Author Topic: Eppoisses  (Read 785 times)

Offline Brie

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Eppoisses
« on: April 18, 2013, 08:31:21 PM »
Finally got around to making my first Eppoisses. Used Mary Karlin's recipe and alternated salt brine and Grappa for wash. I now realize how it got the name of 'stinkiest cheese'.
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.


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Offline Boofer

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Re: Eppoisses
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2013, 08:01:05 AM »
Besides stinky, how does it taste?

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Offline Salilah

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Re: Eppoisses
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2013, 01:33:51 PM »
Finally got around to making my first Eppoisses. Used Mary Karlin's recipe and alternated salt brine and Grappa for wash. I now realize how it got the name of 'stinkiest cheese'.

Well, I used to be told that when folks made wine, they pressed the grapes and left behind the skin, pips and general bits
Then they pressed all the leftovers to make Grappa!
So what do you expect?  :)

Nice looking cheese - how does it taste?

Offline Brie

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Re: Eppoisses
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2013, 10:46:26 PM »
I actually think I prefer Muenster--the Grappa inclusion is interesting; yet definitely adds to b.linen--think it may be better as an ingredient in a dish--very strong! I enjoy the process, above all--the chemistry, the olfactory, the taste on the tongue, the first cut..you all know what I mean!  I will be ready to cut my Tallegio in a few weeks, along with a Lemon/Vodka washed goat cheese that should be interesting.
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.

Offline Antita

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Re: Eppoisses
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2013, 10:24:05 PM »
Is Grappa also used for washing Langres (similar to Epoisses)? I tried some Langres recently, and was told that it was washed in Champagne, however my research so far (limited) seem to indicate that Marc de Champagne (Brandy?) or Grappa is used, not Champagne.
Your Epoisses cheese looks great :)
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curd nerd

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Re: Eppoisses
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2013, 12:13:51 AM »
ANTITA,,,,,,,,,you are spot on , marc de champagne and grappa are pretty much the same thing , both fermented from the

second pressing of grape skins,,,,,, a touch "rough" on the palate but absolutely ideal for rind washing

it doesn't matter if red or white grape skins are pressed as the fermented liquid  under pot distillation and / or  column

rectification will render the yield colourless,,,,,i spent some 47 years on and off up around your way , mostly asleep in beverage

labs,,,,,,,,,,good luck , many regards ,brian


Offline iratherfly

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Re: Eppoisses
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2013, 09:34:20 PM »
Langres is not washed in Champagne but rather a simple morge of light brine and geo.  The color on Langres comes from Annatto in the wash.  Langres however has a dimple at the top of the cheese (a sort of crevice or hollow if you will) that is meant to be filled with champagne as you pour champagne over the cheese before consuming.  Champagne of course comes from the same geographical area so that explains it... but it's a simple semi-lactic "delice" style cheese, not much different from Epoisses before washing (and of course different form factor).

Offline Antita

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Re: Eppoisses
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2013, 09:42:47 PM »
How does that explain the "champagne" taste that you get with the cheese (assuming that it hasn't been served with champagne poured over/ into it)? Thanks for your help, it's getting a little confusing!
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Offline iratherfly

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Re: Eppoisses
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2013, 07:42:00 PM »
I personally don't think that it tastes like champagne, but being a product based on the terroir of the same region, it is certainly possible that this is the results of having some of the same elements that produce flavor compound in the region as well as the the historical link that provides foods which are compatible with the drinks of the same people and region