Author Topic: Peasant Gouda  (Read 1748 times)

Offline Boofer

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2013, 04:48:08 PM »
Sorry, Kathrin. Here you go.

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Offline Boofer

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #16 on: June 23, 2013, 08:56:48 AM »
Heading over to The Old Man's place (my soon-to-be-90 Dad) for cheese & crackers today and I figured a little Gouda would fit in nicely. He does love his cheese.

At 10 weeks old, this cheese is still young but it shows promise. The texture is right for the style. The flavor is a little subtle at this point, but still enjoyable. A little more age should improve the remaining two cheese bellies.

-Boofer-
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #17 on: June 25, 2013, 06:01:15 PM »
My Dad really seemed to enjoy this cheese. He raved about it several times. One time I could probably write off as feeding my ego, but more often and I'm pleased. He does love cheese. I left the rest of the cheese belly with him to enjoy. I have two more in the cave. ;)

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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #18 on: June 26, 2013, 12:36:54 AM »
A cheese to you for your wee belly!  That does look to be a very nice result, and it sounds like it's a hit with the old man.  At 90, he's sure to have had his fair share of cheese, so remember, Father knows best! :)  Will be interesting to compare the others as they age a bit more too.  But gouda is nice when young or aged. 

- Jeff
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Offline Tiarella

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #19 on: June 26, 2013, 05:29:13 AM »
Sounds like a wonderful make!  A cheese to you for being a generous cheese guy and having a ninety year old father!  I am glad you like the advantages of vacuum bagging but I admit I am saddened a bit at what it did to the shape of your cute little Gouda baby.   :'(.  That was such a cute little cheese.......sniff.


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Offline Boofer

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2013, 07:08:18 AM »
Hey, guys, thanks for the cheeses and your kind thoughts.

The bagging makes little crevices at the edges where the cheese likes to sneak in, rather like putting your fingers under the pillow at night. It doesn't affect the texture or flavor. If it were shrouded in wax, as per the style, there would be no edges, but then it might not have as immaculate protection as the vacuum bag affords. I seem to be making a few Goudas lately. If I were to have another go at it, I'd probably cream-coat and then pull out the wax and try that again. It's been quite some time since I waxed, but I do have a lot of it sitting unused.

-Boofer-
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #21 on: September 29, 2013, 10:18:34 AM »
Well here's a bit of a surprise...the cultures have continued to work to produce gas and develop eyes in this cheese at five months.

I cut this yesterday for a little lunch with the wife and The Old Man. The texture was spot on...flexible without being rubbery, with a nice clean taste very characteristic of true Gouda.

Dad enjoyed it and complimented on it.

It's interesting to see the changes a couple months of added affinage will make upon a cheese.

-Boofer-
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2013, 12:32:14 AM »
Looks very nice.  I've not had much luck with gouda.  My most recent make I used milk with too little fat (only about 1.5%), so not sure it will be quite right either.  Sigh.  Hope to get one even half as nice as this one at some point!

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Boofer

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #23 on: September 30, 2013, 08:16:57 AM »
Jeff, I have no doubt that it's just a matter of time before you immortalize Gouda as one of your specialties like all the rest of the cheese styles you've polished. 8)

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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #24 on: September 30, 2013, 03:13:28 PM »
I've had some turn out quite nicely (the caerphilly and my most recent staffordshire are hits), and two gouda's that I've aged a long time (well over a year) have been nice.  It has been the young goudas that haven't gone to plan.  But, I will soldier on and get it done one of these times.  There are enough hints on the board for me to work through.  Sooner or later I'll find the one I need.

- Jeff
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Offline High Altitude

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2013, 11:27:31 AM »
Those are great Boofer!  Indeed interesting what the extra aging time did to the second one you opened.  Maybe I'll try bagging one sometime too, but I like playing with wax when I can.  Would you cream coat it first because you fear mold or because you want it to still breath for a while before finally waxing (or both perhaps)?  Just curious.

Awesome that you share these with your Dad  ;D.  I just sent 3 variety halves to my folks (in their 70's and 80's) and I hope to still be sending them when they are in their 90's.

A big cheese to your cute little goudas!
Have some (homemade) wine with that cheese!

Offline Boofer

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Re: Peasant Gouda
« Reply #26 on: October 01, 2013, 07:01:44 PM »
Would you cream coat it first because you fear mold or because you want it to still breath for a while before finally waxing (or both perhaps)?  Just curious.
I wouldn't cream-coat the Goudas. I reserve that for my semi-hard and hard cheeses that have a fairly dry rind. I may have coated the Mellow Yellow Garlic Gouda, but it turned out pretty dry...that's what encouraged me to do it. Then I vacuum-sealed the coated cheese. Double protection. No breathing allowed. ;)

Currently I have Peasant Gouda #1, Peasant Gouda #2, and the Roasted Garlic Gouda that are all under vacuum-seal. I like the way that it holds the cheese in a more-or-less static condition. Plus which, I can see everywhere on the rind...in case an errant mold happened to get inside before sealing.

Hey, thanks for the cheese...the little buggers approve! :D

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.