air bubbles, and smelled good... Although I didn't make her open it for a taste test :)  I've read up on it a bit, it's only a 60 day ripening time... Thought I might try making a wheel...but I can't find a recipe or which cultures to use! Anyone seen a recipe for this one??


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Offline Mike Richards

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Re: Hushallsost?
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2013, 01:21:29 PM »
wikipedia says it's close to port-salut: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hush%C3%A5llsost
If only I could make cheese as well as I grow a mustache...

Offline Michael S

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Re: Hushallsost?
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2013, 02:27:27 AM »
Hushållsost is not any cheese you offer to your friends for the taste. It is normally found as a spread for breakfast on a regular Monday ;) It is inexpensive and has hardly any flavor.

Here is a picture of my cave/fridge.

To the left is 10 lbs of really cheap Gouda that I will cold smoke when the weather permits. In the middle lies the Haloumi in brine, fresh from yesterday :) and to the right 6 lbs of port salut as I try to agine, I'm guessing that they are ready for Christmas.

It is not uncommon here in Sweden to buy a few pieces of hushållsost and store them in a year or so in the fridge, to develop better flavor and texture. I would guess that if you make a port salut and taste of it after one or two months of aging, you are probably close to the taste of a Hushållsost.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 04:50:26 AM by Michael S »

Offline Boofer

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Re: Hushallsost?
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2013, 09:05:23 AM »
Well that's confusing. ???

Hushallsost is described as a semi-hard cheese with 26% fat.
Port Salut (Trappist cheese) is described as a semi-soft cheese with 72% fat.

The Port Salut I have tasted has been semi-soft, ripening to oozy, and has been quite tasty.

-Boofer-
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Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline Michael S

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Re: Hushallsost?
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2013, 12:50:22 PM »
I think there is a big difference between Port Salut in Sweden and America.
Here in Sweden, it counts as a cheese with not so developed flavor.

Sorry to say it, but common people in Sweden want cheese with no taste at all. The cheaper, the better.
Hushållsost normally costs 4.5 $ / lbs, Port Salut is a bit more expensive, maybe $ 6 / lbs and Västerbotten cost from $ 10 / lbs.

When you go to the store there is a lot of hushållsost to buy  ;)
So by agine the Port Salut or hushållsost yourself, you get a cheese that taste good for a low price.


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