Author Topic: Introduction  (Read 1375 times)

Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2013, 11:06:38 AM »
Your cheeses look great!!  Welcome to the forum!!


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Offline CheeWilly

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2013, 03:00:12 PM »
Hans,
You received a cheese from me (my first cheese award).   I give it to you because Holland is such a cool place in my mind and the Melktap is something I have never heard of until now.  You will love this friendly place, welcome.
The clever cat eats cheese and breathes down rat holes with baited breath.  W.C. Fields

Offline Hansadutta

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2013, 04:26:28 AM »
Herman,

I did some googling a few weeks ago and I ordered 2 pinotin and 2 cabertin plants from vitisvino.nl. I read 1 negative story about rondo so I decided to buy something else. I don't have room for 4 plants but that is a problem for the (near) future.

Jim,

Unfortunately I don't have access to a lot of fruits. Only elderberries and blackberries. If I want to make cherry wine it would cost me a fortune. Perhaps I can try to make wine with cherry jam.
I have tried plums and it was a nice wine but this was a rose.

Thanks a lot Al and Cheewilly. I enjoy the stories on the forum a lot. I had no idea it would be so exciting to watch a cheese ripe.  :)

Offline Tiarella

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2013, 07:14:33 AM »
Quote
At the moment I am experimenting with dried elderberries but I am afraid it is not the same.

Hans,  when I read this it made me remember when I was 19 and living in a house with 4 college students.  The bath tub faucet started dripping and I came back home to find that they had called a plumber to fix it on a Sunday!!  The most expensive time to hire an expensive person and it wasn't an emergency.  I told them to call and cancel and then went to the cellar to turn off the water to that part of the house so I could take the faucet apart to replace the washer at the tub.  While in the cellar tracing where the pipes were running I found a mysterious hidden room.  I only found it because pipes disappeared into it and I knew I was still under the house.  I found the hidden door and went in to find a hidden store of homemade wine made when alcohol was prohibited in the US.  I found elderberry wine from 1921, Dandelion wine, apple wine, etc.  The Elderberry wine was SO smooth. This was in 1979 so it was 58 years old!!  Some of the wine tasted more like turpentine but we drank it anyway.  Hey, I was young!   ;D

And I did fix the leak by walking to the hardware store and spending 5 pennies on the rubber washer and walking back to replace it.  We had something to celebrate that with thanks for finding the wine cellar!   ;D

Offline Hansadutta

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2013, 12:13:48 PM »
Ha ha. This is an amazing story. It has everything: poverty, decay, panicking idiots, heroisme, hope, justice, a hidden treasure, suspense, alcoholisme, a happy ending!

I can imagine that this must have been a fantastic wine.
Hans


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Offline Tiarella

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2013, 09:42:38 AM »
Ha ha. This is an amazing story. It has everything: poverty, decay, panicking idiots, heroisme, hope, justice, a hidden treasure, suspense, alcoholisme, a happy ending!

I can imagine that this must have been a fantastic wine.
Hans

Well, no alcoholism.  My housemates were young and earnest college students all excited about alternative lifestyles, healthy food, peace, etc which for me was just how I was raised.  They were clueless about running a house but luckily I knew to clean the rain gutters, fix things, etc.  It was an okay time but I moved after a year.

The wine WAS quite nice!!   ;D

it is nice to have you on the forum, Hans!  your humor is appreciated!!!!!  Fits right in!
« Last Edit: April 26, 2013, 04:51:26 AM by Tiarella »

Offline shotski

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2013, 05:07:17 PM »
Welcome Hansadutta it looks like you have a great start and will fit in well here. I have been making wine for many years and my favorite after 25 years is blueberry wine. I am not sure that they are available there in Holland but I use frozen wild berries that I purchase from a bakery wholesale supply distributor.  I still make lots of grape wines but really like the Blueberry wine. If you need a recipe let me know.

John

Offline Hansadutta

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #22 on: April 26, 2013, 03:19:09 AM »
Hi Shotski,

Blueberries are really expensive here. Ingredients for wine making are not available in my area. I make white wines from juices I buy in the supermarket and sometimes from fresh apples. To my surprise I find it pretty easy to make nice wines from the supermarket juices.
Red wines (My favourite according to Murphy's Law) are a different story. Elderberries and blackberries are there but I can never get enough of them. This year I made 70 litres which is drinkable in 2 years.
I tried to make some of the wine kits but so far the results are very disappointing. I am experimenting using a different yeast, adding dried elderberries and some more wood or tannine, sometimes a vanille stick and this usually makes them more interesting but I am not where I want to be. Yet.