Author Topic: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?  (Read 4596 times)

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #45 on: April 18, 2013, 12:00:21 AM »
Quote
get back control over your army of rebel microbes.
I have this vision of millions of microflora standing up... "I'm Spartacus!"
"No, I'm Spartacus!"
No, I am Spartacus!

Seriously you guys, someone called me "The cheese whisperer" a few months ago and while I was humbled by that, not only did I feel I can never deliver, but I also thought that this title is already used for Willi Schmidt, Rolf Beeler and Hervé MonS and I am not nearly at their class...
But Cheese Spartacus will do!


I take the bag out of the freezer, take what I need quickly, and re-vacuum seal the bag to suck out the moisture. They have been staying fairly dry and unclumped that way. Still, every time I open the vacuum seal and expose them to moister air over the years, there has to be some degradation in viability.
Well, one of the easy tricks to do this is to take the bag out of the freezer 30-60 minutes before you need to use it. Let it all get to room temperature inside the dry environment of your vacuum so there is no moisture (it's all on the outside of the bag). Now open the bag, doze, vacuum and back to the freezer it goes. If you noticed, this is what Danisco recommends in their instructions, of course referring to the original factory-sealed sachet with the protective dry nitrogen-flushed atmosphere inside which is better than any of our vacuums... But if you strongly believe that your vacuum is dry than do it. By the time you open it the powder will be at room temperature and without the thermal shock there will be no condensation (unless of course you live in a Turkish bathhouse). Something to think about. May improve the longevity of your cultures.

I stopped washing almost two weeks ago because the rind appeared to be softening too much and I was trying to dry it out a bit. I would agree that the slickeriness is mocasse. I've seen that before. I just expected it to fade by now, the Geo to dry a bit and head towards grittiness, and for the linens to come on a bit more.

I'll resume washing tomorrow morning with my SR3 & 3% brine. That should help correct some things.
Actually, you are hitting my point about taking back control: Do the opposite and get proactive on it. Don't let the geo run wild. Your washing is exactly what will keep it geo in check. It will develop the B.Linen and wipe some of that geo off. It will dry and thin out the rind. Reduce humidity and temperature and wash, wash, wash. In fact, before you continue your wash routine, I suggest to toss a bit of coarse salt on the surface, then rub it in with the rag/brush soaked with your morge. Then rub it once more with a demp cloth to get the exces liquid out and leave it only moist but not wet.  (don't worry about salting, at this point your cheese is not moist enough for osmosis so it won't make the cheese overly salty, only the rind). The salt's abrasiveness will dig in the geo, it will slow it down and it will give you stronger, firmer, drier rind with good elasticity. You need to get the B.Linen growing as fast as possible at this point because this is what will make the main proteolysis from now on, hence giving you that Camembert-like texture (in Camembert the PC does it)

Then I'm wondering about the target ripening date range.... Everything points to 4-6 weeks ripening. Wednesday marks five weeks. :P  I'm not in a rush...this needs to be ripe before I cut into it.
Get out that cheese trier! This cheese will also be good if the center is not ripe all the way.  (personal taste though...)

Awesome pics!  Beauty form and impressions on your rind!
Thank you! Yes, I like these rinds that look like tuffed pillows and they crack when bent to reveal some oozing interior. Can't explain why I find them appetizing. I just do...


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Offline Boofer

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #46 on: April 18, 2013, 09:33:03 AM »
Seriously you guys, someone called me "The cheese whisperer" a few months ago
I didn't mean to imply that I felt I was Spartacus, I was merely echoing the hundreds/thousands of them way back who purportedly voiced that.

Actually, you are hitting my point about taking back control: Do the opposite and get proactive on it. Don't let the geo run wild. Your washing is exactly what will keep it geo in check. It will develop the B.Linen and wipe some of that geo off. It will dry and thin out the rind. Reduce humidity and temperature and wash, wash, wash. In fact, before you continue your wash routine, I suggest to toss a bit of coarse salt on the surface, then rub it in with the rag/brush soaked with your morge. Then rub it once more with a demp cloth to get the exces liquid out and leave it only moist but not wet.  (don't worry about salting, at this point your cheese is not moist enough for osmosis so it won't make the cheese overly salty, only the rind). The salt's abrasiveness will dig in the geo, it will slow it down and it will give you stronger, firmer, drier rind with good elasticity. You need to get the B.Linen growing as fast as possible at this point because this is what will make the main proteolysis from now on, hence giving you that Camembert-like texture (in Camembert the PC does it)
So how can you wash these cheeses with the delicate rind without totally destroying the cheese?

I like these rinds that look like tuffed pillows and they crack when bent to reveal some oozing interior.
Yes, they would crack and be an oozy mess. I wouldn't think that was a condition to be desired.

I have been giving them more time to air out and the minicave lid was cracked a couple weeks ago. I began misting with SR3 & brine, but I am reluctant to go full-bore and resume an aggressive washing regimen as you suggest. Salting seems like it could help so I will do that.

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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #47 on: April 18, 2013, 11:30:31 AM »
Quote
I'll do 40 "Hail Cheeses" to show penitence.
Ah, just in time for morning mass. Thought I missed it.

Hail Cheeses, full of grace
The mold is with thee
Blessed art thou among fermented treats,
And blessed is the fruit of thy vat, the tomme
Holy Cheeses, mother of umami and flavor
Get into my belly, now and at the hour of our death
Amen

Caseus vobiscum
« Last Edit: April 19, 2013, 11:55:21 AM by linuxboy »
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline george (MaryJ)

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #48 on: April 19, 2013, 06:07:32 AM »
Hail Cheeses, full of grace
The mold is with thee
Blessed art though among fermented treats,
And blessed is the fruit of thy vat, the tomme
Holy Cheeses, mother of umami and flavor
Get into my belly, now and at the hour of our death
Amen

Caseus vobiscum
Oh boy.  Took me a while to get back on my chair to type this, after I fell off it laughing.

