Author Topic: Farmhouse Cheddar  (Read 1291 times)

Offline Jim & Rose

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Farmhouse Cheddar
« on: March 30, 2013, 09:43:53 AM »
We've been making mozzarella, ricotta and queso blanco type cheeses several years.  Our first effort at a harder cheese was a total failure an I'm not sure why.  I recently learned about a farm very close to my home that is selling raw cow and goat milk, so I've run out of excuses not to make more cheese. 3 gallons of milk and one pint of heavy cream is in the recipe for the next two farmhouse cheddar attempts.  I found that my 15 gallon  kettle holds a 5 gallon kettle to make a fairly good double boiler and holds temps over an hour or so pretty well. Here is some of the cut curd getting ready to drain and salt:

This wheel is drying right now:

This wheel was made onFebruary 10, very tasty, melts good, tastes great and is now half gone, 4lbs2ozs:


I'm looking forward to getting some sort of cheese cave and starting to play with real aged cheddar and some blue/stilton/roquefort type cheeses.

Offline Jim & Rose

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Re: Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2013, 11:11:07 AM »
We think the flavor of our second and third attempts at this farmhouse cheddar cheese is good.  We may toy with adding herbs to one in the near future.  I think we need to get some newer cultures and another recipe book.  Suggestions for a source or book?  Thanks!


Offline bbracken677

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Re: Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2013, 12:47:03 PM »
I would recommend "Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking" by Gianaclis Caldwell.

Offline Boofer

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Re: Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2013, 07:40:59 PM »
Suggestions for a source or book?
If you SEARCH you should be able to find references to culture sources. I know I've posted several from time to time.

Would you please edit your profile to include your location? Thanks.

-Boofer-
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Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline KTownCheese

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Re: Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2013, 08:21:42 PM »
Looking good!  Keep up the good work!

Offline jwalker

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Re: Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2013, 08:51:40 AM »
Quote
This wheel was made onFebruary 10, very tasty, melts good, tastes great and is now half gone, 4lbs2ozs:

So , you're saying that at 40 days your farmhouse cheddar is quite good?

You must be doing something right , mine tastes way to dry and acidic even at 8 weeks , I'm still aging four of them , think I will leave them for at least six months.

As for adding herbs , I have a 2 pound Gouda that I added dill to , I can't wait to try it.

Cheers , Jim.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.

Offline Jim & Rose

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Re: Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2013, 07:28:23 AM »
Thank You, I'll order this today.

I would recommend "Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking" by Gianaclis Caldwell.

Offline Jim & Rose

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Re: Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2013, 07:29:31 AM »
Sorry, I've never been to a forum where anyone cared what my location is.  I added a region of where this threads cheese was made.  We also make cheese at our condo's in FL and SC.

Suggestions for a source or book?
If you SEARCH you should be able to find references to culture sources. I know I've posted several from time to time.

Would you please edit your profile to include your location? Thanks.

-Boofer-

Offline Jim & Rose

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Re: Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2013, 07:56:01 AM »
I wouldn't say quite good since I've never tried anyone's farmhouse cheddar.  I didn't expect a real cheddar flavor in less than three months, but this also doesn't use a cheddaring technique. The cheese has a mild but noticeable sharpness to it.  The recipe I used is here:
http://www.leeners.com/cheese/recipes/cheddar1.shtml

Quote
This wheel was made onFebruary 10, very tasty, melts good, tastes great and is now half gone, 4lbs2ozs:


So , you're saying that at 40 days your farmhouse cheddar is quite good?

You must be doing something right , mine tastes way to dry and acidic even at 8 weeks , I'm still aging four of them , think I will leave them for at least six months.

As for adding herbs , I have a 2 pound Gouda that I added dill to , I can't wait to try it.

Cheers , Jim.

Offline Jim & Rose

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Re: Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2013, 08:29:44 AM »
Our raw ingredients for the cheese above was this three gallons of raw cows milk and one pint of raw heavy cream. 

Offline bbracken677

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Re: Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2013, 08:57:12 AM »
Very Nice! It's awesome you have access to raw milk as many of our members do not. I can get it but it is pricey and a fair drive specially if during rush hour (both ways)....so most often I use H/P milk. It is amazing what a difference raw milk can make! 

 I have made a couple of caerphillys which are quick cheddar types. I have made regular cheddars and have tried them at various points in aging... a couple at 3 and 4 months which were decent but mild and kind of uninteresting. No surprise there...  I broke another open at 6 months which was much more cheddar like and comparable to a medium cheddar. I have a couple in the cave now that are going to go out a full year and have reached the midway point. I really like sharp cheddar and look forward to breaking those open.

Love making cheddars and those have been my focus for improving my process   :D