Author Topic: My First Farmhouse Cheddar  (Read 1236 times)

Offline Brian

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My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« on: February 23, 2009, 06:28:14 PM »
I made this using store bought milk on January 4th of this year.  I couldn't wait any longer to try it.
Boy is it going to be good in another month or so.
You can see in the photo that it is kind of creamy and left remnants on the wax and on the knife I used.  Tastes real good and cheddary, but it has a slight, and I mean slight acidic aftertaste which I figure is from being young. It doesn't last long and you forget about it quickly.
But the cheddar is definitely there.

Looks like I could of used more weight too.




Brian





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Offline Cartierusm

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2009, 07:34:57 PM »
I don't know it looks pretty good.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline Brian

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2009, 07:43:51 PM »
After eating the entire wedge, ah hum............. I'm guessing it doesn't need more weight.  Farmhouse is supposed to be crumbly and it is that if you try to cut a "slice" off of it.
I re-waxed and it's back in the shed.  Looking forward to the traditional Cheddar and Gouda I made back in November.  But I got that itch to sample....................

Brian


Offline Likesspace

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2009, 09:45:07 PM »
Brian...
First of all, this cheese looks really good to me. Farmhouse Cheddare doesnt' seem to have as much of a "closed" texture as say a Stirred Curd variety.
I would be interested in knowing the diameter of your wheel as well as the pressing weights you used.
I now religiously follow the mantra of higher pressing weights for larger wheels.
Depending upon your answer I will turn the floor over to Carter since he is our press weight expert.

Dave

Offline chilipepper

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2009, 09:50:38 PM »
Brian, that looks very nice! Very similar to My first one I sampled over here.

It is amazing how good they do taste when you can finally sample the fruits of your labor. 

As for the weight, as Dave, said it will depend on the diameter of your mold.  I wouldn't be too concerned as this looks to be pretty close to the style here.

Congrats!

Ryan


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Offline Cartierusm

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2009, 03:21:26 AM »
Press weight expert, well my bathroom scale would agree.

How much weight are you using to press? All pressures, basically tell us your regiment.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline Brian

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2009, 09:21:10 AM »
OK

It's that spa skimmer basket mold and it's.......................hold on I have a cheese pressing and can't measure it, but I measured an air drying wheel and it's 6.5 inches. 
2 Gallons of store bought whole milk.

Pressing went this way.

Pressed at 20 lbs for 10 minutes
Added weight to 30 lbs and pressed at 20 lbs for 10 minutes
Flipped and pressed at 40 lbs for 2 hours
""                             50 lbs for 24 hours


Air dried before waxing.

Brian

EDIT NOTE:  I had put pressing schedule for a Stircurred I had made, not the Farmhouse
« Last Edit: February 25, 2009, 07:29:01 PM by Brian »

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2009, 01:51:27 PM »
Are those actual pounds? Because for larger wheels you have to use more weight. What are the pounds the recipe calls for?
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline Brian

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2009, 02:14:34 PM »
Yes actual pounds and that's what the recipe calls for.  Although the recipe is for 2 gallons.  So that means I'm going to need more weight I figure.
What would you suggest?

Brian

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2009, 06:23:11 PM »
If you do a search for pressure I posted a chart that breaks down how to calculate it for different molds. If not let me know and I'll see what I can dig up, but there are quite a few posts out there that discuss in detail.
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Offline Likesspace

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2009, 07:23:09 PM »
Brian, I will add this.
Either find Carter's pressing weight table or make sure you ask for his advice.
Since I've been using his weights, I'm finally getting the texture in my cheese that I've always wanted.
By looking at the outside of one of my (earlier) 6" wheels, the cheese looked really good. It was only when cutting into one that the curd was open and not nearly as tight as it's commercial counterpart.
Once I moved to an 8" wheel the problems was even more pronounced. Not only was the interior of the cheese open, I could not even get a good knit on the surface.
Now I'm turning out wheels that are true to the commercial varieties (texture wise) and it's all due to the information that Carter and Wayne worked out.
You'll be happy you gave the higher pressures a try.

Dave

Offline Brian

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2009, 07:54:50 PM »
I've looked at the chart and don't get it.

The mold I'm using is 6.75 inches in diameter.  According to the recipe I was using, how much more weight should I add per step?

Thanks

Brian

Offline Likesspace

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2009, 08:22:16 PM »
Brian,
First of all, the following numbers will not be exact. My mind is pretty much mush right now and I'm not sure I could work out the math correctly for your 6.75" mold (even though it's a fairly easy process).
Just to give you an idea of what the increased pressing weights should be (this is from a chart that I have):

6" mold:
15 lbs. = 40.5 lbs.
30 lbs. = 67.5 lbs.
50 lbs. = 112.5 lbs.

7.5" mold:
15 lbs. = 49.5 lbs.
30 lbs. = 105.5 lbs.
50 lbs. = 176 lbs.

8" mold:
15 lbs. = 56.5 lbs.
30 lbs. = 120 lbs.
50 lbs. = 202 lbs.

As you can see, as the wheel size goes up, so does the pressing weight.
I know this sounds like a lot but the higher weights are fairly easy to accomplish, considering the type of press that you have.
If using the "four post, dowel/board" type of press you can buy concrete paving blocks that are approx. 14" square x 2" thick, which weight about 22 lbs. each. Since these are large, flat and square they are fairly stable.
This method does work okay, but the stacking and unstacking is a major pain and (at least on my old press) I was constantly having to make minute adjustments to the blocks to keep from ending up with a lopsided cheese.
The easiest and most efficient way (plug ahead) is to check into one of Carter's pneumatic presses which makes the process as painless as possible and completely carefree.
Now I simply set my air pressure...flip a switch and walk away. It really is that easy and you always know exactly what pressure is being applied.
I know I write a lot about this press design but it really does deserve the high marks I've given it. It's not like I'm working on a commission program. I just believe in this design and each time I use it I am more convinced.
As I said, the numbers are not exact for your size of mold but at least they will give you an idea of what we have been talking about.
Hopefully Carter or Wayne will chime in soon with the exact numbers.
Hope this helps....

Dave

Offline Brian

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Re: My First Farmhouse Cheddar
« Reply #13 on: February 24, 2009, 09:53:56 PM »
That works.
Thanks!

I was going to make cheese tomorrow but.....................the washer blew out and i have to go get the other one out of storage.

I'm starting the new pressing amounts on the next one.
I'm going to figure that 20 lbs = 45, 30 lbs =67, 40 lbs = 100, and 50 lbs = 130
I'm just ballparking.
Oh, and I use old barbell weights.  Stack em up right on the follower.

Thanks again!

Brian

EDIT:  OK, too much rain to go to the storage for the washer.  I'm making cheese today with SB milk and will use the new press schedule.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2009, 12:26:50 PM by Brian »