I wonder if I could get someone to needlepoint this?  Would make a fine addition to any wall, dontcha think?   >:D
If I have to be a grownup, can I at least be telekinetic too?

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #49 on: April 22, 2013, 09:30:22 PM »
It's a winning shirt for the next Cheesemonger Invitational. Better than their 'Raw Milk Rockstar' and 'Straight outa' Comté'.


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Offline zvisaar

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #50 on: April 24, 2013, 02:41:11 AM »
hi. just a simple question  the brook whipping cream whats the percentage of fat in that cream ???


Offline Boofer

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #51 on: April 25, 2013, 12:51:08 AM »
hi. just a simple question  the brook whipping cream whats the percentage of fat in that cream ???
Direct from the the Twin Brooks Creamery folks: 40-41%

We're at the 6 week point. Still working the rind and trying to see some linens. I can't be sure whether what I'm seeing is linens or just the drier rind color, like on the corners.  :-\

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Offline Tiarella

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #52 on: April 25, 2013, 06:30:14 AM »
Hi Boofer!  looks like linens to me.  nice cheeses! 

Offline Boofer

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #53 on: May 07, 2013, 06:25:13 PM »
Tomorrow marks week eight in this cheese's life. I decided to go ahead and cut today.

I was a little concerned that the thicker form factor would result in a chalky core. Not a problem at week 8. Very rich and creamy. Good flavor and level of salt. Although the paste should have been more similar to very soft taffy, this is more than acceptable for a freshman effort. As I said, reducing the thickness and eliminating the added cream should result in a cheese more true to style.

Did I mention that this was very rich? :P  ;)

After quartering the squares, I vacuum-sealed the quarters and put them into the cold fridge.

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Offline Boofer

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #54 on: May 10, 2013, 01:40:49 AM »
I sampled this after it had been out at room temperature for a while and what do you know...it was soft, spreadable, and with a texture very much like soft taffy. Nice.  :)

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Online JeffHamm

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #55 on: May 10, 2013, 03:13:19 PM »
Very nice result again Boofer!  A cheese to you for such a nice outcome.  So, will you be making this again?

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline bbracken677

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #56 on: May 10, 2013, 03:57:27 PM »
I sampled this after it had been out at room temperature for a while and what do you know...it was soft, spreadable, and with a texture very much like soft taffy. Nice.  :)

-Boofer-

I love cheese with those qualities... you didnt mention the flavor though. How was that?

Tossing another cheese on your pile cause now I want to make one!!   >:D

Offline Boofer

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #57 on: May 11, 2013, 05:10:41 PM »
I sampled this after it had been out at room temperature for a while and what do you know...it was soft, spreadable, and with a texture very much like soft taffy. Nice.  :)

-Boofer-


I love cheese with those qualities... you didnt mention the flavor though. How was that?

Tossing another cheese on your pile cause now I want to make one!!   >:D
I took a wedge out early this morning along with a wedge of my Saint Paulin. Several hours later, when they were both sufficiently at ambient temperature, I enjoyed them with some fresh no-knead bread and fruit (apple slices and orange & sweet pink grapefruit sections). Wow! Nice pairing of all of that. The Pont l'Eveque was sliceable and yet spreadable. The taste was delicately creamy and, when I closed my eyes, I thought I had a vision of an alpine hillside complete with loving cow.  ;)

Thanks for the cheeses guys. Yes, I would make this again. I didn't really have a recipe to start with, but this turned out wonderfully anyway. I even enjoy the rind. The entire cheese is an amazement. I would adjust the recipe to eliminate the added cream...it slows down ripening (as did the slightly thicker form factor). The salt content is dead-on. There was no encroachment by foreign invaders. There also was little visible linens...perhaps I was just a little too sparing in the SR3 dosage, but then again, the rind is perfectly edible. Maybe more linens would have given reason to remove the rind. :P

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Offline hoeklijn

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #58 on: May 12, 2013, 09:46:51 AM »
Congrats and a cheese for this result! Excellent looking cheese again!
- Herman -

Offline Boofer

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Re: Pont-l'Évêque . . . magnifique?
« Reply #59 on: May 31, 2013, 12:44:23 AM »
Tonight the planets seemed to align in my kitchen. I had an unopened bottle of Vouvray wine, some baguette, and the makings for Tartiflette. Following Yoav's link for a recipe, I gave it my best effort.

No, I didn't have Reblochon, but I had decided that this cheese might serve well in its place.

There are a large number of recipes for tartiflette. Some don't add the crème fraiche, some vary the type of potatoes, some don't agree on how to slice the cheese and place it on top of the dish. Some reduce the wine while others, such as this recipe, just pour the wine onto the dish. I found that this makes a pretty wet dish. The wine should at least be partially reduced. The crème fraiche should be mixed with the wine to help it cover the potatoes more evenly. This recipe didn't mention any seasonings, even salt & pepper, but some recipes call for thyme.

The end result was a rich "comfort food" dish complemented by a simple green salad, the Vouvray, and the baguette. The Pont l'Eveque seemed to meld fairly well in the dish. It would certainly be more at home on a cold blustery, winter evening. I would repeat the effort making a few adjustments...maybe even using Reblochon, if I have it available.

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