Author Topic: Patience - the missing element  (Read 438 times)

Offline MrsKK

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Patience - the missing element
« on: April 19, 2013, 04:27:18 PM »
When I was new to making cheese, I rarely allowed my cheese to get any older than three months old.  It was exciting to taste test what I had made...but I know that I never tasted the full possibilities in the product, either.

Anyway, this week I opened two cheeses that have been aging for quite some time.  The first was a year-old cheddar, my first that I had made in over two years.  It was quite moldy and even very colorful once the mold was scrubbed off.



Once cut into, it has an almost marbled appearance. 

The texture is slightly crunchy, it is dry-ish, but not enough that it falls apart.  Very, very tasty.

The other cheese is a Raw Milk Tomme that is 17 months old.  Creamy texture, very sharp flavor.  Very very good.  Sorry, no pics on that one!

So, my conclusion is that, once I am geared up for making cheese again, I need to alternate a long-aging cheese with one that is meant to be eaten at a younger age.  That way, maybe I can get past the urge to eat them all before their time.


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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Patience - the missing element
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2013, 06:52:35 PM »
Words of wisdom, indeed! 

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Patience - the missing element
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2013, 11:48:03 PM »
That looks like a fantastic cheddar.  A cheese to you.  And yes, I highly recommend making some quick ones while aging out a bunch of others.  Aged gouda is great too!  :)

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline jwalker

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Re: Patience - the missing element
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2013, 08:24:36 AM »
I'm taking the same approach , I jumped right in and made too many cheeses , hopefully by the time I have tried half of them , the other half are very old , with others still aging at different levels.

Cheddar looks good.

Cheers , Jim.
No..........I'm not a professional CheeseMaker , but I play one on TV.

Offline sdbennett

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Re: Patience - the missing element
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2013, 09:28:34 AM »
I'm taking the same approach , I jumped right in and made too many cheeses , hopefully by the time I have tried half of them , the other half are very old , with others still aging at different levels.

Cheddar looks good.

Cheers , Jim.

Made too many cheeses?  Never heard of such a thing! :o


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Offline MrsKK

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Re: Patience - the missing element
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2013, 09:41:41 AM »
I go in phases of making a lot of cheese, then not making any at all for months on end.  Usually make a lot when my cow is first fresh, then once the calf/calves are taking most of the milk, I rarely have enough for cheesemaking, so I go through a dry period.  About a month or two before I dry her off, I wean any calf she may still have on her, then I'm milking and making cheeses again.  The Tomme and cheddar are the only cheeses I have right now.  Sad...

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Patience - the missing element
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2013, 03:29:33 PM »
Your lancashire is a good quick make, and butterkase is another that is nice quickly.  Caerphilly is quick and one of my favorites, and of course cams are ready in about a month or so.  Those give a good range of quick cheeses, with time to make longer aging ones in between (cheddars, aged goudas, parms, etc). 

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.