Author Topic: New member and my first caerphilly  (Read 754 times)

Offline nogoer

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New member and my first caerphilly
« on: January 23, 2013, 08:11:52 AM »
Just in case you hadn't seen my post in the intro forum, i've made cheeses before and recently back into the action. Done a couple cheddars but i didn't think they aged properly. Found about caerphilly and all it's cheddar like traits but none of the wait time...yes i'm one of those instant gratification types...so i bought Tim Smith's book and away i went.

Pictures are the result after a few turns after removing from the press last night. I was surprised the recipe called for such a light final pressing of 15lbs for 16 hours and was concerned it might be a typo so i upped the pressure a few screw turns to around 20lbs or so. I just wanted to make sure i got a good knit but not so heavy i risked sealing in too much moisture.

As it sits it weighs 2lbs 6ozs, but i suspect after its done drying it will be closer to 2lbs. It does feel a bit spongy and it seems if i grab it too firmly it might break apart. The colby i did last week also felt this way but not as much and after a few days of air drying it firmed up. I'm just wondering if the increase in size 1lb vs 2lb recipe always results in a softer post-press cheese?


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Offline H-K-J

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2013, 09:41:00 AM »
Hi nogoer,

There is a lot of thread's on the forum that address a Caerphilly cheese
Jeffhamm placed this doc on the forum,
if you read it there is a lot of leeway and some very high pressures used for this cheese.
the general thought here is, a Caerphilly is a very forgiving cheese so just go for it ;) and have fun to ;D
act as if it were impossible to fail.

Online JeffHamm

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2013, 02:15:43 PM »
The important thing is to get a good external knit, which you seem to have.  I see a few cracks/lines, but nothing major, so mold won't, or shouldn't, be a problem.  You can increase the pressure without harm on this, mostly to get rid of any mechanical openings in the internal paste.  I don't worry too much about them.  If you can keep the curds warm when you press for the first couple hours while pressing and you should be fine (search for "pressing in the pot").  Let it air dry at room temp for 4 or 5 days, and it will lose moisture and firm up.  It may start to grow a bit of geo in a couple weeks (white mold), but that's ok, just give it a brush down.  You can wash it with brine if you want, but a light dusting of geo is ok. 

Don't forget to post a photo when you cut it, and provide a taste report!  Anyway, a cheese to you for a fine looking result.

- Jeff
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Offline nogoer

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2013, 07:29:48 AM »
Thanks everyone for checking in. The cheese has been drying quite well, albeit slightly malformed. I should have done more flipping during the first few hours as its become more of a bell shape. Thats just a cosmetic thing though so im not concerned. What i have discovered though is my mold works great for 1lb cheeses but 2lbs it's just an odd shape for cutting. I'll probably just cut it in half and vac seal one half while we eat the other.

Online JeffHamm

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2013, 02:08:54 PM »
Hmm, for cutting, it might work well to slice one end off (and keep that as a "cap" when you store it).  Then cut a disk out, and cut that into wedges, like an orange slice.  If you want slices for a sandwhich, then you can shave off the top surface of the disk. 

However, I would suggest finding a larger mold, around the 6 inch diameter mark for 2lbs makes.    That's what I have and it seems to result in a good form.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.


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Offline BobE102330

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2013, 02:56:22 PM »
I'm not an expert, but if you were shooting for 2 pounds and ended up at nearly 2.5 out of the press and the cheese feels soft you probably have too much moisture.  I've been surprised by the variation in curd volume I get using the same quantity of milk.  Do you use the flocculation method to determine cutting time?  A larger floc multiplier results in a moister cheese.  Also ensure that your cooking time is adequate and you stir vigorously enough towards the end to expel the right amount of whey before you hit the press. 

The form factor looks about right for a typical 2 pound cheese mold to me.  I agree, that seems like an odd shape but from what I have read here, the ~4" height is important for aging.  That led me to go with a larger mold and make 4 gallon batches so the proportions are more aesthetically pleasing.

A wetter cheese should still be tasty, but won't age as long as a proper moisture content cheese would. 

Offline nogoer

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2013, 08:37:46 AM »
I do not use any specific method as of yet. I am still finding my bearings and developing my experience on the process itself. A week prior to the caerphilly i made a 1lb colby which also had the spongy feel to it, but after 5 days of air drying it completely firmed up and developed a nice rind. The caerphilly is now in the cave aging as i was concerned with leaving it out for too long because its unwaxed. The rind seems to be doing good and it's dry to the touch all around. After 5 days drying it has firmed up a fair amount and enough for me not to be concerned that it will be too moist in the middle. I may pull it out and let it air dry some if it seems to be getting damp on the top/bottom again.

Offline Tiarella

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2013, 10:18:56 AM »
Do you brine your cheeses after pressing?  That usually firms and tightens them up.  I bet this cheese will taste fine but also wonder at too much moisture.  Do post updates!   :)

Offline nogoer

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2013, 11:13:03 AM »
Finally cut into the cheese this past weekend. Cheese was covered with a fluffy white mold as well as blue molds. It's this part of cheesemaking that always has me a bit nervous. Molds can be harmful and i always worry about eating moldy cheese. The pictures show the result of scraping off most of the mold. I know i was a bit moist after pressing but the inside was ok by this point. Cheese was crumbly and slightly moist and creamy. Had that sharp/bitter caerphilly taste i expected after having tried store bought a month ago.

I know the blue mold isn't harmful, but the white fluff has me concerned as well as the yellowing uncovered after scraping off the mold. Taste is fine, but is that white mold dangerous? Cave was around 85% and 55 +- 3 the whole time.

Offline bbracken677

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2013, 11:31:58 AM »
More than likely the white mold is either geo or PC, both of which are encouraged to grow on certain cheeses and are common invaders with a naturally wild rind.  I know what you mean though...I typically cut the rind off of pieces I am eating when they look like that. I make camemberts, which have the geo and PC white fluff and never eat the rinds, just the gooey paste on the inside : )


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Online JeffHamm

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2013, 11:34:50 AM »
Hi,

The moulds are fine.  Caerphilly will often develop a bit of geo, which is a white mould.  Next time, stir a bit longer, or make sure you change direction more often as this helps create collisions which expells the whey.  Leave it at room temp for 3 to 5 days to dry the surface well.  Finally, if you keep a soft nail brush in your cave, just give it a brush if you are getting a bit of mould devleopment.  This will help keep it in check, without removing it completely.  Then, you'll start to get a decent natural rind that helps protect the cheese.  You'll probably want to remove it, but it's not harmful to have it on. 

Your result sounds, and looks, spot on, so a cheese to you for your success.

- Jeff
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Offline nogoer

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Re: New member and my first caerphilly
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2013, 11:48:08 AM »
Thanks! The white mold did look and touch similar to brie mold, although brie mold is usually  more dense.

The outside does look like it started to get a very nice dry rind going, but i started running into issues with my wine cooler running too cold. Even though its set at 55 it appears to stay running and chilling down to 50 with the basement being in the mid 50s. I ended up just turning it off which may have created such a nice environment for the mold growth. When it starts warming up it hopefully will hold temp better so i can leave it on. If not i'll have to move my temp controller over from the homebrew fermentor to the cheese cave. Warmer months it sits idle because the basement gets to a perfect 68F for ale fermenting.