Author Topic: Online Course - How to Start an Artisan Cheese Business  (Read 301 times)

Offline SSM

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Online Course - How to Start an Artisan Cheese Business
« on: March 04, 2016, 08:41:27 AM »
Hi,

Just wanted to announce that I launched an online course this week called How to Start a Rewarding Artisan Cheese Business. You can see the details here if you're interested:  http://startacheesebusiness.com/join-us/

This isn't a course about how to make cheese per se, but rather on how to start and run an artisan cheese business, in case any of you are interested in that.


 

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Online Course - How to Start an Artisan Cheese Business
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2016, 05:23:52 PM »
You really should post more and become part of the Cheese Forum community before making the big sales pitch.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline Kern

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Re: Online Course - How to Start an Artisan Cheese Business
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2016, 05:46:40 PM »
You really should post more and become part of the Cheese Forum community before making the big sales pitch.


I agree.  I took a look at Tim's website to see what was in the course.  I think that the most challenging task in commercial cheesemaking is getting the governmental approvals to do so.  The course outline glosses over this in my opinion by stating that since each state is different there is not much point in getting into it - but here's an overview anyway.  While this may be true Tim could easily outline what he went through in Georgia with the caveat that "things may be different for your situation".

The problem with commercial artisan cheese making is that there is no cheap way to do it and comply with the regulations, which in most states provide little relief for the small cheesemaker.  See, for example, this.