Author Topic: Jarlsberg  (Read 1499 times)

Offline KTownCheese

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  • Posts: 97
  • Cheeses: 2
  • Default personal text
Jarlsberg
« on: April 24, 2013, 06:53:11 AM »
After playing around with blues and washed rind ripened cheese using BL I decided it was time to try some for some "eyes".
I bought a new stockpot (15L), sourced out some propionic and some thermo C and got cracking.  I started with the recipe fro artisanal cheese making at home and made a 2 gallon cheese using 2% milk.  As I said, I used thermo C and Propionic from glengarry cheese making supplies (Alexandria, Ontario).  Things seemed to work out pretty good as the curds gave a really nice clean break and they went into the homemade 8" tome pretty easily.  Pressed with 10lbs for 30 mins and with 15 for 12 hours afterwards.  The pic below shows the cheese nearing the end of is drying phase.  It has another 12 hours and then into the wax it will go!
Heres hoping I will have 2lb of delicious Jarls in a few months.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Schnecken Slayer

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Newcastle, Australia
  • Posts: 428
  • Cheeses: 14
  • Making cheese since October 2012
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2013, 02:38:05 PM »
You didn't mention it so I am wondering if you brined this one?
My first Jarlsberg was too wet when I waxed it and ended up splitting.

Hopefully you will get some nice swelling.  ;)
-Bill
One day I will add something here...

Offline KTownCheese

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  • Posts: 97
  • Cheeses: 2
  • Default personal text
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2013, 09:14:28 PM »
This Jarl was brined.  I used a near saturated brine (20 oz of salt per gallon) for 12 hours.  When I shaved off the corners prior to drying the taste was pretty good so I think ive found the perfect salt level.

My recipe calls for two days of drying to be sure its ready to wax.  Hopefully it turns out. 

Stay tuned and I'll post pics as it progresses.

Cheers
Al

Offline KTownCheese

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  • Posts: 97
  • Cheeses: 2
  • Default personal text
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2013, 04:29:28 PM »
Just an update, I waxed the Jarl this afternoon.  Now into 50 degree storage for a couple weeks!

Offline Schnecken Slayer

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Newcastle, Australia
  • Posts: 428
  • Cheeses: 14
  • Making cheese since October 2012
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2013, 05:09:08 PM »
You did a nice job on the waxing. With the swelling my wax was ready to burst.
-Bill
One day I will add something here...


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline shotski

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Hamilton, On Canada
  • Posts: 313
  • Cheeses: 6
  • Default personal text
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2013, 06:35:48 PM »
looks nice KTownCheese, keep us posted as to how it turns our.

Offline High Altitude

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Colorado
  • Posts: 234
  • Cheeses: 18
  • Cheesemaking & Winemaking
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2013, 02:20:36 PM »
Let us know how it is when it's been out for a day or so at the warm phase.  I made the same recipe (but with 7 qts whole and 1 qt 1.5% milk), and the wax split on day 1 of the warm phase.  It swelled some during the first two weeks following and then aged nicely until the 6 week point when I opened it.

Just made another one (since I was so happy with the results of the first) and will skip the waxing this time.
Have some (homemade) wine with that cheese!

Offline KTownCheese

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  • Posts: 97
  • Cheeses: 2
  • Default personal text
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2013, 05:09:56 PM »
Looks like my Jarl is buldging after only two days in the warm phase.

Offline KTownCheese

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  • Posts: 97
  • Cheeses: 2
  • Default personal text
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2013, 06:13:34 AM »
Also, there appears to be pin holes around the edges and they are leaking with liquid.  Should I peel off the wax and re-seal?

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,108
  • Cheeses: 186
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2013, 07:54:42 AM »
Why is it even sealed at this point? I don't understand the logic behind hard-coating a cheese that is expected to swell.  ???

Why don't you remove the wax and maintain the rind until post-swelling, at which time you can coat to your heart's content.  :)

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline KTownCheese

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  • Posts: 97
  • Cheeses: 2
  • Default personal text
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2013, 08:11:07 AM »
I was just following a recipe.  Im not as skilled at making cheese as some of the people on this forum or confident enough to alter a recipe right off the hop.
However I will take this advice to heart for my next Jarl.

Offline Schnecken Slayer

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Newcastle, Australia
  • Posts: 428
  • Cheeses: 14
  • Making cheese since October 2012
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2013, 12:23:33 PM »
If it is sweating then I would do as Boofer suggests and remove the wax. You don't want the cheese sitting in a puddle.
-Bill
One day I will add something here...

Offline Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,108
  • Cheeses: 186
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2013, 03:18:28 PM »
I was just following a recipe.  I'm not as skilled at making cheese as some of the people on this forum or confident enough to alter a recipe right off the top.
However I will take this advice to heart for my next Jarl.
That's one of the tough things I have found in this cheese adventure...chasing down reliable recipes. A lot of the recipes from Ricki Carroll's book and a few from 200 Easy Cheeses lead you down the wrong path. Some folks here have been hammering away at a particular cheese style and have fine-tuned their recipe so that it's almost foolproof. Right, Jeff? ;)

Looks like your recipe might require an edit.  :)

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline JeffHamm

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
  • Posts: 2,585
  • Cheeses: 155
  • As goes the cheesemaker, so goes the cheese
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2013, 03:24:12 PM »
Take very careful notes while making each cheese.  Read this board a lot, and compare what people do with the outcome.  Threads that fail to show the final cheese are often hard to interpret, because you don't know if it worked!  After making a few cheeses, you'll get an idea (i.e. I think my curds are retaining too much moisture when they go into the mould), then you can read what people do to remove moisture and try something.  Keep tweaking your last make until you get something that works (I copy my previous make notes, remove the details, and decide what bits I'm going to adjust, unless I'm trying to replicate of course).

It's all about guided trial and error, really.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline KTownCheese

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  • Posts: 97
  • Cheeses: 2
  • Default personal text
Re: Jarlsberg
« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2013, 07:56:55 PM »
Thanks guys!  I started making a chees journal way back and it is super helpful.  but by far this forum has been the biggest help of all.
I peeled off the wax and the cheese is drying so hopefully things go well.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2013, 08:04:11 PM by KTownCheese »