Author Topic: Ph levels of distilled water in washed curd.  (Read 203 times)

Online qdog1955

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Ph levels of distilled water in washed curd.
« on: November 10, 2014, 04:03:41 PM »
  Having just received my first PH meter, I am still getting used to the ins and outs----one of the first things I noticed was that my distilled water was reading 4.9---thinking this a mistake---recalibrate---check ---still 4.9---I was thinking it should be close to neutral-----start the web research----find out that distilled water UNOPENED is about 6.7-6.8----but once opened to the air can be as low as 4.0---that's close to vinegar!!
  I have been using distilled water, thinking it is more sterile than tap water---but I have had more problems with washed curd makes then any other make.
  Is it possible that this distilled water has been contributing to over acidification----or other problems I am not aware of? Does anyone have some answers or experience with this?
Qdog


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Offline scasnerkay

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Re: Ph levels of distilled water in washed curd.
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2014, 06:22:36 PM »
I don't know about distilled water, but I always use tap water for washed curd cheese without a problem. I have municipal water, which sometimes includes treated well water, and it is safe to drink...  I do run it through a filter, just to remove some of the potential for chlorine residue (or whatever else it is they use to sterilize the water), because sometimes I can smell the chlorine scent.
The whey always goes up in pH after washing, so I do not bother to measure right away.
Also, I think I read somewhere that it is not a good idea to use distilled water with a pH meter. No idea why...
Susan

Offline Anonymous

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Re: Ph levels of distilled water in washed curd.
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2014, 06:32:26 PM »
Hi qdog,

Around 80% of the cheeses I make are washed curd cheeses. I've been making cheese since 2009 so I've a bit of experience with that particular family of cheese.

I only use distilled water for rennet and CaCl2 dilution. Tap water is just fine for washing curds. Most washed-curd cheeses (specifically Gouda, Jarslberg, havarti, etc...) only require 4 to 8 hours of pressing at no more than 4.5PSI. No overnight pressing for these cheeses! That has nothing to do with distilled water, it's just part of the washed curd process. My goudas taste great and only require 3.5 to 4 hours of pressing before reaching 5.4ph whey (or 5.2ph curd), they acidify real fast.

Short pressing times are quite normal for these cheeses and washing with regular tap water does a good job. No need to go distilled.


Offline Anonymous

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Re: Ph levels of distilled water in washed curd.
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2014, 06:35:36 PM »
Also, I think I read somewhere that it is not a good idea to use distilled water with a pH meter. No idea why...

Yes, using a PH meter on distilled water pulls the liquid component (can't remember what it is) out of the probe. NOT GOOD!

there's a reference from LINUXBOY on this somewhere on these boards

Online qdog1955

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Re: Ph levels of distilled water in washed curd.
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2014, 05:05:17 AM »
  Here's the reason I was using the distilled water-----about 10 or 15 years ago our water company made us their Guinea pigs and tried a new process of lining the water pipes with concrete--cheaper then replacing them----though it was an ingenious process---it did cause some problems----one, being a buildup of minerals on every thing----this became evident when I boiled my utensils to sterilize, they were covered in a white film. So I started using the distilled water. I do have a filter system, but it's a little slow and filters expensive. Guess I should go that route to avoid these minerals.
  Thanks for the response. I have seen the posts about distilled water and pH meters and the cleaning and care----glad it was there---cause they sure don't tell you that stuff in the instruction manual.
  Glad to see someone else is doing a lot of washed curds----I have had some problems with them, but I'm thinking it's more my selection of cultures and the quality of the milk, but wanted to rule out a potential problem.
 Once again, thanks.
And Susan, the last couple of makes----Ive been following your recipes, so I was wondering if you have BIG shoulders? ;)
Qdog


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Offline scasnerkay

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Re: Ph levels of distilled water in washed curd.
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2014, 08:55:46 PM »
qdog I still think of myself as a newbie... So it is a complement that you are willing to try my makes. Are you using the spreadsheet? If you do and you think of good changes to it let me know! It is my first try using spreadsheets.
Susan

Online qdog1955

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Re: Ph levels of distilled water in washed curd.
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2014, 05:51:19 AM »
  Susan, honestly, the spread sheets can be confusing to me, being shade blind, the colors can make it more so, and I am not that familiar with X-Cel.  I guess I'm just old school----the old for sure :) 
  I've tried your recipes because your finished product looks good and when you say it tastes just like Jarlsberg---I believe you----if I can achieve that level of success I will be thrilled-----bet you never thought you would be a rookie cheese maker and teacher to boot!!
Qdog