Author Topic: First Farhouse cheddar  (Read 1352 times)

Offline KTownCheese

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First Farhouse cheddar
« on: May 05, 2013, 06:51:09 AM »
I decided to take a break from blues and washed rinds so I bought a couple gallons of milk and started in on a Farmhouse Chear with Chives.
I used the recipe from Artisan cheesemaking at home and things seem to be working out quite nicely.  Heres hoping this little beauty develops into a tasty cheese.

Offline bbracken677

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2013, 08:13:05 AM »
It looks like you have some herbs or something in there... Or is it jalapeno?

Offline KTownCheese

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2013, 08:25:04 AM »
I put chives in there

Offline Tiarella

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2013, 09:13:05 AM »
I put chives in there

gee, is that why you called it a Farmhouse Cheddar With Chives?  or was that just a coincidence?   >:D

Sorry, couldn't resist!   ;D

Serious question now: Did you use dried chives or fresh?  or rather, since it's a bit early for chives to be growing outside at least, does the recipe mention that you have to use one and not the other?
« Last Edit: June 19, 2013, 07:49:44 PM by Tiarella »

Offline bbracken677

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2013, 11:37:05 AM »
I put chives in there

gee, is that why you called it a Farmhouse Heddar With Chives?  or was that just a coincidence?   >:D

Sorry, couldn't resist!   ;D



Doh! I totally missed that...... 

Offline KTownCheese

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2013, 07:57:01 PM »
I used dried. I think the key is not using anything too moist. I tried an American brick with fresh and it went sour on me from too much moisture.  if you do use dried, be sure to sterilize your herbs first!

Offline Tiarella

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2013, 08:12:23 PM »
I used dried. I think the key is not using anything too moist. I tried an American brick with fresh and it went sour on me from too much moisture.  if you do use dried, be sure to sterilize your herbs first!

I've wondered about sterilizing herbs or the shitake mushrooms I use but haven't yet.  I also use star anise in my foggy style cheeses and so far it's fine.  I've been wondering about a cheese with cardomum (why can't I spell that tonight???) but was wondering whether it, and other herbs would inhibit the cultures.  Any experience or ideas about that?

How do you sterilize the herbs without destroying the flavors?
 :)   Kathrin

Offline KTownCheese

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2013, 08:39:17 PM »
with chives a simple water bath would work.  Id also consider baking the spices as well all though im no expert at this.

Offline Tiarella

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2013, 09:29:58 PM »
with chives a simple water bath would work.  Id also consider baking the spices as well all though im no expert at this.

How does a water bath wash fungal and yeast hitchhikers?  I'd think heat would be necessary?

Offline KTownCheese

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2013, 09:42:32 PM »
sorry by water bath I meant a bath in boiling water. 

Offline orion113

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2013, 03:24:14 PM »
I too made this same cheese, used dried chives also but did not re-hydrate or anything.  I used the mold suggested in the book, a 7 inch one, and it was way too big for this cheese.   In hindsight I would have used my 2 pound (4.5 inch) one.  It is pretty thin but I am going to age it for a bit anyway.  I just vac sealed it in my Foodsaver instead of waxing.  Actually right after the dry out after brining I tried a little bit of it and it was pretty darn good!  Hopefully in a few weeks it will improve and not be a disaster.

Offline tnbquilt

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2013, 11:08:01 PM »
A comment about the book, have you ever gone to the website and printed off the pdf file for revisions to the book?  I checked mine for this cheese and the mold size was not changed, but in some of the recipes the revisions had the mold size changed. I think this one should have been changed as well. An 8 inch mold for a 2 gallon milk is really odd.
Tammy

Offline shotski

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2013, 05:14:11 AM »
I used dried. I think the key is not using anything too moist. I tried an American brick with fresh and it went sour on me from too much moisture.  if you do use dried, be sure to sterilize your herbs first!

I've wondered about sterilizing herbs or the shitake mushrooms I use but haven't yet.  I also use star anise in my foggy style cheeses and so far it's fine.  I've been wondering about a cheese with cardomum (why can't I spell that tonight???) but was wondering whether it, and other herbs would inhibit the cultures.  Any experience or ideas about that?

How do you sterilize the herbs without destroying the flavors?
 :)   Kathrin

I have also read you can sterilize herb seeds or any other ingredients for that
 matter in the microwave. If you want to keep them dry just put the herbs on a plate  but make sure you put a cup of water in the microwave as well. and cook for a couple of minutes


Offline orion113

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2013, 08:03:04 AM »
I am relieved that I was not missing something with this recipe.  I even ordered and waited for the larger mold for the first make of this, thinking the directions must be correct.  The pressing times for at least this one were very low too, mine is really not knitted well at all.  One the second make I used pressing weights from an earlier Colby I made and the knit was very good.  The second time I also used a 2 gallon mold and am pleased with the look of it anyway.  Have to wait a few more weeks to try it.

Offline tnbquilt

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Re: First Farhouse cheddar
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2013, 08:50:11 AM »
I have made the Just Jack and the Ale Soaked Trappist cheese, and both of those are pressed way too light, they didn't knit either. If I use one of her recipes, I compare pressing instructions from my other 4 books and I stick to 2 gallons of milk goes in the 4-1/2" mold, 4 gallons of milk goes in the 6" mold, and that's as far as I go. I do have a 1lb mold, it's a little bitty thing that I never use.
Tammy